Archinect - News 2015-10-07T13:42:25-04:00 Partygoers have a blast at the Architectural League's 2015 Beaux Arts Ball Justine Testado 2015-09-22T09:48:00-04:00 >2015-09-22T12:23:09-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Architects, designers, and artists gathered at the Knockdown Center in Queens last Friday night for the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Architectural League of New York</a>'s <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Beaux Arts Ball 2015</a>. Co-chaired by Vishaan Chakrabarti of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">SHoP Architects</a> and Maria Alataris,&nbsp;this year's "Threshold" theme kicks off another cultural year for The Architectural League and the New York design community. It also nods to the industrial history of the Knockdown Center, a former doorframe factory that was restored into an arts and performance space.&nbsp;</p><p>Every year, guests dress up, boogie down, socialize, and enjoy refreshments alongside fellow architects, all while helping support the League's programs.&nbsp;</p><p>Here's a glimpse of this year's party.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Inside the Knockdown Center's 50,000 square foot, 40-foot high spaces, the design offices of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Alibi Studio</a>, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MODU</a>, and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Moorhead &amp; Moorhead</a> created site-specific &ldquo;threshold&rdquo; installations to play up the industrial space of the Knockdown.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Check out photos from <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">2014: Craft</a>&nbsp;and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">2013: -isms</a>.</p>... Dwell on Design New York returns to SoHo, Oct. 2-4. Register now! Sponsor 2015-09-19T10:00:00-04:00 >2015-10-02T13:30:26-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="338" border="0" title="" alt="" /><br><em><strong>This post is brought to you by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Dwell on Design New York</a>.</strong></em><br>&nbsp;<p>Now in its second year, the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">2015 Dwell on Design New York</a> tradeshow will inhabit the Skylight Clarkson Square in the heart of SoHo, NYC on October 2-4. Join 5,000 members of the design community as Dwell upends the standard 'trade show' format to create a unique forum on the future of design.</p><p>New York City is a design laboratory &mdash; one that constantly reinvents its landscape while embracing new ideas and possibilities. Curated by the editors of Dwell magazine, Dwell on Design NY (DODNY) shares that ethos by constructing a forum for unique ideas and a fresh point of view. Dwell on Design NY will dive deep with commercial designers, architects, manufacturers, makers, and you. Together, we&rsquo;ll evaluate design, solve problems, and innovate using&nbsp;research, technology, and ingenuity.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>At the core of this discourse lies&nbsp;the concept of authentic design and its far-reaching position in the modern furniture cosmos. Additionally, Dwell editor...</p> Eero Saarinen's dormant JFK terminal to become Jet Blue hotel Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-18T12:33:00-04:00 >2015-09-21T17:22:47-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>JetBlue and MCR will build hotel rooms from the ground up next to the terminal and refurbish the interior of the building to become the property&rsquo;s main entrance. [...] It is to have 505 rooms, 40,000 square feet of meeting space, up to eight eateries and an observation deck. The old terminal will serve as the lobby, with the rest of the hotel set back from it in a new building.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Jet Blue's hotel will be JFK's first, finally utilizing Saarinen's masterpiece after 14 years (and counting) of vacancy.</p><p>For more news at JFK:</p><ul><li><a title="Fancy $48M animal terminal to open in JFK Airport next year" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Fancy $48M animal terminal to open in JFK Airport next year</a></li><li><a title="JetBlue tapped as prospective developer for JFK TWA terminal" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">JetBlue tapped as prospective developer for JFK TWA terminal</a></li><li><a title="Hotelier, Andre Balazs, to convert JFK&rsquo;s historic TWA terminal into a hotel and conference center" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hotelier, Andre Balazs, to convert JFK&rsquo;s historic TWA terminal into a hotel and conference center</a></li></ul> Urban fingerprints reveal a city's fundamental character and composition Julia Ingalls 2015-09-17T15:10:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:36:47-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="325" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Like humans, cities and neighborhoods have their own unique fingerprints. The maps were created by researchers at the center&rsquo;s Urban Age program, who have been studying how the layout of rapidly urbanizing cities can affect their livability.