Archinect - News 2016-10-21T21:53:55-04:00 The Artists and Their Alley Nam Henderson 2016-10-21T17:48:00-04:00 >2016-10-21T17:48:59-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="433" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>This narrow, nondescript passage &mdash; known as the Impasse Ronsin &mdash; was once an artery of aesthetic energy that, in no small fashion, defined French postwar art in all its insanity. First the site of the sculptor Constantin Brancusi&rsquo;s studio, Ronsin was later where the likes of Max Ernst, Yves Klein, Niki de Saint Phalle and Jean Tinguely all lived or worked for much of the 1950s and early 1960s.</p></em><br /><br /><p>James McAuley previews '<em>L&rsquo;Impasse Ronsin</em>' an exhibit at&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Paul Kasmin Gallery</a>,&nbsp;from Oct. 27, 2016, to Jan. 18, 2017.</p> After rocky start, Frick Collection selects Selldorf Architects to take on renovation Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-21T12:31:00-04:00 >2016-10-21T12:31:06-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="487" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;She&rsquo;s somebody who has a clear vision of respect for historical buildings but at the same time has a clean, elegant, modernist aesthetic that is very much about welcoming visitors today,&rdquo; said Ian Wardropper, the Frick&rsquo;s director. In coming up with a new design, Ms. Selldorf has been charged with improving circulation in the Frick&rsquo;s galleries, library and public spaces, while maintaining the museum&rsquo;s existing footprint and preserving its jewel-box character.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Prior plans for the museum's addition (designed by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Davis Brody Bond</a>) were dropped by the Frick in June of last year, partially due to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">a letter of protest</a> written on behalf of 51 artists and architects. This past March, the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Frick put forward an RFQ</a> for a new revision plan, and now that Selldorf has been selected, designs will be unveiled in 2017.</p><p>"It&rsquo;s about enhancing the visitor&rsquo;s experience and making it utterly seamless, so that it doesn&rsquo;t harm any of the existing experience that people cherish, myself included,&rdquo; Ms. Selldorf told the&nbsp;<em>Times</em>, speaking to the delicacies of renovating the late Gilded Age mansion's galleries, library and public spaces.</p> Tom Wiscombe redesigns the L.A. billboard (and is chosen over Zaha Hadid's proposal) Julia Ingalls 2016-10-20T12:39:00-04:00 >2016-10-20T19:54:03-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="479" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Although Los Angeles has had its battles over <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">supergraphics</a>&mdash;those painted on advertisements that often stretch multiple stories on a building's facade&mdash;the billboard as a concept has received substantially less attention, unless the provocative imagery on it causes fender benders. However, Tom Wiscombe's proposal for digital, vertically aligned, two-sided billboards that allow people to walk inside of them injects new life into an otherwise sleepy structure, making them less car-centric and more about public space.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The proposed billboards, which were chosen via a West Hollywood RFP over designs submitted by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Zaha Hadid</a>, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gensler</a>, and the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MAK Center</a>, will be placed in public plazas along West Hollywood's section of Sunset Boulevard.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For more on Tom Wiscombe:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A Liberal Education: Tom Wiscombe on Archinect Sessions One-to-One #14</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Take a peek at Tom Wiscombe's "underground" Old Bank District Museum scheme for L.A.</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Moscow New NCCA Entry by Tom Wiscombe Design</a></li></ul> What is it that makes HGTV so addictive? Nicholas Korody 2016-10-19T13:51:00-04:00 >2016-10-19T13:51:45-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="365" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>They want granite countertops and stainless steel appliances. They want a finished basement and an en suite bathroom. They want (original) hardwood flooring and His-and-Hers vanities. They want it for less than fair market value and in their current neighborhood. [...] According to HGTV, viewers in their target demographic watch the network for an average of two hours and 14 minutes per sitting. But why? What is it about HGTV that makes it so compulsively watchable?</p></em><br /><br /><p><em>HGTV isn&rsquo;t a network that accumulates narrative, but it is a network that accumulates detail.