Archinect - News 2016-06-27T23:38:37-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/149050607/more-americans-are-becoming-mega-commuters-u-s-census-stats-show More Americans are becoming "mega-commuters", U.S. Census stats show Justine Testado 2016-02-26T17:51:00-05:00 >2016-02-26T17:54:23-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/gp/gpr1bo0rsczw2co5.jpg" width="514" height="373" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In 1980, for instance, fewer than 12 percent of American workers commuted for 45 minutes or more one way, according to the Census. The Census didn't even bother separating out 60- and 90-minute commuters in 1980, since it was relatively rare. But they began tracking these mega-commuters in 1990. That year, 1.6 percent of workers commuted 90 minutes or more one way. In 2014, 2.62 percent of workers were commuting this long, an increase of 64 percent over the prevalence in 1990.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More about urban mobility:</p><p><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/146756658/so-cal-has-dumped-a-lot-of-money-into-transit-projects-but-there-s-been-little-pay-off-so-far" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">So Cal has dumped a lot of money into transit projects, but there's been little pay-off so far</a></p><p><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/145287841/the-ehang-passenger-drone-might-be-another-way-people-will-get-around-town-someday" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Ehang passenger drone might be another way people will get around town someday</a></p><p><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/139616789/is-america-actually-shifting-away-from-its-car-obsession-not-entirely" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Is America actually shifting away from its car obsession? Not entirely.</a></p><p><a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/141511613/think-driverless-cars-will-reduce-traffic-not-so-fast" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Think driverless cars will reduce traffic? Not so fast.</a></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/143513210/interested-in-how-urban-design-and-mental-health-connect-a-brand-new-journal-wants-your-thoughts Interested in how urban design and mental health connect? A brand new journal wants your thoughts! Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-12-16T12:59:00-05:00 >2015-12-28T00:05:44-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/if/ifkncbaepsna9ogm.jpg" width="514" height="277" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Centre for Urban Design and Mental Health is planning to launch a new, biannual journal in early 2016. This online journal will help address the challenge of there not being many journals explicitly publishing research on the links between urban design and mental health right now. [...] Do you have a relevant research paper, case study, review, comment piece, photograph, book review or other relevant content, (or a good suggestion for the journal's name)? If yes, please submit</p></em><br /><br /><p>Interested in submitting? Here's the details from the Urban Design / Mental Health <a href="http://www.urbandesignmentalhealth.com/blog/call-for-papers-new-journal-for-urban-design-and-mental-health" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">website</a>:</p><ul><li>This journal is not currently peer-reviewed. Editorial decisions will be made by Layla McCay (UD/MH Director) and Itai Palti (UD/MH Fellow and Guest Editor of the edition). The journal will be open-access. The style of writing and terminology should be clear, succinct, interesting, and accessible to multi-disciplinary professionals including scientists, psychologists, architects, planners, interior designers, planners, policymakers, etc.</li><li><strong>Research papers</strong>: up to 4,000 words (and note we value succinct writing). Please include a 200-300 word abstract including introduction, methods, results, conclusion, and a short comment on what your findings mean practically for those working in urban design/mental health. Please include 1-3 relevant photographs (with description and any attributions). Please ensure your paper is fully referenced, with a link associated with each reference.</li><li><strong>Comment pieces/op-eds...</strong></li></ul> http://archinect.com/news/article/140343455/suicide-rates-are-higher-in-rural-areas-than-in-cities-but-why Suicide rates are higher in rural areas than in cities, but why? Nicholas Korody 2015-11-03T13:59:00-05:00 >2015-11-05T22:54:26-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/wx/wxo58zykvhvq4vtt.jpg" width="514" height="341" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Rural adolescents commit suicide at roughly twice the rate of their urban peers, according to a study published in the May issue of the journal JAMA Pediatrics. Although imbalances between city and country have long persisted, &ldquo;we weren&rsquo;t expecting that the disparities would be increasing over time,&rdquo; said the study&rsquo;s lead author, Cynthia Fontanella, a psychologist at Ohio State University. &ldquo;The rates are higher, and the gap is getting wider.