</p></em><br /><br /><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New York</a> is a grid, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">London</a> is an airy whirl, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hong Kong</a> is dense: at least, that's according to the black and white "fingerprint" maps put together by the Urban Age program at the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">London School of Economics and Political Science</a>. The project helps researches see at a glance the macroscopic characteristics of urban environments, from density to wealth disparity to room for growth. The project has profiled urban centers all around the world, including <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Rio de Janeiro</a> and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mumbai</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For news about other innovative designs using aerially-compiled urban patterns, do read:</p><p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">UpStarts: Four O Nine architecture and design</a></p> What a starchitectural skyline means for the future of New York Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-14T14:25:00-04:00 >2015-09-14T18:25:47-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The latest explosion of Manhattan development has fully and passionately embraced the phenomenon of the global starchitect. [...] As it turned out, the future would be pure real estate ... The future was the privatisation of the sky and a transfer from corporate power to individual wealth, the visual manifestation of the 0.1 per cent. It was a catwalk of anorexic skinnyscrapers by the equivalents of haute-couture designers ... global names with which to sell real estate.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Win 2 tickets to the ArchLeague's Beaux Arts Ball 2015: THRESHOLD on September 18 in NY Justine Testado 2015-09-11T14:51:00-04:00 >2015-09-14T22:06:02-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="514" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Tickets are already <a href=";eventId=6148725" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">on sale</a> for the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Architectural League of New York</a>'s <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Beaux Arts Ball 2015: Threshold</a>, happening at the Knockdown Center in Queens on Friday evening, September 18. Join fellow architects, designers, and artists in one of the most highly anticipated events for the New York design community.</p><p>If you haven't secured tickets yet, you're in luck because Archinect is giving away two pairs of tickets to two of our readers! (Two tickets per winner.)</p><p><strong>TO ENTER THE GIVEAWAY:</strong></p><p>Respond to the following question in the comment section below by Monday, September 14: What appeals to you most about the 2015 Beaux Arts Ball?</p><p>Only your first comment will count. Two winners will be announced on Tuesday, September 15.</p><p><img alt="" src=""></p><p>Co-chaired by architects <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Vishaan Chakrabarti</a> and Maria Alataris this year, the "Threshold" theme gives a hats off to the start of another cultural year for the League and the wider New York design community. It's also a play on the specific industrial history of the Knockdown Cen...</p> 7th annual Architecture & Design Film Festival coming to New York in October Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-09T14:34:00-04:00 >2015-09-09T14:46:43-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="341" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>From October 13-18, check out 33 films being screened for limited time as part of the Architecture &amp; Design Film Festival in New York City. Taking place at a few select theaters in Chelsea, the Festival will screen films featuring Bjarke Ingels "8 House", London's infamous brutalist Barbican Arts Centre and Estate, the New York Pavilion at the 1964/5&nbsp;World's Fair, and documentaries on architects David Adjaye, Henning Larsen, and Gottfried B&ouml;hm, among many others.</p><p>The Festival will also feature panel discussions, guided architecture walks and a virtual/augmented reality lounge.</p><p>For a complete list of films and a screening schedule, click <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> The Architectural League announces the Beaux Arts Ball 2015: Threshold Justine Testado 2015-09-03T21:57:00-04:00 >2015-09-04T14:15:21-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="514" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Over 1,000 architects, designers, and artists will gather for a night of festivities at the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Architectural League of New York</a>'s Beaux Arts Ball 2015: Threshold, taking place on September 18 at the Knockdown Center in Queens, New York City. Since the League revived the event in 1990 to fundraise support for their programs, the Beaux Arts Ball has grown into a highly anticipated event for the New York design community and friends. The League picks a different venue every year that is architecturally historic and based within the city's five boroughs.