Archinect - News 2015-10-10T10:41:07-04:00 AMO designs a "Timeless Ruin" for Miu Miu's 2016 S/S show Nicholas Korody 2015-10-09T15:19:00-04:00 >2015-10-09T15:19:52-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>AMO &ndash; the think tank counterpart to OMA &ndash; extensively works with fashion labels. They've designed stores and runways for brands like Prada and Miu Miu for years, crafting (often) conceptually-charged, and (always) visually-punchy environments to consume the latest and greatest sartorial inventions.</p><p>For the 2016 Spring/Summer Miu Miu show in Paris, AMO designed a large geometric volume &nbsp;clad in reflective industrial materials that served both as backdrop and pathway for the models, who walked around it on Wednesday.<br><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br>Jammed into the hypostyle of August Perret's monumental Palais d'Iena, the structure &ndash; or folly &ndash; is intended to play off the architecture, both obscuring and offering glimpses of the building's famous tapered columns.<br><br>"Timeless Ruin" &ndash; as its called in the press announcement &ndash; is intended to introduce "a dramatic counterpart to the rigorous linearity of the Palais." It's a pleasant-enough name and probably intended to reflect AMO's thinking about Perret's architecture, but ...</p> Archinect's Must-Do Picks for Archtober 2015 - Week 2 (Oct. 9-16) Archinect 2015-10-08T19:01:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T19:04:14-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Looking for exciting things to do in New York City this month? Lucky you, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Archtober</a> is back for another year with a rich program of engaging exhibitions, lectures, conferences, films, tours, parties, and other activities to celebrate the value of architecture and design in everyday life.</p><p>For the fifth year, Archinect &amp; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bustler</a> are proud to once again be Archtober's digital media sponsors.</p><p>From the extensive <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">roster of Archtober events</a>, here are some highlights to take note of from Oct. 9-16:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>Paul Rand Closing Party with Kyle Cooper | Oct. 9</strong></a><br><em>Join us for the grand finale of the exhibition Everything Is Design: The Work of Paul Rand. Star designer Kyle Cooper will reflect on how Rand impacted him as Cooper's teacher at Yale University. Donald Albrecht, MCNY&rsquo;s Curator of Architecture and Design, will join Cooper afterwards for a brief conversation. We will keep the Rand gallery open for late viewing and signature &ldquo;Rand&rdquo; cocktails!</em><br>&nbsp;</li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>National Design Week | Oct. 10-18</strong></a><br><em>National Design Week celebra...</em></li></ul> Mastering behavioral master planning: inside The Global Studio Julia Ingalls 2015-10-08T17:07:00-04:00 >2015-10-09T09:23:10-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="206" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>For his master's architecture thesis, Geoff Piper proposed reorganizing a Kenyan village with an estimated 70% HIV infection rate so that instead of being isolated in their post-colonial individual land plots, people would regularly cross paths. "There was a funeral every few days," Piper explains, "because for people living in these separate plots, it wasn't easy to grasp the extent of the [HIV] problem." By reorganizing the village to create more frequent public meetings, Piper hoped to raise awareness and stop the spread of the disease. A little over a decade later, Piper is now one of the six principal members of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Global Studio</a>, a collaborative design-build organization that teams with non-profits to master plan settlements around the world. The Global Studio's expertise isn't just technical: it's the rare and difficult art of working successfully with people, whether it's the particular culture of non-profits, tenant farmers, or savvy village teens.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>"We're willing and try ver...</p> Damien Hirst's surprisingly restrained gallery space opens in London today Alexander Walter 2015-10-08T15:30:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T15:01:51-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>For an artist who used to chop up cows and ambush people with his foreskin, his new south London HQ is notably subdued. The facade is not encrusted with dead butterflies nor diamond skulls, nor is there the clinical air that his eerie white production facility in Gloucestershire exudes. In fact, it looks a bit like a block of luxury docklands apartments &ndash; a couple of old brick warehouses with a polite in-keeping brick extension. Has the 50-year-old prankster finally grown up?</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Opening of Damien Hirst&rsquo;s new London art space scheduled for October</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Damien Hirst's gallery development draws closer to completition</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Damien Hirst's London art space due to open next spring</a></li></ul> Wim Wenders discusses the role of architecture and landscape in his films Julia Ingalls 2015-10-08T14:06:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T14:06:27-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="328" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>I slowly became more and more of a storyteller and less and less of a painter until I embraced film-making as the only profession that really included everything I liked. It was photography and architecture, music and writing and acting&mdash;everything I liked together into one package that was called &ldquo;film-making&rdquo;.