</em></p><p>Related:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Falling through the sharing economy's looking glass&mdash;and into an ocean of unpaid, gendered, domestic labor</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Onion takes on the 'Tiny House' movement</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Kanye West has ambitions to design for Ikea; run for President in 2020</a></li></ul> Javier Senosiain's low-income "bio-architecture" housing proposal Julia Ingalls 2016-10-18T14:26:00-04:00 >2016-10-18T15:24:37-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="330" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Forming a closer, more harmonious bond between humanity and nature is the underlying goal of Javier Senosiain's organic or so-called "bio-architecture." His buildings often take the shape of organic forms--in one case, mythic serpent Quetzalcoatl--while simultaneously harvesting rainwater and providing natural shade and ventilation, among other attributes. The Mexican architect and professor at <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">UNAM</a> has a retrospective exhibition at The Palace of Fine Arts in Mexico City displaying his buildings, including a proposed low-income housing complex which breaks away from the cram'em'in monolithic housing milleu and instead creates a walkable, livable village. Check out this <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">CCTV-America</a> video profiling Senosiain and his work:</p> Can Cleveland combat climate change with compact communities? Julia Ingalls 2016-10-18T12:54:00-04:00 >2016-10-18T12:54:49-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="397" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Although Cleveland often serves more as a punchline than a solution (the Cuyahoga River caught fire in 1969 due to pollution), a climate change conference convened by the United Nations and currently being held in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Quito</a>, Ecuador sees new potential in the city. As <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">StreetsBlog</a> reports, if Cleveland can transform its current suburbia into denser neighborhoods, the metropolis could serve as a model for numerous water and climate-challenged cities in how to adapt to the demands of an increasingly populated globe. As a paper entitled "Where to put the next billion people" states:</p><p>"Cleveland could play a significant role in the fight against climate change by developing a strategy for more compact communities and with a more open and encouraging immigration policy, the report concludes.</p><p>The influx of immigrants should probably be planned better.</p><p>Cleveland&rsquo;s outer suburbs and nearby rural towns hold the key. If the suburbs can figure out strategies to retrofit themselves as dense, walkable com...</p> Editor's Picks #456 Nam Henderson 2016-10-18T12:09:00-04:00 >2016-10-19T12:04:50-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="383" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Nicholas Korody</a>&nbsp;talked with Denise Scott Brown about <em>Learning from Las Vegas</em>. To be published as three edited parts, the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">first</a> details her early biography and architectural influences.&nbsp;In <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">part 2</a> she explains the unique pedagogical methods she pioneered, alongside <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Robert Venturi</a>.&nbsp;</p><p>"<em>I was applying urban planning pedagogy to architecture; teaching students to oscillate from analysis to synthesis in the design process, and to see their creativity as lying in both.</em>"</p><p>Part 3, TBD...</p><p>Plus, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Aaron Willette</a>&nbsp;continued the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Matters of Scale</a> series, highlighting the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">work of C.W. Keller + Associates</a>, an engineering and fabrication company who have worked with firms such as; Utile Architects, NADAA and Michael Maltzan Architecture.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>News</strong><br>R.I.P. <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bing Thom</a></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Prison expert Isabel Hight made the case for <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Why the design of prisons matters</a>.&nbsp;<strong>vileradius</strong> noted (for anyone interested n this subject) the "<em>folks at CLOG did a pretty great book on this awhile back (</em><em><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"></a></em><em>/)</em>"</p><p>Reminiscing ...</p> Archinect presents Next Up: The L.A. River, at the A+D Museum on Saturday, October 29! Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-18T12:06:00-04:00 >2016-10-20T20:45:26-04:00 <img src="" width="1200" height="926" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>For the latest installment of Archinect's live podcasting series, <em><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Next Up</a></em>,&nbsp;we're&nbsp;focusing on the L.A. River, and the&nbsp;wide swath of urbanist concerns within its ongoing master planning efforts.