Archinect - News 2015-10-08T23:20:03-04:00 Bjarke Ingels and the challenges of designing Two World Trade Center Alexander Walter 2015-10-06T13:41:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T22:59:08-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="350" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>He has coined a punning term, BIGamy, to describe his own up-for-anything style. He rejects the idea that an architect must adhere to a single personal aesthetic, which enables him to be cheerfully flexible in meeting the demands of corporate clients. Ingels&rsquo; creative impulse to say yes to everything, even contradictions, often leads him into hybridism.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously in the Archinect News:</p><ul><li><a href="" target="_blank">2 World Trade Center Could Be the Most Expensive Office Tower in the World</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">Archinect's critical round-up of BIG's Two World Trade Center Design</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">Renderings of BIG-Designed Two World Trade Center Revealed</a></li></ul> Can Vancouver break out of its 'boring-architecture' mold with these new ambitious skyscrapers? Alexander Walter 2015-09-21T17:03:00-04:00 >2015-09-21T17:12:20-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A slew of innovative new condo towers are being proposed for Vancouver, as the city aims to take its arguably boring architecture to the next level. [...] Vancouver's move into adventurous architecture arguably began back in 2013, when Danish architect Bjarke Ingels revealed his design for twisting tower Vancouver House, which is now under construction.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BIG&rsquo;s 490-foot-tall Beach and Howe Tower for Vancouver</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Another case of "poor door" for proposed Vancouver high-rise</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Interview with Vancouver Art Gallery's director: how will Herzog &amp; de Meuron's new museum impact Canadian architecture?</a></li></ul> Get a glimpse of these hacked IKEA kitchens by BIG, Henning Larsen, and NORM Architects Justine Testado 2015-08-11T14:15:00-04:00 >2015-08-19T07:47:50-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="328" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Here comes another product collaboration between famous architects and affordable-brand giants. Pretty soon, consumers worldwide can add a hint of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BIG</a>, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Henning Larsen Architects</a>, or <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">NORM Architects</a> into their everyday kitchen space. Danish furniture brand <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Reform</a>, whose <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">concept</a> focuses on hacking IKEA kitchen-cabinet fronts with their own customized designs, collaborated with the big-name architects in envisioning the new collection of kitchen cabinets. The kitchens will make their public debut at the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">northmodern</a> trade show on August 13-15 and will be on sale starting September 1 (promotional video below).</p><p>The cabinets already have the on-trend sleekness and minimalism down, but stamping on the names of famous architecture firms ups the chic factor effortlessly. The cabinets by the one and only Bjarke Ingels Group&nbsp;&mdash; who is <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">no stranger to designing home products</a>&nbsp;&mdash; are available in white and oak or stainless steel, with a composite table top and composite wash. The cabinets come with ha...</p> There is nothing so stable as change: Nick Taylor, director of BIG's 2WTC video, and McShane Murnane of Project M Plus on Archinect Sessions #34 Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-06-18T18:22:00-04:00 >2015-07-08T10:13:28-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="333" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Easily the biggest news of last week, and probably of this year, was the unveiling of BIG's design for 2WTC. For a project of such status, on such a highly charged site, representation must be handled with expert care &ndash; so to dig a bit deeper into <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">the splashy video introducing&nbsp;2WTC</a>, we spoke with Nick Taylor, co-founder of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Squint/Opera</a> and director of the BIG video. We cover Squint/Opera's historied relationship with architects and how creative vision is managed across many powerful stakeholders.</p><p>Paul and Amelia also sat down with McShane Murnane, architecture director and co-founder of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Project M Plus</a>, a husband-wife creative studio out of Los Angeles' Silver Lake. Often viewed as a case-study for gentrification in LA, Silver Lake has established a highly specific aesthetic within the Californian sensibility, that has its pros and cons &ndash; we speak with Murnane about how he's dealt with issues of developmental displacement head-on.</p><p>And in the news, we discuss how&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Tadao Ando</a>&nbsp;is faring am...