Archinect - News 2014-12-21T19:01:39-05:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/52098583/some-thoughts-on-international-architectural-competitions-in-the-21st-century Some thoughts on international architectural competitions in the 21st century Nam Henderson 2012-06-20T19:22:00-04:00 >2012-06-21T14:20:09-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/ug/ug97tsr32ndi1tdh.jpg" width="514" height="293" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>There is, however, a problem: the good intentions McEwan's column irradiates with almost blinding intensity conceal a series of assumptions that struggle to stand up under closer scrutiny.</p></em><br /><br /><p> A few days ago in an essay published by&nbsp;<a href="http://www.klatmagazine.com/about" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">klat magazine</a> Mitch McEwen, reflecting on the <a href="http://www.moc.gov.bh/en/babcompetition/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bab al Bahrain Open Ideas Competition</a>, contended that <a href="http://www.klatmagazine.com/architecture/urban-design-serves-as-tool-of-repression-in-bahrain/6091" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Urban Design Serves as Tool of Repression in Bahrain</a>. Joseph Grima provided an immediate response via Twitter suggesting that Mitch's article was a "<a href="http://twitter.com/joseph_grima/status/213620158080630784" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Well-written, well-intentioned but simplistic and self-righteous critique of Bab El Bahrain competition</a>". Today Mr. Grima took the opportunity to publish a more in depth response in an op-ed for domus, in which he concluded "<em>There is value in this debate around the moral duties of the architectural profession in a globalised 21st century, so long as we recognise that the issue is a complex one: we won't find the answers in silver bullets or blacklists, but in dialogue and gradual reform</em>".</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/51869695/editor-s-picks-269 Editor's Picks #269 Nam Henderson 2012-06-18T19:54:00-04:00 >2012-06-19T23:59:06-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/73/738rkryxdtd020gq.jpg" width="454" height="599" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Andrew Ferren traveled to Turkey on an architectural pilgrimage, to learn more about the work of a 16th-century architect and engineer named Sinan. VanillaBrice commented "The Sokollu Pasha Mosque is an incredible study of fitting an impressive religious building in a neighborhood setting. The scale and way he controlled the sloping site display his mastery."</p></em><br /><br /><p> <strong>&nbsp;News</strong></p> <p> <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/50957424/sinan-the-world-s-first-starchitect" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Andrew Ferren traveled to Turkey on an architectural pilgrimage, to learn more about the work of a 16th-century architect and engineer named Sinan</a>. <strong>VanillaBrice</strong> commented "<em>The Sokollu Pasha Mosque is an incredible study of fitting an impressive religious building in a neighborhood setting. The scale and way he controlled the sloping site display his mastery. I heard that there are pieces of the Kaaba Stone set in some of the door lintels. Visiting this building should be on the "Istanbul To-Do List" of every designer.</em>"</p> <p> A piece by Sarah Good year for the Atlantic Cities network <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/51398282/debating-the-root-causes-of-zombie-infrastructure" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">questioned whether bringing the strip malls and other zombie infrastructure of the American landscape back to life really the best that we can imagine?&nbsp;</a><strong>HandsumCa$hMoneyYo</strong> began by agreeing "<em>Oh, that is a beautiful strip mall.&nbsp; I agree with the man, really, it's one of the best. If you really want to get to the root of zombie infrastructure then you need to start looking at zombie money and zombie b...</em></p>