Archinect - News 2016-10-26T00:15:07-04:00 Qatar World Cup workers: FIFA launches welfare body to improve labor conditions Alexander Walter 2016-04-28T17:49:00-04:00 >2016-05-06T00:08:32-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="212" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Fifa president Gianni Infantino has announced the launch of a body to oversee the treatment of workers on Qatar&rsquo;s World Cup stadiums. Fifa has been under pressure from Amnesty International, among others, over the alleged human rights abuses suffered by construction operatives at World Cup venues.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"7,000 construction workers will die in Qatar before a ball is kicked in the 2022 World Cup," new ITUC report finds</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BBC journalists arrested for reporting on Qatar's World Cup laborers</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Revealed: Qatar's World Cup 'slaves' to Build Infrastructure</a></li></ul><p>Dire safety conditions also in Brazil:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">11 workers have died so far during Rio Olympic construction, audit finds</a></p> Zaha Hadid: 'Qatari situation' doesn't apply to her stadium site Alexander Walter 2016-02-02T13:32:00-05:00 >2016-08-23T05:57:21-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="464" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In an interview with The Times, Dame Zaha Hadid said that the Qataris &ldquo;should do something&rdquo; about the issue of migrant workers. [...] &ldquo;I&rsquo;m not a defender of the Qatari situation, but it&rsquo;s important to get the facts right and then we can discuss it. I&rsquo;m very happy that the press make the government aware of problems on certain sites. But it doesn&rsquo;t apply to this site.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>To read the full (paywalled) <em>The Times</em> interview with Dame Hadid, click <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.</p><p>Previously in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"7,000 construction workers will die in Qatar before a ball is kicked in the 2022 World Cup," new ITUC report finds</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Zaha Hadid defends Qatar World Cup role following migrant worker deaths</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">More Bad News with Hadid's Qatar Stadium</a></li></ul> "7,000 construction workers will die in Qatar before a ball is kicked in the 2022 World Cup," new ITUC report finds Alexander Walter 2015-12-29T18:00:00-05:00 >2016-01-17T00:47:19-05:00 <img src="" width="650" height="281" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A report by the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) has estimated that 7,000 workers will die before the first ball is kicked in the 2022 World Cup. [...] &ldquo;Qatar&rsquo;s labour laws are ruinous for workers. All the government has done is to codify slavery. Employers can now even lend out workers to another employer without the worker&rsquo;s consent for up to a year&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>In its 2015 report <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><em>Qatar: Profit and Loss. Counting the cost of modern day slavery in Qatar: What price freedom?</em></a>, the ITUC demands that FIFA would make workers' right a central concern of the 2022 World Cup preparations. The organization has also called on Qatari authorities to take these immediate steps to improve workers' conditions:</p><ul><li>End the kafala system starting with the elimination of the exit visa;</li><li>Allow worker representation &ndash; a collective voice with elected representatives and workplace committees;</li><li>Employment contracts through direct employment or large, reputable, recruitment companies;</li><li>A national minimum wage for all workers, and collective bargaining rights;</li><li>Proper labor inspection and grievance mechanisms, inclusive of contractors, and an independent labor court.</li></ul><p>Click <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a> to read the full report.</p><p>Previously in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BBC journalists arrested for reporting on Qatar's World Cup laborers</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A Memorial for the Workers Dying While Constructing the Qatar World Cup Stadium</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Qa...</a></li></ul> Photographer captures the landscapes of the Middle East's 'brutal building sites' Nicholas Korody 2015-06-17T13:37:00-04:00 >2015-06-22T20:21:30-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="352" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>When most people think of the Arabian peninsula, they think of the opulent man-made islands of Dubai and that city&rsquo;s sparking, futuristic towers... But with his series Crossings, Arko Datto&nbsp;shifts the attention to the millions of migrant workers from throughout Asia who are building these structures. Datto used Google Maps and Google Earth to capture the vast highways, sprawling&nbsp;landscapes, and grand projects that laborers have built under conditions that border on slavery.</p></em><br /><br /><p>&ldquo;The work deals with the issue in a fairly abstract/tangential way,&rdquo; Datto told Wired Magazine. &ldquo;The total lack of human presence in the images is symbolic of the anonymity, facelessness, and lack of representation that the migrant workers suffer.&rdquo;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> BBC journalists arrested for reporting on Qatar's World Cup laborers Alexander Walter 2015-05-19T14:00:00-04:00 >2015-05-19T19:51:19-04:00 <img src="" width="624" height="351" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>We were invited to Qatar by the prime minister's office to see new flagship accommodation for low-paid migrant workers in early May - but while gathering additional material for our report, we ended up being thrown into prison for doing our jobs. Our arrest was dramatic.