</p> Is Thomas Heatherwick designing Google's London HQ? Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-06-15T14:03:00-04:00 >2015-06-16T19:31:49-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="286" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Google's ambitious &pound;1 billion King's Cross development, which will be the technology giant's European headquarters, has faced repeated delays since it was first announced back in 2013. The project currently has "no target completion date."</p></em><br /><br /><p>This news came to <em>Business Insider</em>&nbsp;via&nbsp;"a source close to Heatherwick", although neither Google nor Heatherwick has commented on it at this time. <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Heatherwick</a> is already pinned to the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">expansion of Google's Mountain View headquarters</a>, along with Bjarke Ingels of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BIG</a>. Previous designs by local firm <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">AHMM</a> were rejected by Google earlier this year, but it's unclear whether they'll still play a role in the design process.</p> Stargazing with Patrik Schumacher: Episode 33 of Archinect Sessions Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-06-11T17:40:00-04:00 >2015-07-04T18:37:35-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="333" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>This week, we devote the majority of our show to a discussion with <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Patrik Schumacher</a>, about celebrity and the insularity of critical discourse in architecture. The idea of the "starchitect" is onerous to pretty much everybody in architecture, but that hasn't stopped us from using it. It's a popular media fabrication that, by becoming a potent cultural meme in its own right (thanks, Gehry), has derailed significant portions of architecture discourse into the murky realm of identity politics &ndash; the aesthetics and politics of a built object becoming an inextricable part of their designer's character. Schumacher's Parametricism may be an antidote to that. We discuss <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Schumacher's recent op-ed</a> on these subjects, in the hope that keeping the discussion going will flush out something useful (or even flush away the "starchitect" concept entirely).</p><p>In the news, we touch on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BIG's design for Two World Trade Center displacing Foster's</a>, the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">resignation of five Cooper Union trustees</a> (including Danie...</p> Archinect's critical round-up of BIG's Two World Trade Center Design Julia Ingalls 2015-06-10T16:40:00-04:00 >2015-06-15T17:59:33-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="370" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Taken out of its high-profile context, the BIG design for Two World Trade Center initially appears to be a graduate school placeholder: here are the initial seven blocks of program, with a light dusting of foliage on the exposed step-backs. The internet's critical reaction to the renderings released to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">WIRED</a> has been heated: it's the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New Museum</a> without the ingenuity, it's a brilliant melding of memorial gravitas and client-driven-design, it's nothing but spoon-fed media hype taken to a 1,300 foot extreme. Of course, this is a building that can't be taken out of its context, not only in terms of being a new icon of Manhattan, but also because it is something of a sequel: its unabashed boxiness and new media savvy presentation clashes with <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Foster + Partners'</a> previous svelte, slanted diamond-topped design. A little more than 24 hours after the renderings were released, we've rounded up the most compelling critical and forum-based reaction:</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>In <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Vanity Fair</a>, <strong>Paul Goldberger</strong> confronts the c...</p> Renderings of BIG-Designed Two World Trade Center Revealed Julia Ingalls 2015-06-09T13:14:00-04:00 >2015-06-16T00:02:07-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="428" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;The architecture becomes a solution to an almost unsolvable puzzle,&rdquo; Ingels told me one recent morning.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Last week <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Archinect</a>&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">broke the news</a> that Bjarke Ingels' <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BIG</a> had taken over the design of Two World Trade Center from <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Foster + Partners</a>, and today BIG has released its first renderings of its proposed new design. Foster's slanted quadruple diamond crown has been nixed in favor of a stepped-back design of seven stacked boxes that preserves the existing views to St. Paul's Chapel to Memorial Park while making it appear from the New Jersey waterfront that Two World Trade Center is "leaning in" to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">SOM</a>'s One World Trade Center. BIG's significant redesign also incorporates a series of&nbsp;rooftop gardens on each step-backed ledge, which will feature biomes from the arctic to the tropics.