Archinect - News 2014-04-17T18:00:26-04:00 http://archinect.com/news/article/91945746/yes-sediment-fascinating Yes. Sediment. Fascinating Nam Henderson 2014-01-24T13:45:00-05:00 >2014-01-28T15:10:47-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/jg/jg1vxbpxrcnhgvq3.jpg" width="514" height="794" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Why Louisiana? Well, there are few (if any) other places in North America in which sedimentary geology is more profoundly felt as part of daily life. As I&rsquo;ve recounted elsewhere on this blog (here and here), southern Louisiana was built up entirely from about 8,000 years of sediments deposited by the Mississippi River.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Following the conclusion of <a href="http://dredgeresearchcollaborative.org/dredgefest/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">DredgeFest Louisiana</a>&nbsp;Adam Mandelman reviews the time he spent&nbsp;in the company of what he affectionately calls "sediment nerds".</p><p>Meanwhile, over at the NOLA Defender, Christopher Staudinger penned a dispatch reviewing the tour portion of&nbsp;Dredgefest, for the <a href="http://www.noladefender.com/content/afternoon-diversions" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Afternoon Diversions</a> column.</p> http://archinect.com/news/article/45551067/bracket-goes-soft-dredge-locked bracket [goes soft]: Dredge Locked Archinect 2012-04-19T13:10:00-04:00 >2012-04-19T13:16:49-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/y4/y41e5s5kjb722jpm.jpg" width="514" height="315" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> In anticipation of today's event, <a href="http://archinect.com/news/article/45228588/join-archinect-in-hollywood-this-thursday-for-publish-or-bracket-goes-soft" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Publish Or... bracket [GOES SOFT]</a>, we are showcasing a piece from the book each day this week. We hope to see you tonight!</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> <a href="http://brkt.org/index.php/soft/selections/dredge_locked" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>Dredge Locked</strong></a><br> by Alex Yuen</p> <p> <em>Unnoticed by many, Houston&rsquo;s shipping channel, like many such commercial waterways around the globe, is subjected to a continual process of dredging, in order to maintain a certain breadth and depth to accommodate the vessels that enter and leave Houston every day.&nbsp; This material, however, is seldom regarded as anything but waste and is deposited and contained, either within the channel or on shore, taking up space and spreading the harmful bi-products of the petrochemical facilities in the area.&nbsp; Up to this point, such actions have rarely been scrutinized and this system of isolating and hiding the contaminated material, even at such a massive scale, continues.&nbsp; Yet as the world and Houston move into a new era of awareness and accountability, major possibilities are lost by simply sweeping ...</em></p>