</p><p>Co-chaired by architects <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Vishaan Chakrabarti</a> and Maria Alataris this year, the "Threshold" theme gives a hats off to the start of another cultural year for the League and the wider New York design community. It also draws inspiration from the specific industrial history of the Knockdown Center &mdash; a former doorframe factory restored into an artist/performance space.</p><p>Inside the factory&rsquo;s 50,000 square foot, 40-foot high spaces, the design offic...</p> Moscow, Russia voted world's unfriendliest city by travelers Julia Ingalls 2015-09-02T14:33:00-04:00 >2015-09-02T14:33:45-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>We suspect the city&rsquo;s notoriously bad traffic and general &ldquo;aloofness&rdquo; of the people contributed to its low ranking, as well as its culinary scene, which was also ranked dead last in this year&rsquo;s poll.</p></em><br /><br /><p>When Travel + Leisure compiled a survey of the places its readers love to visit, it also collected data on the 30 locales they loathe. While Moscow, Russia tops the list of the world's unfriendliest cities, a significant number of the top 10 are located in the United States (including <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Los Angeles</a>, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New York City</a>, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Philadelphia</a>, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Baltimore</a>, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Las Vegas</a> and the world's #2 unfriendliest burg,&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Atlantic City</a>).&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Lonely Planet names Queens, NY the No. 1 travel spot in the US for 2015 Nicholas Korody 2015-08-26T16:13:00-04:00 >2015-08-27T20:38:06-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="372" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Lonely Planet made a decision in December that stunned many in the travel industry, even those deeply invested in promoting the borough. It named Queens the No. 1 travel destination in the United States for 2015. Yes, Queens. Not Miami, the Grand Canyon, Washington, San Francisco or, more to the point, Manhattan, but rather New York City&rsquo;s equivalent of a flyover state, perhaps most famous for two sitcoms, one featuring a food-fixated deliveryman and the other a xenophobic bigot.</p></em><br /><br /><p>According to data from&nbsp;NYC &amp; Company, the city&rsquo;s tourism marketing agency, the amount of visitors to the outer borough increased around 12 percent in a single year, between 2012 and 2013. Queens is also reported to be in the midst of a major hotel building boom, with five new ones opening last year alone.</p> Extending an abandoned vocabulary: The New Yorker profiles Robert A.M. Stern Alexander Walter 2015-08-24T15:12:00-04:00 >2015-08-26T19:31:21-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="727" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>New York has seen twenty-first-century buildings in early-twentieth-century drag before, but 30 Park Place stands out, both for its size [...] and for its location&mdash;cheek-by-jowl with some of the most ambitious buildings to emerge from the current high-rise boom [...] &ldquo;We&rsquo;re transposing a nineteen-thirties language to lower Manhattan, which has gotten overrun with glass and abstraction,&rdquo; the architect said in a recent interview. &ldquo;People want to look at buildings and make connections.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Robert A.M. Stern Architects in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" target="_blank">Robert A.M. Stern to step down as Dean of Yale School of Architecture</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">This $250M mega penthouse might become New York's priciest home</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">NYC&rsquo;s Most Expensive Condo to Be Listed at $130 Million</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">"Unfashionably Fashionable" - Justin Davidson on Robert A.M. Stern&rsquo;s Buildings</a></li></ul> Building New York City's sixth borough Alexander Walter 2015-08-18T11:40:00-04:00 >2015-08-24T21:54:11-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="348" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>If it is possible, financially and technologically, to build a three-acre park in the river west of New York City, then why isn&rsquo;t it possible to construct an artificial island at a higher elevation than downtown Manhattan that would serve as New York City&rsquo;s sixth borough? Many of the city&rsquo;s problems&mdash;real estate prices, developers purchasing blocks at a time, the astronomical cost of parking a car, or even a bicycle, even shoreline erosion&mdash;are problems of space. So why not just build more space?