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The design attempts to honor the memorial of Ground Zero while simultaneously injecting BIG's signature enthusiasm into what will be the third tallest tower in New York City. As Ingels explained to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">WIRED Magazine</a>, &ldquo;On one hand [the design is] about being respectful and about completing the frame around the memor...</p> Foster's Out, Ingels' In: BIG-Designed Two World Trade Center to House News Corp. and 21st Century Fox Julia Ingalls 2015-06-03T13:52:00-04:00 >2015-06-10T21:59:16-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="372" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;This isn&rsquo;t your grandfather&rsquo;s Wall Street.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>According to a statement issued on Tuesday, the design of Two World Trade Center, which was <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">formerly the province of Foster + Partners</a>, is now being handled by Bjarke Ingels' firm <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BIG</a> and will likely house employees of both 21st Century Fox and News Corp. The media organizations inked a non-binding agreement with developer Larry Silverstein that places them in the tower, which as of now is slated to be the second-tallest tower in the four-tower World Trade Center complex. The proposed move is significant not only because many of the towers still boast significant&nbsp;amounts of unleased space (the two companies would occupy 1.3 million square feet of the tower's 2.8 million total available), but because both 21st Century Fox and News Corp. represent a new type of tenant for the traditionally financially dominated area. <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">According to Bloomberg</a>, Christopher Jones, vice president of research at New York's Regional Plan Association said,&nbsp;&ldquo;People were expecting financial companies to be a sub...</p> Google loses to LinkedIn in Silicon Valley HQ pitch Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-05-06T15:29:00-04:00 >2015-05-08T16:36:32-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="385" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In a blow to Google&rsquo;s expansion plans, on Tuesday the Mountain View City Council voted to give the search giant roughly a quarter of the office space it had requested for the project, and instead awarded the lion&rsquo;s share of the city&rsquo;s future office development &ndash;- 1.5 million square feet &ndash;- to LinkedIn. Google received about 500,000 square feet, or about enough to build one of the four buildings it had proposed.</p></em><br /><br /><p>How this news will affect BIG and Heatherwick's design for the Googleplex expansion is as of yet undetermined. Earlier today, we learned that Google planned on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">constructing its new HQ using "crabots"</a>, so clearly sights were set on the Mountain View City Council giving the go-ahead. David Radcliffe, Google's VP of real estate, said in an emailed statement:&nbsp;&ldquo;We know the City Council had a tough decision to make last night and thank them and our community for more than six hours of debate,&rdquo; and that Google would &ldquo;continue to work with the City on Google&rsquo;s future in Mountain View.&rdquo;</p><p>Details on BIG and Heatherwick's proposal <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> Critical response to Googleplex expansion focuses on suburban development, not architecture Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-03-10T15:37:00-04:00 >2015-03-15T18:38:24-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="388" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Google&rsquo;s <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">choice of BIG and Heatherwick Studios</a> to design their Mountain View campus expansion is true to form: big, brash, debatably realistic, with a dash of techno-utopianism. The critical response to the proposal &ndash; a series of webbed glass shells covering reconfigurable utility spaces, integrated with the North Shore&rsquo;s natural landscape and urban life &ndash; depended on where it was published. Design and architecture publications picked at BIG and Heatherwick&rsquo;s design; tech and general publications focused on mega-client Google and the changes to Mountain View.</p><p>The renderings released at the end of February (see <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>) are part of a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">massive master plan</a> submitted by Google to Mountain View officials on February 27. It is highly unlikely it will proceed as-is. But with the sheer real estate that Google commands in Mountain View, this project adding 2.5 million new square feet to Google&rsquo;s cache of the majority of privately owned land in the North Bayshore area, it&rsquo;s certainly not scaling t...