Archinect - News 2015-11-30T19:31:13-05:00 New movement urges to call Brutalism 'Heroic' instead Alexander Walter 2015-11-25T12:17:00-05:00 >2015-11-26T05:01:15-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="398" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>There&rsquo;s the legacy of Brutalism being such a negative term. It begins the conversation with negativity about these buildings, and this falls into the misreading of them as harsh, Stalinist, or some other kind of monstrous, mean architecture. The name plays into that mischaracterization that&rsquo;s grown around a lot of them. I think &ldquo;Heroic&rsquo;&rdquo; is a better title for what their actual aspirations were. The architects had a real sense of optimism. They were developing architecture for the civic realm.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related news on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Brutalism: the great architectural polarizer</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Art college professor suggests makeover for brutalist Boston City Hall</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Future of Paul Rudolph's brutalist Orange County building still uncertain</a></li></ul> Marcel Breuer Digital Archive Archinect 2012-06-13T19:24:00-04:00 >2012-06-18T17:17:06-04:00 <img src="" width="380" height="475" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Marcel Breuer Digital Archive represents a collaborative effort headed by Syracuse University Library to digitize over 30,000 drawings, photographs, letters and other materials related to the career of Marcel Breuer, one of the most influential architects and furniture designers of the twentieth century.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Anne Griswold Tyng, Pioneering Architect Archinect 2012-05-02T16:07:00-04:00 >2012-05-15T00:15:58-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="767" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>When Anne Griswold Tyng entered Radcliffe College in 1938, she had already found her calling: her faith was in architecture. &ldquo;I was intensely drawn to the combination of science and art, of the pragmatic and aesthetic, of rigorous facts and intuitive leaps,&rdquo; she wrote, looking back nearly 60 years later... In 1942, she enrolled in the first class to admit women at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, where she studied with Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer...</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html>