Archinect - News 2015-10-06T12:32:48-04:00 Adam Gopnik on why cities can't win Alexander Walter 2015-10-05T18:28:00-04:00 >2015-10-06T11:14:33-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Cities can&rsquo;t win. When they do well, people resent them as citadels of inequality; when they do badly, they are cesspools of hopelessness. In the seventies and eighties, the seemingly permanent urban crisis became the verdict that American civilization had passed on itself. Forty years later, cities mostly thrive, crime has been in vertiginous decline, the young cluster together in old neighborhoods [...] &mdash;and so big cities turn into hateful centers of self-absorbed privilege.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> ISIS militants have reportedly blown up Palmyra's Arch of Triumph Alexander Walter 2015-10-05T13:13:00-04:00 >2015-10-06T09:04:46-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="337" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Islamic State militants in northern Syria have blown up another monument in the ancient city of Palmyra, officials and local sources say. The Arch of Triumph was "pulverised" by the militants who control the city, a Palmyra activist told AFP news agency. It is thought to have been built about 2,000 years ago. IS fighters have already destroyed two ancient temples at the site, described by Unesco as one of the most important cultural centres of the ancient world.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" target="_blank">ISIS attacks second ancient Palmyra temple this month</a></li><li><a rel="nofollow" href="" target="_blank">ISIS blows up 2,000-year-old Baalshamin temple in Palmyra</a></li><li><a rel="nofollow" href="" target="_blank">ISIS beheads leading archaeologist in Palmyra</a></li><li><a rel="nofollow" href="" target="_blank">ISIL destroys ancient mausoleums in historic Palmyra</a></li></ul> Post-Pizza Hut: photo series looks at how new businesses adapt to that iconic red roof Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-10-05T12:49:00-04:00 >2015-10-05T13:02:31-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="338" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A New Zealand man has set out to document and photograph former Pizza Hut locations across the planet, specifically looking for the pizza chain&rsquo;s dine-in locations with the familiar red roof. [...] &ldquo;The strangest thing may be the funeral homes or mortuaries. It's probably the last thing you'd expect to see a Pizza Hut become but there are several dotted around&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Archinect's Must-Do Picks for Archtober 2015 - Week 1 (Oct. 1-8) Archinect 2015-10-02T21:03:00-04:00 >2015-10-02T21:13:45-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Looking for exciting things to do in New York City this month? Lucky you, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Archtober</a> is back for another year with a rich program of engaging exhibitions, lectures, conferences, films, tours, parties, and other activities to celebrate the value of architecture and design in everyday life!</p><p>From the long, long <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">list of Archtober events</a>, we have picked some exciting highlights to add to your calendar in the first week, Oct. 1-8:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>Dwell on Design New York | Oct. 2-4</strong></a><br><em>Dwell on Design New York upends the standard &ldquo;design show&rdquo; format with a forum that inspires new ideas &amp; a fresh point of view. Designers, architects, manufacturers, makers, and you, come together to evaluate design, solve problems and uncover innovations.</em><br>&nbsp;</li><li><p><strong><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Designers &amp; Books Fair: 2015 | Oct. 2-4</a></strong><br><em>The Designers &amp; Books Fair is the only book fair in the world that focuses on architecture, fashion, graphic design, interior design, product design, and all the other allied design disciplines. Publishers of new books and also rare and out...</em></p></li></ul> Urban Parasites, Data-Driven Urbanism, and the Case for Architecture Orhan Ayyüce 2015-10-02T14:08:00-04:00 >2015-10-05T10:20:59-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>at least some part of architectural practice needs to move on from having buildings as the only output. The answer to every urban question cannot always be a building, clearly. Whilst buildings may be part of some solutions, there are broader, deeper questions in play&mdash;good architects see this, but the practice (from education up) is still not exploring this implied question broadly enough.</p></em><br /><br /><p>A call for architecture, for architects, their schools, their buildings and their cities via the technology they still struggle to grasp regardless of their software driven shaping skills, a valuable read by Dan Hill of City of Sound. Technological effect is elsewhere.</p> Up to 50% of all renting London households are living in poverty Julia Ingalls 2015-10-02T05:26:00-04:00 >2015-10-01T14:30:54-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="341" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>According to an insight study performed by the think tank <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New London Architecture</a>, the dimensions of the London housing crisis are spectacularly bad: 80 percent of all new homes are only affordable to 20 percent of residents, while a near majority of all renting households are living in poverty. The study predicts that the city will add 70,000 residents per year, resulting in a total population of 11 million by 2050 (an increase of 2.4 million from this year's population of 8.6 million).</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Billionaire investors</a> aren't helping the housing shortage: 61 percent of all new homes are bought as investments, without any intention of being occupied by the owners. However, not all is lost: London's relatively low urban density makes it an ideal place for increased housing development, provided that the housing can actually be afforded by the people who intend to live in it.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> A wrap-up of Vancouver's "City Fabric" Julia Ingalls 2015-10-01T19:00:00-04:00 >2015-10-01T20:26:08-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Construction safety netting may not sound like the stuff which picturesque <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">cityscapes</a> are made of, and yet: <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Vancouver, B.C</a>. was host to an art installation known as "City Fabric" this past August and September which produced more gorgeous visuals (and sly references to real estate speculation) than your typical netting.