Archinect - News 2014-07-28T22:56:26-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/103863117/a-look-at-the-results-of-the-canactions-2014-user-generated-kyiv-competition A look at the results of the CANactions 2014 “User-generated Kyiv” competition Justine Testado 2014-07-10T14:27:00-04:00 >2014-07-10T14:41:42-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/2g/2gblm64pweru23w6.jpg" width="514" height="677" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Ukraine's largest architectural event CANactions held its 2014 ideas competition, whose theme was "User-generated Kyiv". Based on reinforcing the valuable idea that a city is shaped by its citizens, the competition sought architectural ideas to help Kiev further develop towards the ideals of creativity, peace, justice, and of course, happiness.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Here's a look at the three top-prize winning entries:</p><p>Pictured above: <strong>1st prize:</strong> connecTABLE by Anna Dobrova, Dima Isaiev, Dasha Zaichenko,Daryna Bagachuk, Anna Kamushan (Vienna, Austria).</p><p><strong>2nd prize:</strong> POP-UP KIEV by Polina Timofeeva, Galyna Tolkachova, Pavel Bartov (Perm, Russia).</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/9x/9x32bt8ebr7866xh.jpg"></p><p><strong>3rd prize: </strong>Reload the symbols by Kateryna Bokatova and Frederic Vincent (Bordeaux, France).</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/hd/hdelp6wqsulv2b8e.jpg"></p><p>Head over to <a href="http://www.bustler.net/index.php/article/results_of_canactions_user-generated_kyiv_competition/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a> for more details.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/95874935/a-peek-inside-yanukovych-s-luxury-villa A Peek Inside Yanukovych's Luxury Villa Alexander Walter 2014-03-17T15:56:00-04:00 >2014-03-25T20:47:10-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/ay/aynai8iszm859l5g.jpg" width="514" height="334" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>After Viktor Yanukovych fled, many Ukrainians were astounded by their former leader's opulent residence. So far images have only been shown of a few rooms. A SPIEGEL ONLINE special with 360-degree panorama photos now offers a walkthrough of the spectacular villa.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/85676869/this-is-a-polish-city This is a Polish city Nam Henderson 2013-11-03T12:43:00-05:00 >2013-11-03T12:43:41-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/a2/a22cwp4mnn3jt11q.jpg" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>"I saw churches from the many different denominations that shaped this city&rsquo;s skyline: a squat Armenian cathedral from the 14th century with a jumble of intersecting roofs; a huge 17th-century Baroque church built by the Jesuits and modeled on the Church of the Ges&ugrave; in Rome; Ukrainian Orthodox three-dome churches"</p></em><br /><br /><p> Alex Ulam recently traveled to&nbsp;Lviv, Ukraine to reconnect with a family history whose ties were cut in the late 1930's, following the Nazi invasion of Poland. There he discovers a rich and polyglot architectural history, ranging from neo-Renaissance buildings, to Art Nouveau,&nbsp;Renaissance and Baroque-era palaces, Soviet style towers and even&nbsp;Ukrainian Secessionist architecture.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/13731551/ukraine-s-wooden-churches-and-folk-architecture-s Ukraine’s Wooden Churches and Folk architecture(s) Nam Henderson 2011-07-17T21:12:41-04:00 >2011-11-24T09:05:52-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/2s/2sw6zlzvj3ce79m5.jpg" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The language was impossible to understand, but the building itself communicated in a clear vernacular: thick columns, coarsely hewn and partly painted white, were topped with gold-haloed icons and lovely scarves that must have been embroidered by hand. The ceiling in the back was only an arm&rsquo;s breadth above my head...</p></em><br /><br /><p> <img alt="" src="http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/misc/pixel.gif">Evan Rail travels to the&nbsp;Carpathian foothills near&nbsp;Zakarpattia, the western region of Ukraine. The vernacular folk architecture includes a number of unusual wooden churches dating from the 15th to 18th centuries. After years of neglect, the buildings are in danger of disappearing and being forgotten.</p>