</p></em><br /><br /><p>In an interview with The Economist, film director <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Wim Wenders</a> speaks about the relationship of landscape and architecture in his work, and how focusing on a scene absent of anyone often amplifies the stories of everyone.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>"I try to make places tell their stories about us," he says. Indeed: from "Paris, Texas" to "<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Wings of Desire</a>" to "Pina," Wenders' filmmaking agilely pairs emotional and physical terrain.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Werner Sobek believes we could live in entirely renewable-energy-powered cities by 2020 Julia Ingalls 2015-10-07T15:02:00-04:00 >2015-10-07T15:08:08-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="364" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>After building 2014's&nbsp;Aktivhaus B10, a house that generates twice as much energy as it uses for its own needs via renewable sources, architect <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Werner Sobek</a> believes that we have all the technology we need to live in entirely emissions-free cities in only five years. He also understands that to make this shift, he will need the full support of the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">construction</a> and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">automotive industries</a>.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>&ldquo;The automotive industry is driving forward the creation of ever more powerful, longer-lasting <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">batteries</a>," Sobek said. "At the same time, the construction industry is working on such solutions as a retrofittable building automation system that can noticeably reduce the energy consumption of existing buildings in a very short amount of time.&rdquo;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Sobek believes that <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">the efficient city model</a> could be brought into being via a "Sisterhood Principle" of data sharing, whereby multiple houses, even city districts, exchange information about what energy they are using, storing, and generating, and correspondingly ...</p> Hello Wood's "Project Village" shifts architectural focus from urban to rural Julia Ingalls 2015-10-07T13:41:00-04:00 >2015-10-07T13:57:58-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>What is a village? More importantly, how rapidly can one be formed? The 150 academics, students and practicing architects participating in Project Village set out to answer these questions by constructing an entire community in a week, including a stage, a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">pub</a>, and a residential building.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Because the team, led by&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hello Wood</a>, was assembled from a group of multi-national participants, there was no pre-existing notion of one national architectural heritage. The resulting installations therefore reflected&nbsp;a globalized 21st century cultural context within&nbsp;the sparse infrastructure of a rural setting, and correspondingly referenced issues such as private property, immigration, and multi-faith communities.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Project Village, which debuted in&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hungary</a>, is the first stage of a three year process. According to a press release, "During the first phase the creators have established a Village that&rsquo;s primarily focusing on engaging with communities, generating social interactions and testing it as a ...</p> Cutting across the Chicago Architecture Biennial: Tomás Saraceno's spiders Nicholas Korody 2015-10-07T13:10:00-04:00 >2015-10-07T15:31:20-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>For the first few seconds you&rsquo;re blind in the darkness. Then a reflex forces your pupils wider and your photoreceptor rod cells become more sensitive, sending a neural signal that alerts you to four glowing cubes that seem to be floating in mid-air in front of your body. It takes another few seconds for the glow to connect to its source, illuminate the supports of the plexiglass boxes, and finally render their content legible: a series of startlingly-complex and impossibly-delicate spiderwebs.</p><p>Here drawing back the curtain doesn&rsquo;t destroy the magic. Quite to the contrary, Tom&aacute;s Saraceno&rsquo;s collaboration with various arachnids for the first&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Chicago Architecture Biennial</a> has a power that extends beyond some mere trick of the light and runs deeper than a one-liner about non-human construction. It's a reprise of a project he's exhibited before, notably at&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Tanya Bonakdar Gallery</a>, but within an architectural context it conjures a particular significance.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br>The Argentine-born, Berlin-based Sara...</p> Neutra's Case Study House 20, formerly owned by "The Simpsons" co-creator Sam Simon, is for sale Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-10-07T12:51:00-04:00 >2015-10-10T01:55:31-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>But this is no ordinary celebrity party pad; the unusual property is a showstopper even for the ritzy Pacific Palisades real estate market, and is actually comprised of two different homes. First is Case Study 20 Bailey House, designed by famed architect Richard Neutra and fully restored by Simon. [...] The second part of the estate is a certified LEED Gold, four-bedroom contemporary main house, which Simon built in 2010.