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>"Suicide is a threat not just to the young. Rates over all&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6414a9.htm" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">rose 7 percent in metropolitan counties from 2004 to 2013</a>, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In rural counties, the increase was 20 percent."</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/138879113/an-environmental-psychologist-on-why-boring-design-is-bad-for-your-health An environmental psychologist on why boring design is bad for your health Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-10-13T13:44:00-04:00 >2015-10-24T21:11:33-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/n0/n0j2nr0blqoffeip.jpg" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>boring environments can generate stress, impulsivity, lowered levels of positive affect, and risky behaviour. [...] based on well-understood principles of neuroplasticity and on what is known of the effects of deprivation and enrichment in other more extreme settings ... there is every reason to believe that these sterile, homogeneous environments are exerting a measurable effect on our behaviour [...] Given this, the prudent design of city streets and buildings is a matter of public health.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More on the intersection of urban design and mental health:</p><ul><li><a title="How urban designers can better address mental health in their work, according to a new think tank" href="http://archinect.com/news/article/135187854/how-urban-designers-can-better-address-mental-health-in-their-work-according-to-a-new-think-tank" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">How urban designers can better address mental health in their work, according to a new think tank</a></li><li><a title="Mindy Thompson Fullilove is a psychiatrist for cities" href="http://archinect.com/news/article/134889035/mindy-thompson-fullilove-is-a-psychiatrist-for-cities" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mindy Thompson Fullilove is a psychiatrist for cities</a></li><li><a title="Preventing disease and upholding public health through architecture" href="http://archinect.com/news/article/134105904/preventing-disease-and-upholding-public-health-through-architecture" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Preventing disease and upholding public health through architecture</a></li><li><a title="It's official: trees are good for your health" href="http://archinect.com/news/article/131562508/it-s-official-trees-are-good-for-your-health" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">It's official: trees are good for your health</a></li></ul> http://archinect.com/news/article/135187854/how-urban-designers-can-better-address-mental-health-in-their-work-according-to-a-new-think-tank How urban designers can better address mental health in their work, according to a new think tank Justine Testado 2015-08-26T14:01:00-04:00 >2015-08-27T03:57:37-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/ql/qljdtul9254499fr.jpg" width="514" height="340" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>With the huge impact of mental disorders on people&rsquo;s health and wellbeing, and the increased mental health risk of that comes simply from living in a city, you might think that mental health would be an urban health priority. In fact, few policies or recommendations for healthy urban environments address mental health in any depth.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Layla McCay, director of the recently launched <a href="http://www.urbandesignmentalhealth.com" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Centre for Urban Design &amp; Mental Health</a> think tank, gives her two cents on the stigma that still overshadows mental health, both in urban design and current society.</p><p>More on Archinect:</p><p><a title="Mindy Thompson Fullilove is a psychiatrist for cities" href="http://archinect.com/news/article/134889035/mindy-thompson-fullilove-is-a-psychiatrist-for-cities" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mindy Thompson Fullilove is a psychiatrist for cities</a></p><p><a title="Jason Danziger heals psychosis with design" href="http://archinect.com/news/article/134183942/jason-danziger-heals-psychosis-with-design" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Jason Danziger heals psychosis with design</a></p><p><a title="Putting entire cities on the psychiatrist's couch" href="http://archinect.com/news/article/130868125/putting-entire-cities-on-the-psychiatrist-s-couch" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Putting entire cities on the psychiatrist's couch</a></p><p><a title="Study Links Walkable Neighborhoods to Prevention of Cognitive Decline" href="http://archinect.com/news/article/116114669/study-links-walkable-neighborhoods-to-prevention-of-cognitive-decline" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Study Links Walkable Neighborhoods to Prevention of Cognitive Decline</a></p><p><a title="Mental Health Survey at University of Toronto&rsquo;s Faculty of Architecture Reveals Worrisome Results " href="http://archinect.com/news/article/96244091/mental-health-survey-at-university-of-toronto-s-faculty-of-architecture-reveals-worrisome-results" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mental Health Survey at University of Toronto&rsquo;s Faculty of Architecture Reveals Worrisome Results </a></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/134183942/jason-danziger-heals-psychosis-with-design Jason Danziger heals psychosis with design Julia Ingalls 2015-08-13T13:33:00-04:00 >2015-08-15T16:49:09-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/bq/bq6k4wd5x674l0sg.jpg" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Danziger addressed the issues of perception: How does a patient with a shifted perception experience space? He focused on color, the distribution of light, material, and shape.