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A Memorial for the Workers Dying While Constructing the Qatar World Cup Stadium</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">World Cup &lsquo;slaves&rsquo; scandal: Qatar holds 2 UK rights researchers over &lsquo;emigration violations&rsquo;</a></li></ul> Albert Speer talks about the Qatar World Cup and the search for sustainability Alexander Walter 2015-01-21T18:33:00-05:00 >2015-01-23T13:34:02-05:00 <img src="" width="650" height="434" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Does it make sense for Qatar to host the 2022 World Cup? German architect Albert Speer, whose office is in charge of the project, says yes -- and is doing all he can to ensure sustainability. In a SPIEGEL interview, he says how.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Desert sands, soccer, sustainability and "symbolic capital"...</a></p> A Memorial for the Workers Dying While Constructing the Qatar World Cup Stadium Nicholas Korody 2014-12-18T15:22:00-05:00 >2014-12-20T17:09:23-05:00 <img src="" width="650" height="444" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Qatar&nbsp;World&nbsp;Cup&nbsp;Memorial project is a scalable building that raises awareness about the number of workers who died during the construction of the stadiums for the 2022&nbsp;World&nbsp;Cup&nbsp;in Qatar. It is in the form of a tower made of concrete modules, each one representing a deceased worker. The higher the number, the higher the tower...If the death rate is not reduced, the Qatar&nbsp;World&nbsp;Cup&nbsp;Memorial could reach a height of 1.5 kilometers (nearly a mile).</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">1W1P</a> &ndash; 1Week1Project &ndash; is a collaborative effort by French architects Axel de Stampa and Sylvain Macaux, graduates of l'Ecole d'Architecture in Paris-Belleville. They challenged themselves to produce a "spontaneous architecture" per week for a year, or fifty-two projects. At this point, they have produced 25 predominately-speculative projects, from this memorial to the workers who have died (and are continuing to die) while constructing the World Cup Stadium for the 2022 World Cup in Qatar to an ephemeral installation for the interior of the Eiffel Tower that would light up every time someone used #eiffeltower on social media.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>With the Qatar World Cup Memorial, they invoke the memories of the<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"> more than 500</a> foreign workers who have died in the country since 2012. While Zaha Hadid, designer of the World Cup Stadium in Qatar, has become the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">subject of controversy</a> for alleged statements rejecting an architect's responsibility for conditions on their projects, 1W1P proposes a distinctly d...</p> World Cup ‘slaves’ scandal: Qatar holds 2 UK rights researchers over ‘emigration violations’ Miles Jaffe 2014-09-08T14:44:00-04:00 >2014-09-09T09:06:22-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="366" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Qatari authorities have confirmed they are holding two British researchers who are investigating the 2022 World Cup facilities, which is linked with a scandal over poor working conditions and dozens of deaths of foreign workers. ... "All of the actions that have been taken against the two Britons are consistent with principles of human rights enshrined in the constitution," read the statement released by the Qatari QNA news agency on Sunday.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The silence from Zaha is deafening.&nbsp;</p> Weekly News Round-Up for July 28, 2014: Exploding pipelines and contentious museums Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-08-04T14:58:00-04:00 >2014-08-04T20:19:26-04:00 <img src="" width="553" height="369" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><strong>Friday, August 1</strong></p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gas Pipelines Explode in Taiwan City Killing&nbsp;24</a>: The cause of the propene pipeline explosion is <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">still unknown</a>, but officials noticed irregularities in the pipe's flow hours beforehand, without investigating further.</li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Jacko's Neverland Ranch is up for sale at $50-75M</a>: Michael Jackson's Disneyland-esque compound in Santa Barbara was handed back to Tom Barrack's Colony Capital in 2008, when Jackson was heavily in debt. With $5M in annual upkeep, Colony Capital is now selling the property.&nbsp;</li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Plans approved for Damien Hirst's village on the British coast</a>: Hirst will collaborate with&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Architects Rundell Associates</a>&nbsp;on the 75-home city. Renderings are surprisingly conventional when compared to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hirst's work</a>.</li></ul><p><strong>Thursday, July 31</strong></p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New Renderings of What Will Replace Grafitti Art Mecca 5Pointz Emerge</a>: Unsurprisingly, it's two residential towers: with some mixed-use space on the ground floor, and 20% affordable housing. Designed by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">HTO Architect</a>, the buildings will have some space set asid...