Archinect - News 2015-11-28T17:03:26-05:00 A wrap-up of Vancouver's "City Fabric" Julia Ingalls 2015-10-01T19:00:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T01:25:11-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Construction safety netting may not sound like the stuff which picturesque <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">cityscapes</a> are made of, and yet: <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Vancouver, B.C</a>. was host to an art installation known as "City Fabric" this past August and September which produced more gorgeous visuals (and sly references to real estate speculation) than your typical netting.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Designed by artist Rebecca Bayer and architect Matthew Soules, the installation hung beneath the south side of Burrard Street Bridge between concrete piers as a kind of celebration of the ephemeral, specifically "the temporary permanence of construction debris netting; beautiful, impoverished for its utilitarian use, yet profoundly normal."&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The installation, which was sponsored by 221A and The Burred Arts Foundation, officially closed on September 30th and consisted of 800 lineal feet of the netting.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Pop Rocks: Soft Urban Boulder Field Alexander Walter 2012-10-04T14:22:00-04:00 >2012-10-08T18:35:14-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="347" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Vancouver hosted a fascinating hybrid of public spatial art and waste material upcycling in its downtown area this summer: Pop Rocks, a temporary installation that covered a full city block. The project is fabricated entirely from post-consumer and post-industrial waste from the metropolitan Vancouver region.</p></em><br /><br /><p> <em>The installation, an equal collaboration between <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Matthew Soules Architecture</a> and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">AFJD Studio</a> (Amber Frid-Jimenez &amp; Joe Dahmen), engages tactically with these materials to produce soft forms that extend the typical range of active and passive social activities, fostering unexpected social encounters and new perspectives on the city.</em></p>