Archinect - News 2014-10-02T00:39:28-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/106961208/editor-s-picks-381 Editor's Picks #381 Nam Henderson 2014-08-19T20:36:00-04:00 >2014-08-19T20:37:07-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/5l/5lff5ykdnxgxtpnj.jpg" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><a href="http://archinect.com/nicholaskorody" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Nicholas Korody</a>&nbsp;penned,&nbsp;<a href="http://archinect.com/features/article/106114990/shitting-architecture-the-dirty-practice-of-waste-removal" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Shitting Architecture: the dirty practice of waste removal</a>.&nbsp;Therein drawing lessons; from Slavoj Zizek on the toilet and <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timothy_Morton" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Timothy Morton</a> (of Object-Oriented Ontology [OOO]) on sustainability as the preservation of the status quo, he argues that "<em>Under the weight of the ecological crisis, the world has been flattened. There is no exit</em>".</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/d0/d0fcle6sz9qdc5cu.jpg"></p><p>&nbsp;In response, <a href="http://archinect.com/orhan" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Orhan Ayy&uuml;ce</a>&nbsp;offered up an image of the sublimely absurd, "<em>I am always baffled by big houses that are marketed with +5.5 bathrooms (very common in wealthy neighborhoods) and so on. And of course these host extremely hi end living styles. It is kind of funny to think all these people do all day is shit and shit and shit everywhere in the house</em>".</p><p><br>For the latest edition of <a href="http://archinect.com/features/tag/1149/working-out-of-the-box" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Working out of the Box</a>: Archinect featured <a href="http://archinect.com/features/article/106023362/working-out-of-the-box-francis-tsai" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Francis Tsai, of </a><a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Francis-Tsai-Illustration-and-Concept-Design/367692304491?ref_type=bookmark" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Francis Tsai Illustration and Concept Design</a>,&nbsp;who received a Master's degree in 1993 from <a href="http://archinect.com/utsoa" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">University of Texas in Austin</a>.</p><p><strong>Xenaxis</strong>&nbsp;"<em>worked with Francis Tsai at Rockstar games and he was one of t...</em></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/102251007/mini-robots-may-outcompete-3d-printing-in-the-evolution-of-construction Mini-robots may outcompete 3D printing in the evolution of construction Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-06-19T14:59:00-04:00 >2014-06-24T17:52:15-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/63/63cf6ad58829190db98bbc1cdede1533.jpg" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A team of researchers from Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia are working on another solution: A swarm of tiny robots that could cover the construction site of the future, quickly and cheaply building greener buildings of any size. [...] "The robots can work simultaneously while performing different tasks, and having a fixed size they can create objects of virtually any scale, as far as material properties permit&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Check out the Minibuilders in action below:</p><p></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/94341187/consider-the-dumpster Consider the dumpster... Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-02-25T13:38:00-05:00 >2014-03-03T21:08:57-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/fp/fpetglkkr3c4rnzs.jpg" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The long and varied history of waste and its removal in New York from the 18th century onwards is the subject of Elizabeth Royte&rsquo;s 2005 book Garbage Land and of the Urban Omnibus City of Systems video she narrates. In the video, Royte describes how her research into where exactly her trash was going after she threw it out has led her to become a more ecological citizen, with &ldquo;a systems view&rdquo; of our interconnected processes of manufacturing, transportation, disposal and re-use.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/78003651/duke-researchers-design-toilet-that-turns-waste-into-drinking-water Duke researchers design toilet that turns waste into drinking water Archinect 2013-07-26T20:20:00-04:00 >2013-07-29T20:37:41-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/lw/lwwjbtnrl576dptc.jpg" width="514" height="257" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>It works like this: people empty their latrines into a sewage receptacle (currently, latrines are often emptied into rivers), the waste gets funneled through a series of tubes and is pressurized at extreme temperatures, and the byproduct is clean, possibly drinkable water. Deshusses describes the process as &ldquo;a pressure cooker on steroids.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/76898650/turning-waste-into-building-blocks-of-the-future-city Turning waste into building blocks of the future city Archinect 2013-07-12T12:32:00-04:00 >2013-07-15T18:20:10-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/36/36059f19667a0e299db276b373bf23c1.jpg" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>What if the rubbish was refabricated to become real urban spaces or buildings? If it is plausible to adapt current machinery, how much material is available? At first sight, any sanitary landfill may be viewed as an ample supply of building materials. Heavy industrial technologies crush cars or to automatically sort out garbage are readily available. 3-D printing has exhausting capabilities if adjusted to larger scales.