</p><p>It could be the project that makes, or breaks, Los Angeles. With a complex historical legacy and an often-misunderstood ecology, the L.A. River&rsquo;s 51-mile stretch is at once a huge urban opportunity, and to many, an even bigger eyesore. Thirty years ago, nonprofit Friends of the Los Angeles River was founded to protect and advocate for the river, and shortly after, the City of L.A. began looking at ways to take better advantage of the immense resource. Since then, many more communities and stakeholders have joined the conversation, raising concerns of ecology, sustainability, gentrification, public space, affordable housing, social equity&mdash;a wealth of complexities that testifies to what a lightning rod of urbanist discourse the River has become.</p><p>While conversations about the L.A. River&rsquo;s future ha...</p> One-to-One #42 with ACADIA workshop co-chairs Catie Newell and Wes McGee Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-17T17:25:00-04:00 >2016-10-18T13:04:05-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="421" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Aside from their role as workshop co-chairs for the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">ACADIA</a> conference, this week's One-to-One guests are both architects who work and teach at&nbsp;Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan. Their focus on fabrication led them to their roles at ACADIA, with McGee directing Taubman's FABLab and Newell serving as Director of the Master of Science in Material Systems and Digital Technologies.</p><p>ACADIA stands for the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture, and this year's conference, "Posthuman Frontiers: Data, Designers and Cognitive Machines" (October 27-29) attests to the extreme collaborative depths humans and machines have come to in architecture. I spoke with Catie and Wes about what they have planned for the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">conference workshops</a>, taking place October 24-26, and just how close architects are to achieving the singularity.</p><p>You can see our coverage of prior ACADIA conferences <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.</p><p>Listen to&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">One-to-One</a>&nbsp;#42 with&nbsp;<strong>Catie Newell and Wes McGee</strong>:</p><ul><li><strong>iT...</strong></li></ul> America's 'inner city' dichotomy Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-17T14:00:00-04:00 >2016-10-17T14:00:41-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="428" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In reality, the central neighborhoods of many major American cities are thriving. [...] &ldquo;Inner city,&rdquo; in short, is imprecise in describing today&rsquo;s urban reality. It captures neither the true geography of poverty or black America, nor the quality of life in many communities in central cities. But politically, its 1970s-era meaning lingers. [...] But in any context, it is hard to shake the phrase&rsquo;s association with an era when American cities looked very different from the way they do today.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Republican Presidential candidate Donald J. Trump, in recent debates with Hillary Clinton, had referred to the "inner cities" as&nbsp;&ldquo;a disaster education-wise, job-wise, safety-wise, in every way possible,&rdquo; and as places that if "You walk down the street, you get shot."</p><p>In fact-checking response, the&nbsp;<em>Times </em>lays out the drastic improvements in safety and home values that have occurred in these areas since the 1960s and '70s, when the "inner cities" were tagged as centers of violence and drugs. "The inner city is the place that burned when King was assassinated. It was Watts. It was the place Ronald Reagan had to try to conduct the war on drugs,&rdquo; as described by N. D. B. Connolly, historian at Johns Hopkins University.</p><p>Nowadays, the <em>Times</em>&nbsp;referred to&nbsp;a study by the Federal Housing Finance Agency that found an increase in home values in the middle of large cities over the last 25 years&mdash;an uptick happening at a faster pace than anywhere else in the U.S. The article also points to statistics ...</p> MONU #25 looks at Independent Urbanism MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2016-10-17T12:28:00-04:00 >2016-10-21T01:19:05-04:00 <img src="" width="520" height="700" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A city in a country that recently gained independence is likely to undergo processes of radical transformation and massive restructuring and re-imagining that are not only societal, political, and economic in nature, but can also impact the planning system of a city and influence its built-up environment.</p></em><br /><br /><p>A city in a country that recently gained independence is likely to undergo processes of radical transformation and massive restructuring and re-imagining that are not only societal, political, and economic in nature, but can also impact the planning system of a city and influence its built-up environment. <em> <strong>Jasna Mariotti</strong></em> makes this quite clear in her contribution to<strong> MONU</strong>, entitled <strong>"What Ever Happened to Skopje?"</strong>. This new issue of our magazine deals with various phenomena impacting cities of countries that became newly<em><strong> independent</strong></em> which we call <strong>"Independent Urbanism"</strong>. She shows how the centre of Skopje in Macedonia has been remodeled according to an image of the city that never existed as such. Obviously, many<em><strong> "independent" cities</strong></em> are facing major struggles and difficulties in finding their new identity that usually have a lot to do with the fact that the<em> "birth of a country"</em> is a contested process often involving political turmoil, institutional instability, and economic turbulence...