</li></ul> More Bad News with Hadid's Qatar Stadium Nicholas Korody 2014-07-30T15:02:00-04:00 >2014-08-04T21:56:04-04:00 <img src="" width="460" height="276" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Migrant workers building the first stadium for Qatar's 2022 World Cup have been earning as little as 45p [&asymp;75&cent;] an hour, the Guardian can reveal [...] More than 100 workers from some of the world's poorest countries are labouring in ferocious desert heat on the 40,000-seat al-Wakrah stadium, which has been designed by the British architect Zaha Hadid [..]</p></em><br /><br /><p>This is just the most recent in a slew of bad PR for the British-Iraqi architect. Earlier, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">she was rebuked</a> for asserting that architects have neither power over nor responsibility for the conditions of workers on their buildings. <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">She won the 2014 Design Museum award for a building in&nbsp;Azerbaijan</a> that has been criticized for both its construction practices and more generally for being a symbol of support for the country's dictatorial leader. Her designs for a new stadium in Tokyo were called <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">too big, too expensive, and inappropriate for its urban context.&nbsp;</a>&nbsp;And the awarding of the Iraqi Parliament project to her <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">was also met with controversy</a>&nbsp;(the emerging Islamic State is probably threatening the viability of the project anyway).</p><p>Still, ZHA don't seem to have any trouble finding clients!</p> Qatar introduces higher standards for World Cup migrant workers Orhan Ayyüce 2014-02-11T18:43:00-05:00 >2014-02-11T19:08:41-05:00 <img src="" width="650" height="433" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The organising committee for the Qatar 2022 World Cup has promised that contractors who build its stadiums will be held to high standards on the welfare of migrant workers, in the wake of trenchant and sustained criticism. But the promises, made after demands for a progress update from football's governing body Fifa, do not deal with wider concerns about workers engaged in the &pound;137bn construction boom underpinning World Cup infrastructure.</p></em><br /><br /><p>After the accidental death of over 185 Nepali workers' death, Qatar has obliged to introduce new standards to avoid further pressure from the international community.</p><p><em>However, it only deals with the construction of the stadiums, which is due to begin in earnest this year.&nbsp;</em></p> Unnecessary Muffness; Jon Stewart discusses Zaha's "f**kable buildings" Nam Henderson 2013-11-20T17:26:00-05:00 >2013-11-25T00:10:58-05:00 <img src="" width="650" height="368" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>"designed by famed architect Zaha Hadid whose signature style appears to be making some of the world's most f**kable Georgia O'Keeffe of things you can walk inside...i guess maybe it is time things evened out a bit" - Jon Stewart</p></em><br /><br /><p> <img alt="" src="" title=""></p> <p> Last night on The Daily Show, they offered a critique of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Qatar's recently released plans for the Al Wakrah 2022 FIFA World Cup Stadium, designed by Zaha Hadid Architects</a>. The show goes on to label the proposal one of the world's most f**kable soccer stadiums. Also while reporting in, on assignment Al Madrigal is unable to find the "press box".</p> Revealed: Qatar's World Cup 'slaves' to Build Infrastructure Quilian Riano 2013-09-26T13:08:00-04:00 >2013-09-29T09:43:49-04:00 <img src="" width="630" height="433" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>"We'd like to leave, but the company won't let us,"</p></em><br /><br /><p> "We'd like to leave, but the company won't let us," said one Nepalese migrant employed at Lusail City development, a $45bn (&pound;28bn) city being built from scratch which will include the 90,000-seater stadium that will host the World Cup final. "I'm angry about how this company is treating us, but we're helpless. I regret coming here, but what to do? We were compelled to come just to make a living, but we've had no luck."</p> <p> <img alt="" src="" title=""></p> <p> The body tasked with organising the World Cup, the Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee, told the Guardian that work had yet to begin on projects directly related to the World Cup. However, it said it was "deeply concerned with the allegations that have been made against certain contractors/sub-contractors working on Lusail City's construction site and considers this issue to be of the utmost seriousness". It added: "We have been informed that the relevant government authorities are conducting an investigation into the allegations."</p> <p> <img alt="" src="" title=""></p> Desert sands, soccer, sustainability and "symbolic capital"... Nam Henderson 2012-06-01T23:55:00-04:00 >2015-01-21T18:47:59-05:00 <img src="" width="650" height="459" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In December 2009, at the "SportAccord" marketing trade show held in Denver, a pair of young Qataris walked up to the Albert Speer &amp; Partners booth, flipped through the brochures and soon realized that the Frankfurt-based firm specialized in very large-scale projects with a focus on sustainability.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Alexander Smoltczyk interviewed Albert Speer Jr. in connection with Qatar's bid for the 2022 World Cup, &nbsp;designed by Speer's Frankfurt based firm. More interested in "<strong>intelligent cities</strong>" than simple architectural objects, the firm&nbsp;does and offers everything, from the big-picture concepts down to detailed plans. As for questions about patronage, politics and democracy Speer believes "<em>Generally speaking, Germans should be able to work in countries with a German embassy." </em>Additionally, Alexander writes that the current building race seen in the Gulf region is all about "<strong>symbolic capital</strong>", "<strong>sustainable power and sustainable spectacle</strong>".</p>