</p> Bjarke Ingels and Oliver Wainwright talk New York Dryline Alexander Walter 2015-03-09T14:08:00-04:00 >2015-03-15T16:01:52-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="395" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>There aren&rsquo;t many architects you would believe could hold back seas and save the world from being drowned by Biblical floods. But when you meet Bjarke Ingels, anything seems eminently possible. [...] If New York has to build 10 miles of flood defences to protect the city from another Hurricane Sandy, why not conceive the barrier as a brand new waterfront park? Climate security as leisure amenity. You can almost hear the standing ovation and all-American whooping in the background.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A closer look into &ldquo;The BIG U&rdquo;, BIG&rsquo;s winning proposal for Rebuild By Design</a></p> Archinect Sessions Episode #19: Don't be Evil, Don't Throw Stones Archinect 2015-03-05T14:11:00-05:00 >2015-03-25T10:22:31-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="333" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>This week Amelia, Paul, Donna and Ken discuss the somewhat controversial <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Google Headquarters</a> design by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BIG</a> and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Heatherwick</a>. On a completely different note, we also discuss the new, and the nation's first, slavery museum,&nbsp;Whitney Plantation, in Louisiana.&nbsp;</p><p>As always, you can send us&nbsp;your architectural legal issues, comments or questions via <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">twitter</a> #archinectsessions,&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">email</a>&nbsp;or call us at (213) 784-7421. And if you can, we'd love for you to rate us on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">iTunes</a> or Stitcher!</p><p>Listen to episode nineteen of&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>Archinect Sessions</strong></a>, "Don't be Evil, Don't Throw Stones":</p><ul><li><strong>iTunes</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Click here to listen</a>, and click the "Subscribe" button below the logo to automatically download new episodes.</li><li><strong>Apple Podcast App (iOS)</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="pcast://" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">click here to subscribe</a></li><li><strong>Stitcher</strong>:&nbsp;<a href=";refid=stpr" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">click here to listen</a></li><li><strong>SoundCloud</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">click here to follow Archinect</a></li><li><strong>RSS</strong>: subscribe with any of your favorite podcasting apps via our RSS feed:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"></a></li><li><strong>Download</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">this episode</a></li></ul><p></p> Google Unveils BIG + Heatherwick Studios Collaboration for New Campus Master Plan Nicholas Korody 2015-02-27T16:26:00-05:00 >2015-03-06T18:41:08-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="385" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>&ldquo;Silicon Valley has been the cradle of a series of innovations that, over the last decades, have propelled technology and [the] world economy, but all of the resources, all of the intelligence, has been invested into the immaterial, the digital realm, the internet,&rdquo; asserts Bjarke Ingels of <a href=";rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=1&amp;ved=0CB8QFjAA&amp;;ei=-MfwVI6uEsimgwSVx4DgAQ&amp;usg=AFQjCNF60fL4F7VbSYOVwLzjbYXvwUsN6w&amp;sig2=r5l7ynji_q4IHnSbtCP2Uw&amp;bvm=bv.87269000,d.eXY" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BIG</a> at the beginning of a new video released today by Google (posted at the end of this article). David Radcliffe, the&nbsp;Vice President of Real Estate and Workplace Services at Google, continues: "Tech really hasn&rsquo;t adopted a particular language for buildings.&rdquo; Google hopes to change that, unveiling an ambitious new master plan for their Mountain View campus designed collaboratively by Bjarke Ingels Group and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Heatherwick Studio</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Radcliffe explains that Google scoured the world for the architecture practices they found most innovative. "The BIG Studios &ndash; they&rsquo;re ambitious, they do a lot of very community-focused projects and that was very compelling to us,&rdquo; while Thomas Heatherwick "has this attentio...</p> BIG's Telus Sky Tower breaks ground in Calgary, Canada. Justine Testado 2015-02-19T09:12:00-05:00 >2015-02-19T14:46:54-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="514" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>BIG and Dialog's TELUS Sky Tower recently broke ground along 7th Avenue block in the heart of Calgary, Canada, a city full of corporate towers surrounded by low-density suburban neighborhoods. Unveiled i<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">n 2013</a>, the 761,235 sq.ft commercial tower integrates both working and living environments into one structure that aims to make Calgary's city center more varied and walkable. The tower's textured glass fa&ccedil;ade complements yet stands out from its environment.