</p> Prince's ashes interred in a scale model of Paisley Park Nicholas Korody 2016-10-14T19:14:00-04:00 >2016-10-17T13:54:56-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="556" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>When Paisley Park opened its doors&nbsp;as a museum last Thursday, many fans&nbsp;were surprised to discover that the late singer&rsquo;s ashes were on display in an elaborate custom-designed&nbsp;urn&nbsp;co-designed by Prince&rsquo;s&nbsp;sister Tyka Nelson and nephew President Nelson. Tyka and President teamed up with Foreverence artists to create a scale-model of Paisley Park, measuring 14 inches high and 18 inches long, decorated with Prince&rsquo;s famous symbol&mdash;done in purple, naturally.</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p></p><p>Related:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Prince's Minneapolis estate to become a museum</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Beyonc&eacute; filmed her NOLA-themed "Formation" video at this historic Pasadena mansion</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Take a look at these installations from this year's Coachella Festival</a></li></ul> Airbnb adds a Frank Lloyd Wright home, the Cooke House Julia Ingalls 2016-10-13T20:54:00-04:00 >2016-10-16T23:00:10-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="320" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>There are dozens of Frank Lloyd Wright houses across the country that fans of the architect can visit. There are a handful that can be rented. There is only one where you can sleep overnight for $148, which includes a personal guided tour by the 90-year-old owner and breakfast in a Wright-designed &ldquo;great room.&rdquo; The Cooke House in Virginia Beach, Va., built in 1959, is one of Wright&rsquo;s last commissioned works.</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For more on Frank Lloyd Wright:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Lloyd Wright's LA Samuel-Novarro House for sale</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">When 'Frank Lloyd Wright' and 'historic designation' are holding back your home&rsquo;s value, what&rsquo;s a seller to do?</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New Jersey&rsquo;s Oldest and Largest Frank Lloyd Wright House Listed for $2.2M</a></li></ul> Ettore Sottsass works in David Bowie's Memphis collection head to auction Julia Ingalls 2016-10-13T13:22:00-04:00 >2016-10-16T22:55:32-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="488" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>On November 11th in London, Sotheby's will be auctioning off the late great David Bowie's Memphis, Milano collection, which includes works by architect and designer Ettore Sottsass, Aldo Cibic, and&nbsp;Michele De Lucchi, among others. The works embody the <a href="http://The%20'80s%20strike%20back:%20Memphis%20and%20the%20rebirth%20of%20postmodernism" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Memphis movement</a>'s 1980s philosophy of 'New Design' which basically serves as the thesis for postmodernism, or as the movement's website puts it, "a new expressivity in the form of new shapes, materials and patterns."&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For more on the intersection between music and design:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">David Adjaye is releasing a vinyl record with his brother</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Daniel Libeskind turns 70; designs Musical Labyrinth for Frankfurt Opera</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Prince's Minneapolis estate to become a museum</a></li></ul> Landmarks reveals new renderings for Studio Gang's Natural History Museum expansion project Alyssa Alimurung 2016-10-12T11:23:00-04:00 >2016-10-14T00:06:42-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="304" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In light of the Landmarks Preservation Commission's approval of Jeanne Gang's expansion plan for the American Museum of Natural History, the Commission has revealed a slew of new renderings, which show the $325 million project from various angles, as well as new views of the surrounding parkland. Chairwoman Meenakshi Srinivasan referred to the new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education and Innovation as a &ldquo;stunning piece of architecture&rdquo; and an &ldquo;absolutely wonderful addition.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Driverless cars hit the streets of Milton Keynes Julia Ingalls 2016-10-11T20:49:00-04:00 >2016-10-11T20:49:30-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="203" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Driverless cars will trundle around the UK in their first public trials today. The demonstration of the autonomous electric vehicles is going to take place on the pavements of Milton Keynes. These tests will be the culmination of an 18-month research project which involved virtually mapping the town and updating regulations for driverless vehicles.