</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Visions of LoLo, a Neighborhood Rising From Landfill</a></p> This 3D map compares NYC real estate prices by neighborhood DianePham 2015-08-17T12:24:00-04:00 >2015-08-24T21:42:16-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="314" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>We all have a pretty good idea which NYC neighborhoods command top dollar, but this incredible 3D map from NeighborhoodX really puts things into perspective by pinning the city&rsquo;s 325 neighborhoods against one another in a visually jarring side-by-side comparison. Among the most expensive? In Brooklyn...</p></em><br /><br /><p>More on New York real estate:</p><ul><li><a title="The rise of communal living in New York" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The rise of communal living in New York</a></li><li><a title="This $250M mega penthouse might become New York's priciest home" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">This $250M mega penthouse might become New York's priciest home</a></li><li><a title="New York &amp; London ranked highest in 2015 Global Cities Index" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New York &amp; London ranked highest in 2015 Global Cities Index</a></li><li><a title="NYC's public-housing woes" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">NYC's public-housing woes</a></li></ul> Data Crunching the Uberization of New York City Nicholas Korody 2015-08-12T12:59:00-04:00 >2015-08-13T18:42:14-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="859" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The recent debate between Uber and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio over whether the ride-for-hire company was exacerbating Manhattan congestion was fueled by incomplete, misleading data. There was no way of knowing exactly where Uber cars and taxis pick up passengers, and so the city agreed to a study of Uber&rsquo;s effects last month as part of its detente with the company. Now, thanks in part to a Freedom of Information Law request, we have data. A lot of data...</p></em><br /><br /><p>The folks over at <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">FiveThirtyEight</a>&nbsp;processed a nearly-overwhelming amount of data on Uber usage in New York City and got some pretty interesting (if not entirely surprising) results. At the top of the list, their research verifies the ride-share company's claims that their doing a better job in serving the city's Outer Boroughs than traditional cabs. "Of the 4.4 million Uber rides for which the data shows a pickup location, 22 percent started outside of Manhattan, compared with just 14 percent of the 88.4 million yellow and green taxi rides," they note.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Some other findings include:</p><ul><li>63% of all Uber rides start in Manhattan south of 59th St. (the most traffic-congested area in the city, &nbsp;as well as the part best-served by the subway).&nbsp;</li><li>Uber is particularly well-used in the affluent NW Bronx neighborhood of Riverdale, as well as the NE Queens neighborhoods of Little Neck and College Point, while traditional taxis remain dominant in the regions of Queens closest to Manhattan.</li><li>In general, man...</li></ul> Create sonic architecture with mesh, music, and lights at the New Museum this weekend Justine Testado 2015-08-06T14:50:00-04:00 >2015-08-09T10:34:30-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="322" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Museum displays are typically meant to be seen and not touched, but a recent wave of exhibitions is upending those rules. Take DELQA, an interactive music and light installation opening in the New Museum's NEW INC space on August 6. Showcasing the music of Matthew Dear combined with Microsoft's Kinect technology, the project allows participants to touch, push and poke suspended mesh walls to manipulate a musical composition, creating their own unique experience of the space.</p></em><br /><br /><p>If you're on the hunt for weekend plans in NYC, DELQA will be at the New Museum only from August 6-9!</p><p>More on Archinect:</p><p><a title="How architecture helped music evolve - David Byrne " href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">How architecture helped music evolve - David Byrne </a></p><p><a title="Frank Gehry: Is Music Liquid Architecture?" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Frank Gehry: Is Music Liquid Architecture?</a></p><p><a title="How an &quot;egalitarian incubator&quot; music venue hopes to revive Brooklyn's art scene" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">How an "egalitarian incubator" music venue hopes to revive Brooklyn's art scene</a></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"Soundscape New York" captures the sounds of NYC's iconic buildings</a></p><p><a title="Jam to your heart's desire with Stereotank's &quot;Heartbeat&quot; installation in Times Square " href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Jam to your heart's desire with Stereotank's "Heartbeat" installation in Times Square </a></p> The rise of communal living in New York Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-08-03T12:46:00-04:00 >2015-08-03T20:36:37-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Pure House is among a handful of businesses that are renting rooms at a premium in exchange for access to amenities, a dormlike atmosphere and an instant community. For a certain set of New Yorkers, often new arrivals to the city with an income but no rental history, Pure House offers something of a reprieve. [...] The arrangement is a commercial outgrowth of co-living, taking life with roommates to a different level.