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>According to the TELUS Sky website, the 59-story tower will begin with dining and retail spaces as well as access to adjacent buildings. The tower also has 26 floors of office spaces ranging from 7,636 sqft-18,997 sq.ft, followed by 29 floors of residential spaces consisting of 326 executive rental suites.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>"The large floor plates for workplaces recede to achieve the slender dimensions&nbsp;of residential floor depths. The texture of the fa&ccedil;ade in a similar fashion evolves&nbsp;from a smooth glass fa&ccedil;ade enclosing the work space to a three-di...</p> Playing with climate at BIG's "Hot to Cold", now open at the National Building Museum Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-01-26T14:12:00-05:00 >2015-02-02T20:58:47-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>From inside the National Building Museum&rsquo;s cavernous atrium, gaze upwards and you&rsquo;ll see a series of white icons, suspended from the ceiling. Printed on square boards, the symbols loop around the museum&rsquo;s 800-foot arcade, their background shifting from red to green to blue. This iconic distillation is the core organization strategy for <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bjarke Ingels Group</a>&rsquo;s &ldquo;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hot to Cold</a>&rdquo; exhibition, which opened in DC last Friday, categorizing the wunderkind and novel-minded firm&rsquo;s global projects into climatological groups of hot, temperate, and cold.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Despite the name, the exhibition isn&rsquo;t about the architectural imperatives of climate change. Rather, &ldquo;Hot to Cold&rdquo; is a showcase of BIG&rsquo;s diversity of work (built and not) around the world, in program and local biome. Opening to the public in the U.S. capital, the exhibition comes at a strategic time in BIG&rsquo;s project trajectory, having been <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">recently assigned to the massive Smithsonian renovation project</a>, and hot on the heels of their <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BIG Maze</a> at the s...</p> VIDEO: Bjarke Ingels gives a peek of upcoming Europa City amusement hub Justine Testado 2015-01-13T20:33:00-05:00 >2015-01-15T06:44:11-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="291" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Is Bjarke Ingels building an amusement park? The architect created a promotional film with <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Squint/Opera</a> that presents his proposed design for Europa City, a leisure and recreational destination that will be built north of Paris by the year 2020. Construction is currently scheduled to start in 2017.</p><p>In the first film, Bjarke Ingels introduces the project, whose plan consists of radial streets connected by a central loop pathway and adjacent quarters with designated spaces for a water park, an international exhibition hall, sports, music venues, retail, restaurants, and hotels. In a way, Europa City resembles the snail-like layout of the Parisian arrondissements. The second film tours each of Europa City's quarters through the use of photorealistic 3D and 2D graphics and stills.</p><p>See the videos for yourself below.</p> Bjarke Ingels offers his architectural advice to young architects Alexander Walter 2015-01-08T13:54:00-05:00 >2015-01-14T21:26:17-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="288" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>We live in the anthropogenic age, where humans don&rsquo;t adapt to life, but life adapts to human needs, Ingels explains, which makes his advice to young architects designing tomorrow&rsquo;s world simple and clear. The key for young architects is to acquire the tools and language to comprehend the human needs outside of the architectural bubble, and understand that they are here to accommodate - and not to be accommodated.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> BIG's “HOT TO COLD” exhibition opens at the National Building Museum next month Justine Testado 2014-12-10T14:29:00-05:00 >2014-12-11T18:10:10-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="340" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>BIG is returning to the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. with a new exhibition titled "HOT TO COLD: an odyssey of architectural adaptation", just a few months after their successful giant indoor maze this past summer that brought in more than 50,000 visitors -- and a marriage proposal. Opening on January 24, the exhibition will showcase BIG's latest projects and more than 60 3-D models will be suspended at the second-floor balconies of the Museum's Great Hall.</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>&uarr; BIG is coming back to the National Building Museum just a few months after their popular Maze installation <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">this past summer</a>.</p><p><strong>Learn more about the exhibition on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a>.