</p></em><br /><br /><p>For the latest on advances in self-driving cars:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Uber lets you hail its self-driving cars in Pittsburgh later this month</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">How autonomous vehicles will accelerate suburban sprawl</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">This startup hopes to bring autonomous campus shuttles to colleges by 2017</a></li></ul> "Never Built New York" catalogues alternative visions of the City Nicholas Korody 2016-10-11T19:20:00-04:00 >2016-10-14T00:06:34-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="501" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In an alternate reality, a half-mile-diameter dome would enclose much of Manhattan. The dome would regulate the city&rsquo;s temperature and reduce energy consumption, according to the man behind the plan, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">R. Buckminster Fuller</a>. Titled &ldquo;Noah&rsquo;s Ark #2&rdquo;, the fantastical idea actually found a sponsor and the idea went through preliminary feasibility studies.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>This is just one of the 200 unbuilt projects for New York City included in <em>Never Built New York</em>, a new book published by Metropolis Books. Authored by Greg Goldin and Sam Lubell, the book is a follow-up to their popular edition <em>Never Built Los Angeles,</em> and documents unbuilt plans for towers, bridges, parks and airports from the outrageous to the banal.&nbsp;</p><p>An 1870 project by Rufus Henry Gilbert sounds a bit like Elon Musk&rsquo;s <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hyperloop</a>: a series of elevated, pneumatic tubes would propel passengers across the city. Suspended in tall Gothic arches, the tubes would be powered by compressed air.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The Museum of Modern Art building in New York carries ...</p> Bliss out to this tranquil video of an Eames Lounge Chair being assembled by hand Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-11T14:16:00-04:00 >2016-10-14T00:03:38-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>It's like the furniture version of ASMR. This short video from Vitra shows the materials of an Eames Lounge Chair coming together:</p><p></p><p>Mores Eames on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a title="A &ldquo;terrible, enjoyable bloody business&rdquo;: the influential films of Charles and Ray Eames" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A &ldquo;terrible, enjoyable bloody business&rdquo;: the influential films of Charles and Ray Eames</a></li><li><a title="Charles and Ray Eames Explain the Computer Revolution" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Charles and Ray Eames Explain the Computer Revolution</a></li><li><a title="Ice Cube Celebrates The Eames" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Ice Cube Celebrates The Eames</a></li><li><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">An Eames Chair Makeover for Charity</a></p></li></ul> Help fund this Kickstarter for 3D printed maps of Tokyo Julia Ingalls 2016-10-11T13:39:00-04:00 >2016-10-13T23:55:44-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="444" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The confluence of Google mapping, 3D printing and the desire for inventive home decor has produced a&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Kickstarter</a> for One Hundred Tokyo, a fully-fledged three dimensional map of Tokyo that is divided into 100 handy pieces. Pick your favorite palm-sized square(s) or collect all 100; it's up to you and your available display space. Nonetheless, these minutely detailed urban segments are cool/notable both for their immediacy and their accuracy; Zenrin, the same urban data providers that work with Google Maps and Microsoft, have "specially equipped vehicles" that compile the metropolitan deets used to produce the models.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>What else is going on with 3D printing? So glad you asked:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"Curve Appeal" will be globe's first Freeform 3D printed house</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Earth's first 3D printed office created in 17 days for half the labor cost</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Recreation of Palmyra's Arch of Triumph presented in Trafalgar Square</a></li></ul> The absorbing design of China's anti-flood "sponge cities" Julia Ingalls 2016-10-11T13:08:00-04:00 >2016-10-13T23:55:31-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="486" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Is flood mitigation the new frontier in urban planning?&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">China</a>, whose urban centers have regularly been experiencing infrastructure-shuttering floods, is actively encouraging its metropolises to start reshaping themselves to handle the new reality via the so-called "sponge city" program. As an article in<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">&nbsp;The Guardian</a> notes:</p><p><em>The sponge city programme takes inspiration from low impact development in the US, water sensitive urban design in Australia and sustainable drainage systems in the UK.