Archinect - News 2017-04-30T06:43:45-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/150003415/imagining-the-popular-elena-ferrante-novel-my-brilliant-friend-as-a-building Imagining the popular Elena Ferrante novel "My Brilliant Friend" as a building Nicholas Korody 2017-04-17T18:00:00-04:00 >2017-04-17T18:02:58-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/2n/2np6pj146hgfkzik.jpg" width="650" height="503" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Tension and compression often meld into each another. In this&nbsp;building, two volumes are interwoven by strong connecting rods, extended columns and daring&nbsp;beams, with one of the two seemingly suspended from the other. With its mass and swirled&nbsp;dynamism, the suspended volume (that we will call&nbsp;Lila) seems to be slipping away from the one&nbsp;that is holding it up (that we will call&nbsp;Elena) making it extend and stretch as if it was Lila that was&nbsp;shaping Elena and providing her with her dynamic energy...</p></em><br /><br /><p><em>The name of this architectural complex is </em>My Brilliant Friend<em>, after Elena Ferrante&rsquo;s novel in which the relationship between its two protagonists (Elena, the narrating voice, and her childhood friend Lila) is a constant, alternating flux of blurred identities and imperfect dreams.</em></p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/co/con4vyhbc224raxy.jpg"></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/149982770/investigating-the-literary-and-sociopolitical-implications-of-the-skyscraper Investigating the literary and sociopolitical implications of the skyscraper Julia Ingalls 2016-12-14T20:32:00-05:00 >2016-12-21T22:18:29-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/94/94b54r0kfzczv9p5.jpg" width="650" height="423" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>So I&rsquo;d argue that the birth of the middle class, or the managerial middle class, is in some ways tied to the invention of the skyscraper.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Before the skyscraper, looking down at people from great heights was more of a figurative state of mind than an actual experience. But afterwards, the notion of people as dots on a landscape went beyond just a slangy Georges Seurat reference and became a Thing. But what were the ramifications of this change? How did novelists respond to the new structures, and what did those responses say about society and the influence of the skyscraper?</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/oq/oq1nl8dn6fc5pnvz.jpg"></p><p>"[Henry James] tried to give the skyscraper a chance; he imagined seeing it and falling in love with it, but he really kind of ultimately dismissed it again&nbsp;as ugly, unaesthetic, a horrible structure that&rsquo;s also destroying the ways that we tell stories and destroying the intimacy that his kinds of stories require," says Adrienne Brown, an Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago whose forthcoming book, "The Black Skyscraper" explores just about every cultural ramification of the skyscraper one can imagine.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/xz/xzitcocj72upkoso.jpg"></p><p>In this extended interview with <a href="https://daily.jstor.org/black-skyscraper-interview-adrienne-brown/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">JSto...</a></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/149964792/changing-architectural-ideals-as-illustrated-through-child-literature Changing architectural ideals as illustrated through child literature Julia Ingalls 2016-08-23T14:22:00-04:00 >2016-09-01T23:05:33-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/dc/dc2b8sr3khpovxtn.jpg" width="590" height="726" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In this fascinating piece by Rumaan Ali for&nbsp;<a href="http://www.slate.com/blogs/nightlight/2016/08/23/from_goodnight_moon_to_richard_scarry_the_great_rooms_of_children_s_literature.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Slate</a>, he explores how children's picture books offer a fun historical survey of the ideal architecture and interior decor for each place and time, spanning from the early 20th century to contemporary times. Although the books usually incorporate some element of fantasy, the throw rugs, <a href="http://archinect.com/features/tag/701490/furniture-february" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">furniture</a>, and division of space tend to be reflective of the real world of that era.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/82/82c09314xolrw28l.jpg"></p><p>As Ali writes about the "Best Storybook Ever" by Richard Scarry:</p><p>"The silhouettes of the sofas in the living room and the attic den are similar. This is not a home of ostentatious decorative gestures, but one of comfort, a faith in the modern culture (the television, the record player, a single book, from the Book of the Month Club, no doubt, left out on the coffee table). We see the home at the start of the day: one son lacing up his shoes, mother working on breakfast. The house is awake, alive with an optimism about what the day, the decade, the century holds for the peopl...