</strong></p> First images of BIG’s Malaysia Square in London’s Battersea Power Station Justine Testado 2014-12-03T19:16:00-05:00 >2014-12-04T12:46:44-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="257" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The first images of Bjarke Ingels Group's public square [officially titled Malaysia Square] for the &pound;8 billion Battersea Power Station redevelopment in London have been revealed just a few weeks after BIG was appointed as the competition-winning designer. The public square, which will be BIG's first U.K. project, is only a part of the Battersea Power Station's redevelopment plan.</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Head over to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a> for more details.</p> Smithsonian hires BIG architecture group for $2 billion South Mall renovation plan Archinect 2014-11-13T21:10:00-05:00 >2014-11-19T20:02:56-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="288" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Smithsonian officials are planning a $2 billion futuristic reimagining of the institute&rsquo;s southern campus that will create clear entrances, expand visitor services and upgrade mechanical systems to the historic Castle and the six buildings surrounding it. Architect Bjarke Ingels, partner at BIG in Manhattan, unveiled the proposal Thursday in the Smithsonian Institution Building, known as the Castle.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> BIG appointed to design public square for revamped Battersea Power Station Justine Testado 2014-11-13T18:20:00-05:00 >2014-11-14T10:16:56-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="283" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>BIG is about to make its debut in the UK. The Architects' Journal reported that the Danish firm was selected in an international competition to design the public square in the &pound;8 billion redevelopment of the historic Battersea Power Station, a decommissioned coal-fired power station in southwest London. A formal announcement is yet to be made.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Situated within the Rafael Vi&ntilde;oly-designed masterplan, BIG's public square is described as becoming the gateway to the revamped power station.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>BIG, who is working alongside the Malaysian-backed Battersea Power Station Development in overseeing the design of the public square, is set to join the redevelopment project's star-studded list of architects.</p><p>Find out more on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a>.</p><p>Related: <a title="Gehry and Foster selected to design Phase 3 at Battersea Power Station" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gehry and Foster selected to design Phase 3 at Battersea Power Station</a></p> Bjarke Ingels Will Make You Believe in the Power of Architecture Alexander Walter 2014-11-04T13:20:00-05:00 >2014-11-05T18:03:14-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="301" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A few years ago, the city of Copenhagen invited architects to submit their ideas for the design of an important new facility&mdash;a power plant that will use trash to generate electricity. [...] BIG, pitched a concept in which the plant took the form of a giant artificial ski slope. To Ingels&rsquo; surprise, it was selected as the winning submission. Now, it&rsquo;s under construction, slated for completion in 2017. The power plant was just one of the several projects Ingels shared at WIRED by Design [...].</p></em><br /><br /><p>Click <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a> to watch the full video of Ingels' presentation.</p> Park City Rejects Bjarke Ingels' Kimball Art Center Designs - Again! Alexander Walter 2014-08-26T13:10:00-04:00 >2014-09-03T22:57:55-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="309" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>City Hall on Thursday rejected the designs of the Kimball Art Center's expansion proposal, determining they do not meet the municipal government's strict Old Town guidelines. It was a significant setback as the not-for-profit organization attempts to press ahead with an ambitious redo of the high-profile intersection of Main Street and Heber Avenue. [...] The Kimball Art Center selected a renowned Danish architectural firm, Bjarke Ingels Group, to draft the designs.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously: <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BIG is named winner of the Kimball Art Center Transformation Project Design Competition</a></p> Lego House in Billund, Denmark, begins construction by laying giant Lego brick–shaped foundation stones Alexander Walter 2014-08-21T14:11:00-04:00 >2014-08-22T09:58:35-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="257" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>This week the first six oversize Lego bricks were laid for the foundation of the Lego House in Billund, Denmark, the Lego Group&rsquo;s hometown. Designed by BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group, the architecture of the Lego House is based on&mdash;what else but?&mdash;the iconic shape of the Lego brick.