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More news from the New York City residential market:</p><ul><li><a title="NYC's public-housing woes" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">NYC's public-housing woes</a></li><li><a title="Married Couples Take on Roomies to Adapt to Sky-High NY Rents" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Married Couples Take on Roomies to Adapt to Sky-High NY Rents</a></li><li><a title="111 West 57th Street: The World&rsquo;s Skinniest Tower Will Also Be the Hemisphere&rsquo;s Tallest Residential Building" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">111 West 57th Street: The World&rsquo;s Skinniest Tower Will Also Be the Hemisphere&rsquo;s Tallest Residential Building</a></li><li><a title='This New "Steampunk" Luxury Apartment Building for New York Should Fill You With Unbearable Shame' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">This New "Steampunk" Luxury Apartment Building for New York Should Fill You With Unbearable Shame</a></li></ul> Get a peek inside Pratt's new Film/Video Department building by WASA/Studio A Justine Testado 2015-07-10T19:58:00-04:00 >2015-07-12T21:14:22-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>After occupying a lower-level space in one of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Pratt Institute</a>'s athletic buildings, prospects are looking bright and shiny for Pratt's <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Film/Video Department</a> as it settles into its new home on 550 Myrtle Avenue in Brooklyn. The 15,000 square-foot facility was fully gutted and redesigned by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">WASA/Studio A</a>, whose project team happens to include Pratt alumni like Jack Esterson as lead architect; senior associate Sebastian Touzet as partner-in-charge for design; and project architect Brian Dobrolsky. The $4.5 million renovation began last July.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Built using free-span trusses, the new space has 23-foot ceiling heights and no internal columns. Pratt Architecture Professor and artist Haresh Lalvani created a series of perforated metal panels that wrap around the entrance lobby and cover the walls of the first and second floors. The customized panels display Lalvani's signature eye-popping patterns that are typically seen in his <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">sculptural works</a>.</p><p>Formerly known as the Prattstore building, the ne...</p> Poor Doors of Perception: discriminatory design, collapsing balconies, and virtual realities on Archinect Sessions #36 Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-07-02T20:11:00-04:00 >2015-07-17T14:36:09-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="333" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>This week, we dip into the swamp of whether so-called "poor doors" (separate entrances for affordable and market-rate housing tenants) are discriminatory, highlighting discussion points made in the wake of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New York's decision to make them illegal</a>. We also follow up on the investigation into a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">balcony collapse in Berkeley, California</a> that led to six deaths, and ask Brian Newman, Archinect Sessions' Legal Correspondent, what legal recourse is possible for everyone involved.</p><p>Virtual built environment wizards Thomas Hirschmann and Anthony Murray, founders of documentation and preservation firm <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Third Fate</a>, also join us for an interview. Their work seeks to document, preserve and activate the built environment through virtual realities.</p><p>Listen to episode thirty-six of&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>Archinect Sessions</strong></a>, "Poor Doors of Perception":</p><ul><li><strong>iTunes</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Click here to listen</a>, and click the "Subscribe" button below the logo to automatically download new episodes.</li><li><strong>Apple Podcast App (iOS)</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="pcast://" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">click here to subscribe</a></li><li><strong>Stitcher</strong>:&nbsp;...</li></ul> Transforming a garbage heap into a public park Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-07-02T17:37:00-04:00 >2015-07-05T09:20:55-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Since the capping and closure of Fresh Kills&rsquo; five mounds, this 2,200-acre expanse of wetlands, marshlands, dry lowlands, forests, and grasslands has evolved into an unusual combination of natural and engineered beauty.