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/126435207/future-cities-of-the-past Future cities of the past Alexander Walter 2015-04-29T18:17:00-04:00 >2015-05-04T21:17:38-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/58/58f7a7cadfe54f27fa968e49e9d2a21a.jpg" width="650" height="455" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>But supplementing that aesthetic of &ldquo;the future&rdquo; sketched in imaginary edifice, the full SF vision of the future city is a mosaic, constructed from fragments of the cities that we recognize, including symbols that are decidedly from the past. [...] If SF functions by taking the world we know and altering it with a constructed future fantasy, the Statue of Liberty serves as the junction point, the axis where the speculative fantasy begins and ends.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/101654926/constructing-holden-caulfield-learning-to-build-character-through-literary-architecture "Constructing Holden Caulfield": Learning to build character through literary architecture Justine Testado 2014-06-12T18:22:00-04:00 >2014-06-21T00:35:29-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/u7/u750yubvdyxyhxq5.jpg" width="650" height="434" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The writer and the architect aren't so different from each other when you consider each one as builders of an environment, and what better way to introduce that concept than to a class of high school students. After reading about <a href="http://www.matteopericoli.com" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Matteo Pericoli'</a>s "The Laboratory of Literary Architecture" course in <em>The New York Times</em>, English teacher George Mayo was inspired to teach it to his 10th grade class at Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring, MD.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/gl/glzlbogp55s1d0vb.jpg"></p><p>Matteo Pericoli created and taught the workshop in the Scuola Holden creative writing school in Turin, Italy and then in the M.F.A. writing program at <a href="http://archinect.com/schools/cover/3109814/columbia-university" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Columbia University</a>'s School of the Arts. Students picked a literary work they closely understood and then broke it down to its core elements, from which they based their architectural designs.</p><p>The goal was for students to avoid literal&nbsp;representations and instead design&nbsp;<em>literary</em> representations that symbolize "the essential ideas of the narrative structure in a spatial form," as described in P...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/78820430/what-happens-when-we-ask-writers-to-try-their-hand-at-architecture What happens when we ask writers to try their hand at architecture? anthony dong 2013-08-06T11:26:00-04:00 >2013-08-14T11:30:26-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/vf/vfqu87lxbjvivknn.jpg" width="592" height="395" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Great architects build structures that can make us feel enclosed, liberated or suspended. They lead us through space, make us slow down, speed up or stop to contemplate. Great writers, in devising their literary structures, do exactly the same. So what happens when we ask writers to try their hand at architecture?</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/49138322/a-sneak-peek-of-the-new-architecture-obsessed-batman-graphic-novel A sneak peek of the new architecture-obsessed Batman graphic novel Archinect 2012-05-22T14:17:00-04:00 >2012-05-22T14:38:33-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/df/df5a18c3da0609af47914bb5499a07a7.jpg" width="640" height="360" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Gotham City is undergoing one of the most expansive construction booms in its history. The most prestigious architects from across the globe have buildings in various phases of completion all over town. As chairman of the Gotham Landmarks Commission, Bruce Wayne has been a key part of this boom, which signals a golden age of architectural ingenuity for the city. And then, the explosions begin.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd"> <html><head><meta></head></html> http://archinect.com/news/article/69473/whenever-you-are-we-re-already-then "Whenever you are, we're already then" Israel Kandarian 2008-01-07T13:36:00-05:00 >2014-12-04T12:09:43-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/650x/cr/criccgby9bi36roh.jpg" width="650" height="867" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><a href="http://www.826la.org/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">826</a>&nbsp;opens up its second <a href="http://www.latimes.com/features/books/la-et-eggers31dec31,1,678496.story?page=1" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Los Angeles area center</a>, designed and built by archinector, Scott Mitchell. 826 is a "free literacy and writing center for kids that was started by author Dave Eggers in San Francisco," with centers in New York, Chicago, Ann Arbor, Seattle, and Boston. 826 is always looking for volunteers and tutors.</p><p><img src="http://www.826la.com/img/1714sunset/1210/12_10_196_t.jpg"></p>