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The entire estate, including both Case Study 20 and Simon's 2010 four-bedroom, is listed at $18M.</p> University of Chicago, "where fun comes to die," to get its first ever undergraduate architecture program Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-10-06T18:18:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T22:38:07-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="514" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The art history department recently announced a new minor program in architectural studies, enabling students to pursue a program of study dedicated specifically to architecture for the first time ever. [...] The architectural studies program is currently being offered only as a minor. &ldquo;We would like to set up a dedicated major, perhaps even an interdisciplinary one, in the future,&rdquo; Taylor said, but an option to major specifically in architectural studies is not yet available.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> New Philadelphians and the end of gentrification guilt Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-10-06T13:47:00-04:00 >2015-10-07T12:46:27-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="295" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;There's absolutely nothing wrong with a development that primarily aims to bring new people into the neighborhood, including people who don&rsquo;t have the same profile as the people who already live there,&rdquo; [...] Couldn&rsquo;t the restaurant&rsquo;s cheerleaders see how it was a little sad that in a place where mostly black students had once learned about carpentry and the culinary arts, mostly white people were now drinking ros&eacute;?</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Adam Gopnik on why cities can't win Alexander Walter 2015-10-05T18:28:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T22:56:28-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Cities can&rsquo;t win. When they do well, people resent them as citadels of inequality; when they do badly, they are cesspools of hopelessness. In the seventies and eighties, the seemingly permanent urban crisis became the verdict that American civilization had passed on itself. Forty years later, cities mostly thrive, crime has been in vertiginous decline, the young cluster together in old neighborhoods [...] &mdash;and so big cities turn into hateful centers of self-absorbed privilege.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> ISIS militants have reportedly blown up Palmyra's Arch of Triumph Alexander Walter 2015-10-05T13:13:00-04:00 >2015-10-06T09:04:46-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="337" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Islamic State militants in northern Syria have blown up another monument in the ancient city of Palmyra, officials and local sources say. The Arch of Triumph was "pulverised" by the militants who control the city, a Palmyra activist told AFP news agency. It is thought to have been built about 2,000 years ago. IS fighters have already destroyed two ancient temples at the site, described by Unesco as one of the most important cultural centres of the ancient world.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" target="_blank">ISIS attacks second ancient Palmyra temple this month</a></li><li><a rel="nofollow" href="" target="_blank">ISIS blows up 2,000-year-old Baalshamin temple in Palmyra</a></li><li><a rel="nofollow" href="" target="_blank">ISIS beheads leading archaeologist in Palmyra</a></li><li><a rel="nofollow" href="" target="_blank">ISIL destroys ancient mausoleums in historic Palmyra</a></li></ul> Post-Pizza Hut: photo series looks at how new businesses adapt to that iconic red roof Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-10-05T12:49:00-04:00 >2015-10-05T13:02:31-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="338" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A New Zealand man has set out to document and photograph former Pizza Hut locations across the planet, specifically looking for the pizza chain&rsquo;s dine-in locations with the familiar red roof. [...] &ldquo;The strangest thing may be the funeral homes or mortuaries. It's probably the last thing you'd expect to see a Pizza Hut become but there are several dotted around&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Archinect's Must-Do Picks for Archtober 2015 - Week 1 (Oct. 1-8) Archinect 2015-10-02T21:03:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T22:42:54-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Looking for exciting things to do in New York City this month? Lucky you, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Archtober</a> is back for another year with a rich program of engaging exhibitions, lectures, conferences, films, tours, parties, and other activities to celebrate the value of architecture and design in everyday life!</p><p>From the long, long <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">list of Archtober events</a>, we have picked some exciting highlights to add to your calendar in the first week, Oct. 1-8:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>Dwell on Design New York | Oct. 2-4</strong></a><br><em>Dwell on Design New York upends the standard &ldquo;design show&rdquo; format with a forum that inspires new ideas &amp; a fresh point of view. Designers, architects, manufacturers, makers, and you, come together to evaluate design, solve problems and uncover innovations.</em><br>&nbsp;</li><li><p><strong><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Designers &amp; Books Fair: 2015 | Oct. 2-4</a></strong><br><em>The Designers &amp; Books Fair is the only book fair in the world that focuses on architecture, fashion, graphic design, interior design, product design, and all the other allied design disciplines. Publishers of new books and also rare and out...