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Originally a patch of creeks and marshland on the western shore of Staten Island, the area now known as Fresh Kills became a major landfill for New York City in 1948, once Robert Moses bought the land for housing development. His plan was to solidify the marshland with waste for a few years, and then build. But construction never happened, and for the remainder of the 20th century, the area served as a 2,200-acre garbage heap (by comparison, Central Park covers 843 acres). People hated it, and in 2001 managed to get the city to close it down, and begin the process of transforming it back into its (more or less) former ecological state, to be used as a public park known as Freshkills.</p><p>Learn more about Freshkills' storied past:</p><ul><li><a title="Transforming Freshkills Park from Landfill to Landscape" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Transforming Freshkills Park from Landfill to Landscape</a></li><li><a title="A pretty picture of the future for Fresh Kills" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A pretty picture of the future for Fresh Kills</a></li></ul> New York's "poor doors" are no more Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-06-29T20:01:00-04:00 >2015-07-08T15:04:09-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The separate entrances for the rich and poor came about due to a loophole in the Inclusionary Housing program enacted in 2009 that allowed developers to get subsidies if they provided affordable housing either on or off-site.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Last year, a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">luxury NYC high-rise</a> had its request for separate entrances &ndash; one for its affordable housing-unit tenants, another for its market-rate tenants &ndash; approved, fanning the fires of discriminatory design debates <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here on Archinect</a>. Now, the loophole in a NY-rent stabilization law that made such <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"poor doors"</a> possible has been closed, thanks to a new provision from NYC mayor Bill de Blasio.</p><p>Another instance of "poor door" discriminatory housing in Canada:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Another case of "poor door" for proposed Vancouver high-rise</a></p> Hot Work in the Summertime: From Helsinki to London to NYC, Archinect Sessions #35 Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-06-25T17:20:00-04:00 >2015-06-29T23:35:12-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="333" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Lots of summer blockbuster news to discuss on this week's podcast. The <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">winner of the Helsinki Guggenheim competition was announced</a> (a young husband-wife firm from Paris took the cake), <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">SelgasCano</a>'s&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"psychedelic chrysalis" Serpentine Pavilion opened</a>, and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Andres Jaque's COSMO for MoMA PS1's "Warm Up"</a> began its water cycle. And while not quite blockbusting, in what could easily be the premise for a Vincent Price flick, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">residents of the blighted Robin Hood Gardens dared Lord Rogers</a> to spend a night in their quarters.</p><p>Special guests&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Quilian Riano</a> and Peggy Deamer of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Architecture Lobby</a> join our news discussion this week, dropping their excellent and incisive commentary on ethical practice into every topic. We are collaborating with the Lobby to measure satisfaction with work-life balance in architecture &ndash; take the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">3-question survey here</a>.</p><p>Listen to episode thirty-five of&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>Archinect Sessions</strong></a>, "Hot Work in the Summertime":</p><ul><li><strong>iTunes</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Click here to listen</a>, and click the "Subscribe" button below ...</li></ul> There is nothing so stable as change: Nick Taylor, director of BIG's 2WTC video, and McShane Murnane of Project M Plus on Archinect Sessions #34 Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-06-18T18:22:00-04:00 >2015-07-08T10:13:28-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="333" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Easily the biggest news of last week, and probably of this year, was the unveiling of BIG's design for 2WTC. For a project of such status, on such a highly charged site, representation must be handled with expert care &ndash; so to dig a bit deeper into <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">the splashy video introducing&nbsp;2WTC</a>, we spoke with Nick Taylor, co-founder of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Squint/Opera</a> and director of the BIG video. We cover Squint/Opera's historied relationship with architects and how creative vision is managed across many powerful stakeholders.