</p></em><br /><br /><p>While designing for medically healthy clients can occasionally drive an architect insane, an entirely different set of challenges is involved in creating a safe and healing environment for <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/96244091/mental-health-survey-at-university-of-toronto-s-faculty-of-architecture-reveals-worrisome-results" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">mentally ill</a> patients. Architect Jason Danziger found himself asking questions like: what makes a bed recognizable to someone in a clinically altered state of mind? Danziger's resulting design for the Soteria at St. Hedwig Hospital in Berlin, executed as part of an ongoing collaboration with medical director Dr. Martin Voss,&nbsp;won him the 2015 BDA Berlin Prize.</p><p>More at the intersection of architecture and mental health:</p><ul><li><a href="http://archinect.com/features/article/104803779/aftershock-3-brains-and-the-city" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">AfterShock #3: Brains and the City</a></li><li><a title="Mental Health Survey at University of Toronto&rsquo;s Faculty of Architecture Reveals Worrisome Results " href="http://archinect.com/news/article/96244091/mental-health-survey-at-university-of-toronto-s-faculty-of-architecture-reveals-worrisome-results" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mental Health Survey at University of Toronto&rsquo;s Faculty of Architecture Reveals Worrisome Results</a></li><li><a title="Putting entire cities on the psychiatrist's couch" href="http://archinect.com/news/article/130868125/putting-entire-cities-on-the-psychiatrist-s-couch" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Putting entire cities on the psychiatrist's couch</a></li><li><a title="UCLA's Patricia Greenfield Tracks Urban Psychology With Words" href="http://archinect.com/news/article/79381636/ucla-s-patricia-greenfield-tracks-urban-psychology-with-words" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">UCLA's Patricia Greenfield Tracks Urban Psychology With Words</a></li></ul><p><em>Update: A previous version of this piece did not mention Dr. Martin Voss' role in the Soteria project.</em></p> http://archinect.com/news/article/96244091/mental-health-survey-at-university-of-toronto-s-faculty-of-architecture-reveals-worrisome-results Mental Health Survey at University of Toronto’s Faculty of Architecture Reveals Worrisome Results joelleond 2014-03-23T13:42:00-04:00 >2014-03-26T13:16:31-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/v9/v9uwj0uiip9y091n.jpg" width="514" height="329" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Earlier this month, the Graduate Architecture, Landscape, and Design Student Union (GALDSU), released the results of its first mental health survey conducted in the month of December 2013. The survey asked students to reflect on their experience at the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design at the University of Toronto, with questions ranging from sleeping habits to issues of physical and mental comfort. The survey forms part of GALDSU&rsquo;s Mental Health Initiative and was developed in collaboration with a doctoral candidate of the Department of Psychology of the University of Toronto.</p><p>Architecture schools have a long standing reputation as pressure cookers, where constant deadlines and a drive for innovation have created an environment where all-nighters are glorified and isolation from the outside world is prevalent. The report, now <a href="http://issuu.com/joelleon1/docs/galdsu_mentalhealth_report2014" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">available online</a>, reaffirms that many aspects of this reputation are well deserved. A majority of students reported irregular slee...</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/47316399/a-study-on-job-seekers-mental-health A Study on Job Seekers' Mental Health Archinect 2012-05-04T20:00:00-04:00 >2012-05-04T20:52:17-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/nw/nwoqy9b64fvfotu2.jpg" width="514" height="367" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>According to a new study led by Connie Wanberg, a University of Minnesota professor of organizational and work behavior, the average laid-off worker experiences a gradual improvement in mental health until the 10- to 12-week mark, when the trend reverses. The study found that those participants who reported better mental health tended to conduct more intense job searches, increasing their likelihood of landing jobs.</p></em><br /><br /><p> Here, <a href="http://archinect.com/jobs" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">take a happy pill</a>.</p>