</em></p></li></ul> Urban Parasites, Data-Driven Urbanism, and the Case for Architecture Orhan Ayyüce 2015-10-02T14:08:00-04:00 >2015-10-05T10:20:59-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>at least some part of architectural practice needs to move on from having buildings as the only output. The answer to every urban question cannot always be a building, clearly. Whilst buildings may be part of some solutions, there are broader, deeper questions in play&mdash;good architects see this, but the practice (from education up) is still not exploring this implied question broadly enough.</p></em><br /><br /><p>A call for architecture, for architects, their schools, their buildings and their cities via the technology they still struggle to grasp regardless of their software driven shaping skills, a valuable read by Dan Hill of City of Sound. Technological effect is elsewhere.</p> Up to 50% of all renting London households are living in poverty Julia Ingalls 2015-10-02T05:26:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T01:25:47-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="341" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>According to an insight study performed by the think tank <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New London Architecture</a>, the dimensions of the London housing crisis are spectacularly bad: 80 percent of all new homes are only affordable to 20 percent of residents, while a near majority of all renting households are living in poverty. The study predicts that the city will add 70,000 residents per year, resulting in a total population of 11 million by 2050 (an increase of 2.4 million from this year's population of 8.6 million).</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Billionaire investors</a> aren't helping the housing shortage: 61 percent of all new homes are bought as investments, without any intention of being occupied by the owners. However, not all is lost: London's relatively low urban density makes it an ideal place for increased housing development, provided that the housing can actually be afforded by the people who intend to live in it.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> A wrap-up of Vancouver's "City Fabric" Julia Ingalls 2015-10-01T19:00:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T01:25:11-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Construction safety netting may not sound like the stuff which picturesque <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">cityscapes</a> are made of, and yet: <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Vancouver, B.C</a>. was host to an art installation known as "City Fabric" this past August and September which produced more gorgeous visuals (and sly references to real estate speculation) than your typical netting.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Designed by artist Rebecca Bayer and architect Matthew Soules, the installation hung beneath the south side of Burrard Street Bridge between concrete piers as a kind of celebration of the ephemeral, specifically "the temporary permanence of construction debris netting; beautiful, impoverished for its utilitarian use, yet profoundly normal."&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The installation, which was sponsored by 221A and The Burred Arts Foundation, officially closed on September 30th and consisted of 800 lineal feet of the netting.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Paris pulls off an (almost) car-free day Julia Ingalls 2015-10-01T15:38:00-04:00 >2015-10-01T15:39:18-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="320" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Paris&rsquo;s car-free day was not without controversy, not least because it wasn&rsquo;t a totally carless day and was limited to only around one-third of the city. After a standoff with police, authorities were only able to make car-free certain parts of the city centre, stretching between Bastille and the Champs Elys&eacute;es, and the outer Bois de Boulogne and Bois de Vincennes, and only between 11am and 6pm. In the rest of the city, cars were allowed but at 20km an hour.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Paris, which had a mostly car-free day on Sunday, September 27th, experienced smog-free blue skies and a largely smiling populace, but it's not the first major metropolis to sort of go pedestrian. During a July weekend in 2011, famously car-centric Los Angeles shut down one of its main transit arteries, the 405 freeway, for infrastructural modification in what was nicknamed "<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Carmaggedon</a>." The stay-off-the-roads frenzy leading up to the closure was so successful that most people took a staycation in their homes, leading city officials to play down the threat the next time the 405 needed to be shut down. (People still needed to spend money to stimulate the local economy, after all.)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Can a loss of driver autonomy save lives? Julia Ingalls 2015-10-01T13:20:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T01:23:56-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Researchers estimate that driverless cars could, by midcentury, reduce traffic fatalities by up to 90 percent. Which means that, using the number of fatalities in 2013 as a baseline, self-driving cars could save 29,447 lives a year. In the United States alone, that's nearly 300,000 fatalities prevented over the course of a decade, and 1.5 million lives saved in a half-century.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Accidents happen. But do they have to? Researchers estimate that driverless cars could save up to $190 billion in health-care costs and 50 million lives worldwide over five decades.