</p><p>Paul and Amelia also sat down with McShane Murnane, architecture director and co-founder of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Project M Plus</a>, a husband-wife creative studio out of Los Angeles' Silver Lake. Often viewed as a case-study for gentrification in LA, Silver Lake has established a highly specific aesthetic within the Californian sensibility, that has its pros and cons &ndash; we speak with Murnane about how he's dealt with issues of developmental displacement head-on.</p><p>And in the news, we discuss how&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Tadao Ando</a>&nbsp;is faring am...</p> Make Music NY crowdfunds upcoming youth archi-music show "Concerto for Buildings" Justine Testado 2015-06-11T09:04:00-04:00 >2015-06-15T21:30:29-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="341" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The architecturally and musically inclined can join in on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Make Music New York</a> festivities this year with a special orchestral performance called "Concerto for Buildings" on Sunday, June 21. Make Music New York is a one-day music fest on the first day of summer that boasts more than 1,000 free concerts, which all take place throughout NYC's five borroughs.</p><p>For its ninth year, MMNY <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">set up an Indiegogo campaign</a> with a flexible goal of $7,000 to reel in further support for Concerto for Buildings. The musical showcase stars two NYC youth orchestra ensembles, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Face The Music</a> and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mantra Youth Percussion</a>, and four composers: Paula Matthusen (winner of the 2014-2015 Rome Prize), Scott Wollshleger, Daniel Goode, and Face the Music student-composer Elijah Valongo. Surrounded by SoHo's historic cast-iron buildings, the performers will play their hearts out as they take advantage of the structures' percussive qualities, thus transforming them into a complementary musical backdrop.</p><p>Funds from the In...</p> Play "Inside the rent", and become a virtual developer in NYC Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-06-09T13:24:00-04:00 >2015-06-09T13:24:20-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="357" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Different policy debates come into play throughout the game and the player is tasked with making choices that will affect the final rent &ndash; for instance build in high-cost neighborhoods, pay workers prevailing wages, expend public money to subsidize the building, or to give in and accept higher rents than desired.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The rent is too damn high, but so are a lot of other development costs. In this <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">simulation game</a> by NYC's Citizens Housing Planning Council, players go through the steps of planning a NYC rental in the current economic climate &ndash; complete with housing shortage and gentrifying neighborhoods.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>After choosing a site, players must set targets for rent, construction wages, amenities, building size &ndash; and as they outfit their property, they see costs go up, and whether their target rent will actually yield a profit. Or (gasp!) whether they'll need to apply for government subsidies. According to the CHPC, the figures used in the game "are based on interviews with developers, appraisers, architects and underwriters, and are current as of 2015."</p><p>Play&nbsp;<em>Inside the rent&nbsp;</em><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>, and see if you can fix the housing crisis. My $4,000 / mo 2BR in a new Harlem mid-size only exists thanks to government subsidies and minimum construction wages. If you're interested in other real estate development-based games, ...</p> Olafur Eliasson Wants You to Design Utopia (Out of Legos) Nicholas Korody 2015-06-03T13:11:00-04:00 >2015-06-08T11:16:13-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>...The Collectivity Project is about more than just play. Eliasson conceived of the project as a way to bring people together and allow them to create a utopian society, if only in miniature form. The idea, which is up until September 30, is at home at the 10th Avenue and West 30th Street section of the High Line, where the sounds of construction buzz in the background.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The project, which has previously had iterations in Norway and Albania, comprises a station set up on the High Line with piles of white lego pieces. The public is invited to collaborate on creating a miniature city. To kick off the fun, the High Line invited ten of the city's best-known firms &ndash; BIG, David M. Schwarz Architects, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, James Corner Field Operations, OMA New York, Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Selldorf Architects, SHoP, Steven Holl Architects &ndash; to create one "visionary structure or construction."