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/64433192/150-stories-but-no-sewer-connection 150 stories - but no sewer connection Barry Lehrman 2012-12-30T11:09:00-05:00 >2013-01-01T19:58:14-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/qw/qwgo74b86ongcnjb.jpg" width="514" height="369" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>'[R]emember that a place like Dubai really emerged in the last 50 years. It was a sleepy, you know, Bedouin town half a century ago. And what you do is when you bring in the world&rsquo;s, you know, most sophisticated architects and engineers, you can literally build anything, including a building of 140 or 150 stories. But designing a municipal network of sewage treatment is in some ways more complex. - KATE ASCHER</p></em><br /><br /><p> Terry Gross recently interviewed Kate Ascher about her skyscraper book, and ended up discussing the common lack of sewage connections in Dubai - including the Burj Khalifa. So they end up using trucks to cart the sewage to the central treatment plant, where they often end up queuing for 24-hours or more before they can be emptied.</p> <p> <a href="http://us.gizmodo.com/5857475/without-trucks-the-tallest-building-in-the-world-would-become-the-tallest-mountain-of-poop" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gizmodo </a>calculated:</p> <p> '<em>The Burj Khalifa has 163 habitable floors. It's designed to hold 35,000 people at any given time. Now, humans produce 100 to 250 grams (3 to 8 ounces) of feces per day. Let's say 200 in this case, since these people are well fed. That's 7,000,000 grams per day. Seven tonnes of poop per day. Now, add human-produced liquids (pee, bathing, cleaning their teeth...) and the water to push the poop down its miles of sewage pipes. I think a very conservative total would be 15 tonnes of sewage per day.</em></p> <p> <em>That's a lot of poop.'</em></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/59492930/transforming-freshkills-park-from-landfill-to-landscape Transforming Freshkills Park from Landfill to Landscape Archinect 2012-10-17T12:50:00-04:00 >2012-10-17T19:39:49-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/dd/ddaac606a08da1b339aa99159a9dd287.jpg" width="514" height="384" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Corner&rsquo;s plan identifies&nbsp;five main areas in Freshkills, each with distinct offerings, designed and programmed to maximize&nbsp;specific site opportunities and constraints. Planned features include nature preserves, animal habitats, a seed plot, walking and bike paths, picnic areas, comfort stations, event staging areas, and every other amenity you could possibly ask for in a public park.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/58632366/plan-to-build-uk-s-first-building-entirely-out-of-waste Plan to build UK's first building entirely out of waste Archinect 2012-10-04T19:04:00-04:00 >2012-10-08T18:35:00-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/yb/yb4xtgx1k2cnxije.jpg" width="450" height="383" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Designed by Brighton-based architect Duncan Baker-Brown, it will be built on the University of Brighton's campus in the city centre from waste and surplus material from local building sites and other local industries. The walls will be made of waste timber products. Ply "cassettes" containing waste material will be slotted in between the timber structure. These cassettes will be removable so that new building technologies can be added easily.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/46960200/the-trash-heap-of-history The Trash Heap of History Places Journal 2012-05-01T19:35:00-04:00 >2012-05-06T14:56:02-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/ts/tsqkf7zrgqsoh8bw.jpg" width="514" height="381" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>As contemporary governments and citizens increasingly demand that reclaimed landfills be many things to many people &mdash; energy producers, social nodes, memorials &mdash; and also that they interface with local infrastructure, we would do well to study the historical precedent of Monte Testaccio... [whose] longevity and vitality make it an ideal model of what a landfill can become: an agent of civic engagement and an urban catalyst. This is the promise of landfill reclamation.</p></em><br /><br /><p> The reuse of waste and remediation of landfills have inspired some of the most innovative contemporary landscape and urban design projects. On Places, Michael Ezban looks back two millennia and explores Monte Testaccio, the great garbage dump of imperial Rome. In this enduring landform &mdash; "a mountain of detritus in a city of storied hills" &mdash; he finds a dynamic precedent for landfill reclamation.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/31515616/nyit-students-bring-waste-removal-solutions-to-costa-rica NYIT Students Bring Waste Removal Solutions to Costa Rica Archinect 2011-12-19T18:50:02-05:00 >2011-12-27T11:01:03-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/y8/y8rcpuee7jm9x5d1.jpg" width="514" height="221" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Nine New York Institute of Technology architecture students, three of them from Long Island, will bring their creative designs and skills to Costa Rica to develop a recycling and education center</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/10047594/urban-mining-the-future Urban mining-the future Nam Henderson 2011-06-15T20:32:23-04:00 >2011-11-24T09:05:52-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/n1/n19yowil2h9jci7a.jpg" width="514" height="340" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> The demand for special metals used in the manufacture of electronics is booming, but a few countries control much of the world's supply. Germany is looking to reduce its reliance on imports by exploiting the metal that is thrown away in trash. Urban mining could become big business.&nbsp;</p>