&nbsp;</p><p>For more of Archinect's coverage on changes in driving and car culture, check out these stories:</p><p>&bull; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Traffic Lights are Easy to Hack</a></p><p>&bull; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">More roads won't ease traffic, but charging drivers more at peak hours will</a></p><p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="http://From%20California%20to%20Texas,%20car%20culture%20is%20losing%20its%20monopoly" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">From California to Texas, car culture is losing its monopoly</a></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Another Olympics, another story of displacement Alexander Walter 2015-10-01T13:00:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T01:23:45-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="300" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>[...] Team China beat out Team Kazakhstan to host the games. Zhangjiakou, a city of 4 million people in the mountains of Hebei province, will host the games alongside Beijing. [...] They're worried I'll talk to people like Lu Wanku, who will be forced to move to make way for the region&rsquo;s investment boom. Lu herds cattle and has lived in his tiny brick home for more than 20 years. His home is now in the way of a Four Seasons Town Dream Resort ski run. [...] Lu has two weeks to move out.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Olympic Displacement: Atlanta 1996 to Rio 2016</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Putin's Olympic steamroller in Sochi</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Olympic Infrastructure Displaces Brazilian Families</a></li></ul> MMYST: a crowd-funded, human-animal hybrid building by François Roche and Camille Lacadee of New-Territories/M4 Nicholas Korody 2015-09-30T16:14:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T01:08:02-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="391" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>"What we propose here is a different format for making architecture,"&nbsp;Camille Lacadee states in a deadpan tone, "with multiple clients, multiple users, backers, lovers, following a bottom-up mode of exchanges and desire." A robotic arm extends into the frame and offers her a bowl of bird's nest soup, which she takes. "Oh it's hot!"</p><p>Alongside Fran&ccedil;ois Roche,&nbsp;Lacadee&nbsp;heads the&nbsp;ever-mutating, radically-experimental architecture studio currently-known-as <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New-Territories / M4</a>. For their new project&nbsp;MMYST, or "mke_Me_yungR_sheltR_tmptation," they've launched a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Kickstarter campaign</a> that includes what is likely one of the most wonderfully strange videos that's ever been on the crowd-funding website.</p><p><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br>According to the campaign description, MMYST would comprise a 140 sqm (1500 ft&sup2;) "experimental hybrid building" to be shared by humans and swiftlets, a species of bird that makes unique nests out of saliva that are prized for their culinary applications.<br><br>Sited on an outcropping of cooled-lava in th...</p> Paul Goldberger cements Frank Gehry's narrative at The Getty Center Julia Ingalls 2015-09-30T14:24:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T01:11:39-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In a lecture hall that sat a third empty due to the eclipsed "super blood moon" transpiring outside, Paul Goldberger discussed his new biography of Frank Gehry, "Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry" with J. Paul Getty Trust C.E.O.&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">James Cuno at The Getty Center</a>.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Goldberger</a> spent the first part of the evening recounting of the well-known narrative of Gehry's life: a Canadian Jewish working-class boy, Gehry moved from chilly Toronto with his ailing father to the warmer climes of Los Angeles, eventually becoming the city's, if not the world's, most iconic architect.&nbsp;After&nbsp;paying the bills in his early adulthood by driving trucks, Gehry enrolled at <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">USC</a> and then on to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Harvard</a>, where he completed his studies in architecture. He went on to work for a variety of architects including Victor Gruen, and on projects including 1961's so-called "futuristic building" at <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LAX</a> (although, Goldberger was careful to note, in a purely junior capacity). Goldberger framed Gehry's existence not o...</p> Maxwell Anderson Moves back to NYC and the New Cities Foundation Donna Sink 2015-09-29T13:16:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T00:27:29-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="730" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;My growing interest in how cultural districts can shape cities led me to this new, exciting opportunity in New York City.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Maxwell Anderson is returning to New York, to be Director of Grant Programs at The New Cities Foundation.&nbsp; Dallas' loss (and formerly Indianapolis' deeply felt loss) is good urbanism's gain.&nbsp; I am excited about this change in focus by someone who I know to be a great thinker.</p><p>Press release from NCF <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> Designer Jonathan Adler on "creating modern American glamour and eccentricity" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-29T08:48:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T20:49:44-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="664" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>My philosophy is based on: I think everyone deserves a soup&ccedil;on of glamour in every bit of their home. [...] When people look back on early 21st-century design, they will remember: the chaos produced by the technological revolution, a chaos that can be interpreted as either depressingly meaningless or excitingly free.