&nbsp;</em></p><p><em>But nothing at this scale has ever been attempted before. &ldquo;The sponge city programme is more comprehensive and ambitious,&rdquo; says WenMei Ha, head of the China water management team at Arcadis, an international urban consultancy which was appointed to this plan by the government.</em></p><p>For more on flood mitigation and the entities trying to rise above it:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Come rain or shine: reviving collective urban form with the GSD's Office for Urbanization</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Designing around sea-level rise in New York</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">At home in a changing cli...</a></li></ul> 'Urban convenience:' when museums move and their effect on the city Alexander Walter 2016-10-10T18:25:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T18:28:58-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="361" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>For all of the dubious attention attracted by the &ldquo;Bilbao Effect&rdquo; theory [...] a more prosaic, and arguably more important aspect of museum location has received little attention: not which city a museum is built in, but where in that city. Locations that would once have seemed inevitable, such as Chicago parkland, are hugely contentious in the 2000s, while locations previously unthinkable in that year &ndash; an abandoned lumbermill in Bilbao [...] &ndash; are now commonplace.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related stories in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Embattled Lucas Museum may move to S.F.'s Treasure Island</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Lawsuit against Lucas Museum holds off (for now)</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">&lsquo;Museum directors hated Bilbao&rsquo;</a></li></ul> This week's picks for London architecture and design events Abigail Banfield 2016-10-10T14:11:00-04:00 >2016-10-13T23:48:52-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="390" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>This week is one of the first in&nbsp;the&nbsp;season to demand a coat. With nights starting to draw in, the temperature dropping, and with many galleries and events opening later in the evenings, now is the perfect time to replace parks with free exhibitions. This year&rsquo;s <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Stirling Prize winning project</a> is one such gallery to visit on a cold, windy October day.</p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Check back regularly</a>&nbsp;to keep up to date with&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">London</a>'s latest happenings and our weekly recommendations!</p><p><strong><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bj&ouml;rk Digital | Open now until 23 October</a></strong></p><p><img alt="" src=""></p><p><em>Image: Somerset House</em></p><p>For fans of both Bj&ouml;rk and Virtual Reality technology, this exhibition hits all the right notes. Somerset house is hosting the European premiere of this unique and experiential showcase; a collaboration from leading visual artists and programmers and iconic performer, Bj&ouml;rk. The latest VR software and techniques are used to create a more personal, &lsquo;futuristic&rsquo; experience of an exclusive&nbsp;performance by the Icelandic singer at the Royal Albert Hall.</p><p><strong><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hyundai Commission: Philippe ...</a></strong></p> Blair Kamin's tempestuous relationship with Donald Trump Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-07T17:38:00-04:00 >2016-10-11T22:06:54-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="434" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Over the years, Trump has courted me, comforted me, criticized me and sent me a handful of sometimes-fawning letters and notes. I saved the correspondence. Wouldn't you? [...] And the missives are telling. Combined with other things he's said and written, they show that Candidate Trump isn't all that different from Developer Trump. He remains a master media manipulator who can be charming, mercurial and vengeful. Only now he wants to be the most powerful man on earth.</p></em><br /><br /><p>In this relatively personal piece for the <em>Tribune</em>, architecture critic Blair Kamin recounts his tumultuous personal and professional relationship with Trump over 10+ years, talking (as developers and architecture critics do) about buildings.</p><p>Kamin explains that there were times when Trump was supportive (regarding a health issue), and praising of his criticism. But whenever the criticism didn't go Trump's way, he bucked at Kamin. Their back-and-forth frothed to a head in 2009, over Kamin's criticism of Trump's condo and hotel tower in Chicago&mdash;before it was emblazoned with the "TRUMP" sign:</p><p><em>"It's a good building," I said, praising the tower's glistening exterior but faulting its uninspired spire and riverfront bulk.</em></p><p><em>There was a pause.</em></p><p><em>"Good?" Trump said, sounding shocked. He had "sucked up" to me for all these years, he said, "and all I get is good?"</em></p><p>When Kamin did criticize the TRUMP signage in 2014, Trump called Kamin&nbsp;"dopey" and "a lightweight". Trump lumps Goldberger and Kamin togethe...