Archinect - News 2017-07-23T16:52:18-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/150010211/archinect-lax-det-mini-sessions-a-conversation-with-architect-academic-andrew-zago Archinect LAX >< DET Mini Sessions; A Conversation with Architect/Academic Andrew Zago Paul Petrunia 2017-05-31T16:03:00-04:00 >2017-06-01T13:42:05-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/uploads/ad/adr9jo625aofzf42.gif" width="2000" height="2000" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>This week we are releasing a series of conversations, or "<a href="http://archinect.com/news/tag/666774/mini-sessions" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mini-Sessions</a>", with architects and designers in&nbsp;<a href="http://archinect.com/news/tag/1322/los-angeles" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LA</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://archinect.com/news/tag/12263/detroit" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Detroit</a>, in partnership with the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ladesignfestival.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Los Angeles Design Festival</a>. The festival will be taking place in Downtown LA from June 8 to 11th. Today we're sharing my conversation with&nbsp;<a href="http://archinect.com/firms/cover/4055/zago-architecture" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Andrew Zago</a>, LA-based architect and educator. We talk about growing up in Detroit, early inspirations, working on <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/150006893/want-to-live-in-thom-mayne-s-iconic-sixth-street-house" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Thom Mayne&rsquo;s iconic Sixth Street House</a>, his so-called unusual early work in <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/111277679/vertical-studio-at-sci-arc-proposes-a-hybrid-brothel-child-care-center" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Jeff Kipnis</a>, and his approach and thoughts on the current state of <a href="http://archinect.com/news/category/89/academia" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">architectural education</a>.&nbsp;</p><p></p><p>If you&rsquo;re able to attend the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ladesignfestival.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LA Design Festival</a>, make sure to check out the&nbsp;live panel, titled&nbsp;<a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/lax-det-tickets-33874062232" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LAX &gt;&lt; DET</a>, discussing the connection between LA and Detroit, a collaboration with the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.detroitdesignfestival.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Detroit Design Festival</a>&nbsp;and the <a href="http://laforum.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">L.A. Forum for Architecture and Design</a>. The event will be taking place on June 10th, from 2-4pm at&nbsp;<a href="http://rowdtla.com/offices/777-s-alameda-st/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">ROW DTLA</a>&nbsp;777 Alameda Street, and will include Edwin Chan, Chris Denson,&nbsp;Lorcan O&rsquo;Herlihy, and Eileen Lee.</p>... http://archinect.com/news/article/52425032/the-housing-question The Housing Question Places Journal 2012-06-25T13:48:00-04:00 >2012-07-09T16:40:47-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/gu/gu3tyj2qjm9ugrp0.jpg" width="650" height="439" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Foreclosed is controversial because it suggests that the state, or the public sector &mdash; conceived along with civil society in terms of multiple, overlapping, virtual and actual publics &mdash; might play a more active, direct and enlightened role in the provision of housing and, by extension, of education, health care and other infrastructures of daily life in the United States.... Simply put, can we no longer imagine architecture without developers?</p></em><br /><br /><p> Earlier this year <em>Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream</em> opened at MoMA in New York. The exhibition quickly became controversial, with some decrying it as elitist and paternalistic, others defending it as powerful and ambitious. On Places, Reinhold Martin, co-organizer of Foreclosed, and Raphael Sperry and Amit Price Patel, of Architects/Designers/Planners for Social Responsibility, continue the debate &mdash; in a virtual roundtable &mdash; along with IDEO.org fellow Liz Ogbu and urban planner Tom Angotti of Hunter College.</p>