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> "Hitler at Home" by Despina Stratigakos Places Journal 2015-09-28T17:42:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T21:22:11-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="347" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Adolf Hitler was an extreme anti-Semite, convicted traitor, and leader of a violent paramilitary force. In a remarkable press campaign, the Nazis reinvented him as a genial Bavarian gentleman.</p></em><br /><br /><p>How did the Nazis reinvent Adolf Hitler &mdash; an extreme anti-Semite, convicted traitor, and leader of a violent paramilitary force &mdash; as a genial Bavarian gentleman?</p> NASA discovers liquid water on Mars Nicholas Korody 2015-09-28T14:57:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T16:27:45-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="267" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;It took multiple spacecraft over several years to solve this mystery, and now we know there is liquid water on the surface of this cold, desert planet,&rdquo; said Michael Meyer, lead scientist for NASA&rsquo;s Mars Exploration Program at the agency&rsquo;s headquarters in Washington. &ldquo;It seems that the more we study Mars, the more we learn how life could be supported and where there are resources to support life in the future.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p></em><br /><br /><p>In an announcement made this morning, NASA stated that the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has detected "the strongest evidence yet" of liquid water on the fourth planet from the Sun.&nbsp;<br><br>The new evidence emerged from data collected by an imaging spectrometer mounted on the spacecraft, which was launched in 2005 and has been orbiting Mars since 2006. According to the announcement, "researchers detected signatures of hydrated minerals on slopes where mysterious streaks are seen on the Red Planet." The signatures appear to corroborate existing hypotheses.</p><p>Known as recurring slop lineae (RSL), the streaks seem to ebb and flow, apparently in accord with seasonal fluctuations. Previously suggested as an indicator of the presence of water, the discovery of hydrated salts further validates this idea.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br>The salts &ndash; likely a mixture of magnesium perchlorate, magnesium chlorate, and sodium perchlorate &ndash; would help lower the freezing point of what is likely a subsurface flow that occasionally breach...</p> Dismaland, Banksy's anti-capitalist art show, gave host town a £20M boost in tourism Alexander Walter 2015-09-28T14:25:00-04:00 >2015-09-30T09:54:28-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="514" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Over the past five weeks, more than 150,000 people have visited the subversive theme park in a derelict seafront lido, which had been shut since 2000 and reopened in a blaze of publicity on 20 August. [...] But, it is the town's tourist businesses that have reaped the benefit - to the tune of &pound;20m, says Visit Somerset, more than three times what the trade body initially suggested. [...] Everyone has noted the irony of the anti-capitalist art show boosting business.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously:&nbsp;<a href="" target="_blank">Banksy about to open "Dismaland" pop-up exhibition in British seaside resort</a></p> Turning Alvar Aalto's Mount Angel Abbey library into a concert hall Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-25T18:03:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:49:44-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Music ensemble Third Angle will team up with choir group Cappella Romana for a new project, &ldquo;Frozen,&rdquo; on Oct. 3-4. They&rsquo;re giving a voice to one of Oregon&rsquo;s most famous buildings...the Mount Angel Abbey library in St. Benedict, Oregon [...] &ldquo;We&rsquo;re going down into a stairwell and we started singing, and we found a pitch that really resonated the hell out of the building...We want this to be, in effect, a harmony of the building. We want to reimagine the building as an instrument.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Traveling to Chicago soon? seDURST's Scott Durst shares his favorite go-to spots around town Justine Testado 2015-09-25T11:23:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:15:37-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="689" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>No two people, let alone architects, perceive even the most frequented cities in the same way. How do designers experience their cities as locals? Archinect got in touch with Scott Durst, owner of Chicago-based <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">seDURST</a>, who shared a snappy list of go-to places where he likes to spend his "spiritual off-time" around the city.</p><p>Oh, Chicago: Home to nearly 3 million people and, of course, the great abundance of&nbsp; landmarks that draw in some 40 million visitors every year. Moving forward from its rich architectural history, the city will host the very first <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Chicago Architecture Biennial: The State of the Art of Architecture</a>, starting October 3. So whether you're planning your first or your 10th voyage to the Windy City, give Scott Durst's suggestions a whirl. You might discover something new.</p><p>1. <strong>The J. Parker &mdash; Chicago Rooftop Restaurant</strong><br>1816 N Clark Street, 13th Floor, Chicago IL, 60614</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>I recommend this Lincoln Park retreat because it's a roof top bar overlooking Lake Michigan and downtown C...</p>