</p> Koolhaas speaks at the GSD: architecture is "clearly dedicated to political correctness" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-07T13:05:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T16:02:41-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="975" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>"I see architecture as almost a political work" [...] &ldquo;We are in a radically divided world&rdquo; in which &ldquo;architecture is not dealing with those political issues in a really sophisticated way,&rdquo; [...] &ldquo;I think that both the art world and the architecture world &hellip; [are] pretty intolerant in terms of engaging&rdquo; with political worlds beyond Western democracies."</p></em><br /><br /><p>More recent news from Rem and OMA:</p><ul><li><a title="OMA's plans for Axel Springer building officially released" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">OMA's plans for Axel Springer building officially released</a></li><li><a title="Watch live: Rem Koolhaas is moderating a 12-hour marathon of interviews on the future of Europe" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Watch live: Rem Koolhaas is moderating a 12-hour marathon of interviews on the future of Europe</a></li><li><a title="OMA's hyper Corb" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">OMA's hyper Corb</a></li><li><a title="To thrive post-Zaha, Koolhaas says ZHA should emulate high fashion brands" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">To thrive post-Zaha, Koolhaas says ZHA should emulate high fashion brands</a></li><li><a title='"The first major architect who disconnected the profession completely from angst": Rem on Bjarke' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"The first major architect who disconnected the profession completely from angst": Rem on Bjarke</a></li></ul> Steven Holl's Visual Arts Building opens Oct. 7th at University of Iowa Julia Ingalls 2016-10-06T19:34:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T23:09:37-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="433" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>On Friday October 7th, Steven Holl and&nbsp;Senior Partner Chris McVoy will be on hand to officially open the firm's Visual Arts Building for the University of Iowa, which in addition to being the only building in the United States that uses an integrated hydronic radiant heating and cooling system in combination with a cast-in-place "bubble deck" (thereby eliminating the need to cool or heat air mechanically), is simply gorgeous.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>In a signature Steven Holl move, the interior is illuminated by&nbsp;seven vertical cutouts that are defined by the slide and jostle of the four floors against one another. This shifting dynamic creates opportunities for a series of balconies and informal working spaces.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Check out our conversation with Steven Holl from earlier this week:</p><p></p><p>For the latest on Steven Holl:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"A Dance for Architecture": A conversation with Steven Holl</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Steven Holl designs "concave response" lighting for new visual arts building</a></li></ul> The story behind Didi, China's "Uber Slayer" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-06T18:41:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T23:03:27-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="866" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In August, after a multibillion-dollar, year-and-a-half-long battle, Uber agreed to sell its business in China and depart the country. It was a face-saving retreat for Uber, which got a 17.7 percent ownership stake in Didi and $1 billion in cash. [...] Investors recently valued Didi at $35&nbsp;billion, making it one of the most valuable private companies in the world. Uber, with operations in almost 500&nbsp;cities on six continents, is worth $68&nbsp;billion.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More stories from the Uber-verse:</p><ul><li><a title='The view from inside a self-driving Uber: "the technology is not quite ready"' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The view from inside a self-driving Uber: "the technology is not quite ready"</a></li><li><a title="Uber and the future of on-demand public transit" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Uber and the future of on-demand public transit</a></li><li><a title="Google, Uber, Lyft, Ford and Volvo join forces to lobby for autonomous vehicles" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Google, Uber, Lyft, Ford and Volvo join forces to lobby for autonomous vehicles</a></li><li><a title="Women-only Uber alternatives face pushback from antidiscrimination laws" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Women-only Uber alternatives face pushback from antidiscrimination laws</a></li><li><a title="Paris erupts in riot as taxi drivers protest Uber" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Paris erupts in riot as taxi drivers protest Uber</a></li></ul> "Our architecture works harder than your architecture": Inside the city of Arcosanti Julia Ingalls 2016-10-06T13:03:00-04:00 >2016-10-15T09:14:30-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="430" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Can cities be built not only to be harmonious with their environment, but to outperform traditional architecture? The residents