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously: <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Design for LEGO House, designed by BIG, unveiled today</a></p> Weekly News Round-Up for August 4, 2014: Musk, Martha and monuments Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-08-11T15:53:00-04:00 >2014-08-11T15:57:10-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="290" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><strong>Friday, August 8</strong>:</p><ul><li><a title="Guggenheim Bullies Journalist" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Guggenheim Bullies Journalist</a>: Molly Crabapple reports for <em>Vice</em> on inhumane immigrant labor conditions on Saadiyat island in the UAE,&nbsp;where a new arm of the Guggenheim (and Louvre, and NYU) is being built. The Guggenheim holds its cards close and skirts responsibility when Crabapple pushes for answers.</li><li><a title='Controversial new app will keep you away from "sketchy" areas' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Controversial new app will keep you away from "sketchy" areas</a>: "SketchFactor" rates an area's "sketchiness" based on crowd-sourced local data. Critics are worried that the app will amplify racial profiling and encourage stereotyping.</li></ul><p><strong>Thursday, August 7:</strong></p><ul><li><a title="Gentrification and the Persistence of Poor Minority Neighborhoods" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gentrification and the Persistence of Poor Minority Neighborhoods</a>: Harvard sociologists identify another determinant in the gentrification debate: racial composition. Their report, focusing on Chicago, found that a neighborhood's economic redevelopment depended on certain thresholds of black and white residents.</li><li><a title="Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu called for the suspension of the Israeli Architects&rsquo; Association from an international architectural body " href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu called for the suspension of the Israeli Architects&rsquo; Association from an intern...</a></li></ul> More details on BIG's cage-free “Zootopia” redesign Justine Testado 2014-08-06T02:01:00-04:00 >2014-08-06T12:46:37-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="281" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In a commission for the iconic Givskud Zoo in Denmark, BIG's current proposal "Zootopia" includes an open, cage-free zoo landscape for the animals to roam in that is divided into three zones titled "Asia", "Africa", and "America". Human visitors can then observe and ogle at the animals in integrated structures or at elevated viewpoints, and ideally out of the animals' plain sight.</p><p>Despite BIG's optimistic approach in the redesign, a manmade zoo can't fully replace the animals' true natural habitats&nbsp;&mdash; no matter how spacious or meticulously replicated.</p><p>Check out the current proposal below:</p><p>Project statement:&nbsp; "Architects&rsquo; greatest and most important task is to design man-made ecosystems - to ensure that our cities and buildings suit the way we want to live. We must make sure that our cities offer a generous framework for different people - from different backgrounds, economy, gender, culture, education and age &ndash; so they can live together in harmony while taking into account individual ne...</p> Denmark's cage-free zoo will put humans in captivity Alexander Walter 2014-08-05T13:08:00-04:00 >2014-08-12T21:42:01-04:00 <img src="" width="460" height="276" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Bjarke Ingels&rsquo;s &lsquo;zootopia&rsquo; reverses the role of captor and captive to let animals roam free, while humans are hidden from view. But will it become a feral version of the Hunger Games?</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Delve into The BIG Maze at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Justine Testado 2014-07-10T20:26:00-04:00 >2014-08-05T15:15:52-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A life-size maze like the one BIG installed in partnership with the National Building Museum will attract plenty of attention, regardless if people know who BIG is or not. Constructed in the museum's iconic Great Hall, the maze was set up as an interactive sneakpeek for BIG's exhibition scheduled to open at the museum in January 2015.</p></em><br /><br /><p>As a follow-up to our <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">previous mention</a> of the maze, here's a little more detail behind it:</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Check out a time-lapse video of the maze's construction below.</p> Get lost in BIG's human-scale maze Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-07-03T13:23:00-04:00 >2014-07-08T23:25:01-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="352" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The museum teamed up with international architecture firm BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group to construct a maze right in the Great Hall. [...] The museum&rsquo;s &ldquo;ubergoal is that people walk out of here looking at their built world differently,&rdquo; Frankel says. &ldquo;We think this is sort of on the microlevel of that &mdash; forcing people to look up [as they navigate the maze] will make them look at our building differently.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html>