Archinect - News 2014-09-17T09:43:40-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/106875970/brave-new-recycling-economy-movement-turns-trash-to-treasure Brave New Recycling Economy: Movement Turns Trash to Treasure Alexander Walter 2014-08-18T17:14:00-04:00 >2014-08-28T10:16:16-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/o2/o2hnqpg8a6j7nc0b.jpg" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Every piece of garbage can be turned into raw material that can be used in future products. With his influential Cradle to Cradle movement, Germany's Michael Braungart espouses a form of eco-hedonism that puts smart production before conservation.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Recently on Archinect: <a href="http://archinect.com/features/article/103711909/student-works-this-house-made-of-trash-teaches-a-lesson-in-green-housekeeping" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Student Works: This house made of trash teaches a lesson in green housekeeping</a></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/94341187/consider-the-dumpster Consider the dumpster... Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-02-25T13:38:00-05:00 >2014-03-03T21:08:57-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/fp/fpetglkkr3c4rnzs.jpg" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The long and varied history of waste and its removal in New York from the 18th century onwards is the subject of Elizabeth Royte&rsquo;s 2005 book Garbage Land and of the Urban Omnibus City of Systems video she narrates. In the video, Royte describes how her research into where exactly her trash was going after she threw it out has led her to become a more ecological citizen, with &ldquo;a systems view&rdquo; of our interconnected processes of manufacturing, transportation, disposal and re-use.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/76898650/turning-waste-into-building-blocks-of-the-future-city Turning waste into building blocks of the future city Archinect 2013-07-12T12:32:00-04:00 >2013-07-15T18:20:10-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/36/36059f19667a0e299db276b373bf23c1.jpg" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>What if the rubbish was refabricated to become real urban spaces or buildings? If it is plausible to adapt current machinery, how much material is available? At first sight, any sanitary landfill may be viewed as an ample supply of building materials. Heavy industrial technologies crush cars or to automatically sort out garbage are readily available. 3-D printing has exhausting capabilities if adjusted to larger scales.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/10047594/urban-mining-the-future Urban mining-the future Nam Henderson 2011-06-15T20:32:23-04:00 >2011-11-24T09:05:52-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/n1/n19yowil2h9jci7a.jpg" width="514" height="340" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> The demand for special metals used in the manufacture of electronics is booming, but a few countries control much of the world's supply. Germany is looking to reduce its reliance on imports by exploiting the metal that is thrown away in trash. Urban mining could become big business.&nbsp;</p>