</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Olafur Eliasson is a Danish-Icelandic artist known for large-scale, immersive installations that involve elemental materials, including light, heat, and water. For example, last year he turned&nbsp;the galleries of the Louisiana Museum in Denmark into a '<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">riverbed</a>.' A few years ago, he gained major attention for a series of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">man-made waterfall structures</a> in New York's East River. Eliasson also works in architecture often, such as with...</p> The view from One World Trade Center Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-06-01T12:49:00-04:00 >2015-06-01T12:49:14-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Legends, a company that manages skyboxes and stadiums and now runs the World Trade Center observation deck, has turned the view into a high-tech spectacular. Before you get a glimpse of an actual place, you follow a winding path through cheesy synthetic bedrock; ride an elevator where 500 years of an ever-changing New York unfold as if seen from a rising balloon [...] A view gives the illusion of omniscience.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The observatory, located on floors 100, 101 and 102, opened to the public on May 29th.</p> Construction of Steven Holl-designed Queens Library is underway Justine Testado 2015-05-22T16:20:00-04:00 >2015-05-27T11:01:34-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Construction of the forthcoming Queens Library has begun at Center Boulevard and 48th Avenue in Hunters Point of NYC's Long Island City. Steven Holl Architects won the commission <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">back in 2010</a> to design the new $30.6 million public library. Surrounded by recently built skyscraper condominiums and nearby attractions like the Gantry waterfront and Louis Kahn's Roosevelt Four Freedoms Park, the Queens Library is set up to become the latest landmark for the changing neighborhood.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The library's new design was developed in effort to provide more communal space for local residents and create new connections to surrounding areas in the neighborhood. The library is encased within an exposed concrete square volume coated in aluminum for a "subtle sparkle". Users would move up and along a series of bookshelf-flanked stairs and will encounter the separate children's, teen, and adult areas of the building's fluid program. Glazed cuts in the facade also further open up the building and give views o...</p> Jean Nouvel's super-tall 53W53 MoMA tower is "still an art" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-05-18T13:19:00-04:00 >2015-05-26T19:12:44-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Nouvel&rsquo;s aspirations for 53W53, scheduled for completion in fall 2018, sound almost modest: &ldquo;It&rsquo;s going to try to hold its place, [...] It&rsquo;s going to try to be good enough for New York &hellip; it&rsquo;s going to try to make its own small contribution, and it&rsquo;s done in a way that ensures this contribution is readable, understandable, and it&rsquo;s maybe a bit more precious than others. And it&rsquo;s a little linked to this notion &ndash; a fairly disputed notion these days &ndash; that architecture is still an art, sometimes.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Open data's potential & challenges to boost tenants’ rights activism Alexander Walter 2015-05-11T17:54:00-04:00 >2015-05-13T20:31:05-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="365" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Open data, and the interactive mapping and data visualization that can come of it, has become a de facto engagement and storytelling tool among contemporary journalists, social justice activists, and civic-minded technologists. But despite its allure, open data&rsquo;s potential for fostering civic engagement and creating transparency and dialogue is plagued by issues of usability, access, and quality control.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> The New York Times reviews MoMA exhibit, Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980 Joachim Perez 2015-05-01T11:12:00-04:00 >2015-05-04T14:52:27-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="321" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The exhibition recalls an earlier era when architects there believed that social challenges should be tackled by design, that humane societies deserved beautiful new forms, and progressive development put faith in art, nature and the resilience of ordinary people.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Michael Kimmelman of The New York Times wrote a review on the recent MoMA exhibit,<em>&nbsp;&lsquo;Latin America in Construction: Architecture&nbsp;1955-1980&rsquo;</em>. The exhibit highlights the work of Oscar Niemeyer, Lina Bo Bardi,&nbsp;Eladio Dieste, Rogelio Salmona and others who helped define Latin American modern architecture. &nbsp;On display are photographs, videos, drawings, blueprints and models. &nbsp;Some models shown in Kimmelman's article feature the work of University of Miami students who collaborated with MoMA on this exhibit.</p>