Archinect - News 2014-04-20T17:07:14-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/85775750/fabric-s-zoetrope-inspired-trylletromler-pavilion-in-king-s-garden-copenhagen FABRIC's zoetrope-inspired "Trylletromler" pavilion in King's Garden, Copenhagen Justine Testado 2013-11-04T19:27:00-05:00 >2013-11-11T21:20:22-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/kr/krvn82d47htrxm26.jpg" width="514" height="374" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> The "Trylletromler" pavilion by Dutch firm <a href="http://www.fabrications.nl/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">FABRIC</a> has attracted plenty of public attention in King's Garden, Copenhagen since its public opening this past September. The installation was built after FABRIC won a temporary-pavilion design competition earlier this year. (Check out our previous coverage <a href="http://www.bustler.net/index.php/article/fabric_wins_competition_for_a_temporary_pavilion_in_the_kings_garden_in_cop/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a> on our sister site Bustler)</p> <p> The concept of Trylletromler comes from the Danish word for the 19th-century zoetrope device, which gives the illusion of movement in a still image. Based on this idea, the pavilion's fence is built as a paradoxically transparent maze that creates the illusion of motion as one walks through it.</p> <p> <img alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/li/lidjneqvkzt555fo.jpg" title=""></p> <p> <strong>Here's a more detailed project description and some recent photos we received from FABRIC:</strong></p> <p> "...The Renaissance garden design of Rosenborg Castle is the oldest known example of garden design in Denmark. The design draws heavily on principles of Euclidean geometry. This language of absolute space was long regarded as the construction principle of the worl...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/75999072/dalston-house Dalston House Andrew Davis 2013-06-28T11:53:00-04:00 >2013-07-01T18:54:07-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/wx/wxmtmybqy8ktwvkj.jpg" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Wainwright - "So Leandro we are sitting on a window ledge in Dalston. Can you tell us why we're here? Erlich - "The idea is to create a facade that will resemble the architecture of the . . . neighborhood and um - that has always been part of my interest to bring the ordinary architecture as a stage for the public to participate in a kind of fiction that would be built through the experience."</p></em><br /><br /><p> Though edging on the sphere of art, Erlich's <em>Dalston House</em> provides a publicly accessible perversion of what would otherwise be banal architecture. This project uses that unexpected architectural content to foster rich narratives both as unique experiences and serendipitous performances. As Erlich says "Reality is what we build; it is not something given."</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/12532988/how-a-parisian-artist-created-this-stunning-optical-illusion How A Parisian Artist Created This Stunning Optical Illusion Archinect 2011-07-07T11:45:10-04:00 >2011-07-07T18:13:54-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/6e/6e0a8e8fa7634f232e5cd629caac092a.jpg" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>This work of art looks like a giant grass sphere, but it's actually flat. This land art is an anamorphosis which is a distorted projection that comes to life when viewed at the proper angle. Stand to the side and you will see angular grass and dirt. Stand at the correct angle and the 3D image jumps out at you.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html>