of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Arcosanti, Arizona</a>, which is profiled in this video excerpt from the Atlantic,&nbsp;seem to think so. Part campus, part permanent dwelling, Arcosanti embraces the concept of "arcology," or the blending of ecology and architecture, to create a holistic, tightly engineered mini-metropolis:</p><p><br><em>The City of the Future</em></p> ‘We are building our way to hell’: tales of gentrification around the world Orhan Ayyüce 2016-10-05T19:23:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T21:18:46-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="390" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>My issue is not with areas being improved, it is how gentrification is about one demographic of our society changing an area for themselves and not for the benefit of everyone.</p></em><br /><br /><p><strong>Portland, US: &lsquo;We are currently building our way to hell&rsquo;</strong></p><p>&ldquo;I am a 70 year old carpenter and I have seen more decay in the quality of life in the last three years in&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Portland</a>, Oregon &ndash; pearl of culture in the Great Northwest &ndash; with the one-term mayor &lsquo;Chainsaw Charlie Hales&rsquo; who was previously a lobbyist for the the &lsquo;home builders&rsquo; &ndash; read developers. Towers built into the sky on alluvial soil &ndash; the stuff that turns to pudding in an earthquake. Hundred-year-old classic neighbourhoods injected with &lsquo;cereal box&rsquo; buildings invalidating residents&rsquo; privacy and daylight.</p><p>From my perspective, I would call this a travesty: &lsquo;Bankers gone wild&rsquo;. A spreadsheet vision of creating investments that spread the risk, with total disregard for community culture which, prior to this, was well protected by zoning. The people here have a campaign called&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Stop demolishing Portland</a>. Such beauty is being replaced by such tastelessness, as though the reason the people want to live here is to be housed like gerbi...</p> A fresh start at the Arch League's 2016 Beaux Arts Ball Justine Testado 2016-10-04T21:03:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T00:25:38-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="433" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The Architectural League started another cultural year on a high note at the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">2016 Beaux Arts Ball</a>, which took place&nbsp;at the new nARCHITECTS-designed&nbsp;A/D/O space in Greenpoint, Brooklyn last&nbsp;Friday. Co-chaired by architects&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Calvin Tsao and Zack McKown</a>, this&nbsp;year's &ldquo;Tabula Rasa&rdquo; theme was all about&nbsp;celebrating&nbsp;creativity in progress, the act of fresh-thinking, and New York's ceaseless reinvention. Here are some photos from the event:</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Over 1,200 architects, designers, and friends showed up to the yearly party. In tandem with the Tabula Rasa theme, guests got a good look inside the 23,000 square-foot&nbsp;still-in-progress&nbsp;A/D/O industrial&nbsp;space and were surrounded by&nbsp;natural&nbsp;stone slabs from&nbsp;ABC Worldwide Stone.&nbsp;Chef Fredrik Berselius of the&nbsp;acclaimed&nbsp;Nordic-inspired restaurant&nbsp;Aska curated a menu of light fare.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><em>&ldquo;Table's Clear&rdquo; designed by Ultramoderne.</em></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Ultramoderne</a> designed a site-specific &ldquo;floating tabula rasa&rdquo; installation called&nbsp;&ldquo;Table's Clear&rdquo; for the party. &ldquo;The lightweight fabric hangs i...</p> Geoff Manaugh's "A Burglar's Guide to the City" headed to TV Julia Ingalls 2016-10-04T19:31:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T00:21:59-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="435" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>CBS has given a put pilot commitment to "A Burglar's Guide to the City," a television series based off the book by BLDGBLOG founder&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Geoff Manaugh</a>, who interviewed former bank robbers like&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Joe Loya</a> to explore the role of architecture in crime, and the corresponding shifts in privacy in both the physical and virtual realms. An article by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Deadline</a> describes the thrust of the series thusly:</p><p>"Written by Grellong<em>, A Burglar&rsquo;s Guide to the City</em>&nbsp;centers on a team of modern-day Robin Hoods, led by a brilliant architect with a troubled past. They use their unique skills to gain access to any stronghold in order to steal from rich criminals and give to those who have been wronged by a corrupt system."&nbsp;</p><p>Listen to our conversation with Geoff about the book, recorded earlier this year:</p><p></p><p>For more on the intersection between architecture and Hollywood:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Print #45: Orhan Ayy&uuml;ce interviews "The Wire" actor Bob Wisdom for LA Forum's Summer Issue</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Brad Pitt's "Make It Right" opens LEED-platinum housing complex...</a></li></ul>