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Designed by artist Rebecca Bayer and architect Matthew Soules, the installation hung beneath the south side of Burrard Street Bridge between concrete piers as a kind of celebration of the ephemeral, specifically "the temporary permanence of construction debris netting; beautiful, impoverished for its utilitarian use, yet profoundly normal."&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The installation, which was sponsored by 221A and The Burred Arts Foundation, officially closed on September 30th and consisted of 800 lineal feet of the netting.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Paris pulls off an (almost) car-free day Julia Ingalls 2015-10-01T15:38:00-04:00 >2015-10-01T15:39:18-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="320" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Paris&rsquo;s car-free day was not without controversy, not least because it wasn&rsquo;t a totally carless day and was limited to only around one-third of the city. After a standoff with police, authorities were only able to make car-free certain parts of the city centre, stretching between Bastille and the Champs Elys&eacute;es, and the outer Bois de Boulogne and Bois de Vincennes, and only between 11am and 6pm. In the rest of the city, cars were allowed but at 20km an hour.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Paris, which had a mostly car-free day on Sunday, September 27th, experienced smog-free blue skies and a largely smiling populace, but it's not the first major metropolis to sort of go pedestrian. During a July weekend in 2011, famously car-centric Los Angeles shut down one of its main transit arteries, the 405 freeway, for infrastructural modification in what was nicknamed "<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Carmaggedon</a>." The stay-off-the-roads frenzy leading up to the closure was so successful that most people took a staycation in their homes, leading city officials to play down the threat the next time the 405 needed to be shut down. (People still needed to spend money to stimulate the local economy, after all.)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Can a loss of driver autonomy save lives? Julia Ingalls 2015-10-01T13:20:00-04:00 >2015-10-01T13:11:06-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Researchers estimate that driverless cars could, by midcentury, reduce traffic fatalities by up to 90 percent. Which means that, using the number of fatalities in 2013 as a baseline, self-driving cars could save 29,447 lives a year. In the United States alone, that's nearly 300,000 fatalities prevented over the course of a decade, and 1.5 million lives saved in a half-century.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Accidents happen. But do they have to? Researchers estimate that driverless cars could save up to $190 billion in health-care costs and 50 million lives worldwide over five decades.&nbsp;</p><p>For more of Archinect's coverage on changes in driving and car culture, check out these stories:</p><p>&bull; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Traffic Lights are Easy to Hack</a></p><p>&bull; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">More roads won't ease traffic, but charging drivers more at peak hours will</a></p><p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="http://From%20California%20to%20Texas,%20car%20culture%20is%20losing%20its%20monopoly" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">From California to Texas, car culture is losing its monopoly</a></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Another Olympics, another story of displacement Alexander Walter 2015-10-01T13:00:00-04:00 >2015-10-01T13:08:11-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="300" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>[...] Team China beat out Team Kazakhstan to host the games. Zhangjiakou, a city of 4 million people in the mountains of Hebei province, will host the games alongside Beijing. [...] They're worried I'll talk to people like Lu Wanku, who will be forced to move to make way for the region&rsquo;s investment boom. Lu herds cattle and has lived in his tiny brick home for more than 20 years. His home is now in the way of a Four Seasons Town Dream Resort ski run. [...] Lu has two weeks to move out.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Olympic Displacement: Atlanta 1996 to Rio 2016</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Putin's Olympic steamroller in Sochi</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Olympic Infrastructure Displaces Brazilian Families</a></li></ul> MMYST: a crowd-funded, human-animal hybrid building by François Roche and Camille Lacadee of New-Territories/M4 Nicholas Korody 2015-09-30T16:14:00-04:00 >2015-10-05T13:04:10-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="391" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>"What we propose here is a different format for making architecture,"&nbsp;Camille Lacadee states in a deadpan tone, "with multiple clients, multiple users, backers, lovers, following a bottom-up mode of exchanges and desire." A robotic arm extends into the frame and offers her a bowl of bird's nest soup, which she takes. "Oh it's hot!"</p><p>Alongside Fran&ccedil;ois Roche,&nbsp;Lacadee&nbsp;heads the&nbsp;ever-mutating, radically-experimental architecture studio currently-known-as <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New-Territories / M4</a>. For their new project&nbsp;MMYST, or "mke_Me_yungR_sheltR_tmptation," they've launched a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Kickstarter campaign</a> that includes what is likely one of the most wonderfully strange videos that's ever been on the crowd-funding website.</p><p><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br>According to the campaign description, MMYST would comprise a 140 sqm (1500 ft&sup2;) "experimental hybrid building" to be shared by humans and swiftlets, a species of bird that makes unique nests out of saliva that are prized for their culinary applications.<br><br>Sited on an outcropping of cooled-lava in th...</p> Paul Goldberger cements Frank Gehry's narrative at The Getty Center Julia Ingalls 2015-09-30T14:24:00-04:00 >2015-09-30T17:28:58-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In a lecture hall that sat a third empty due to the eclipsed "super blood moon" transpiring outside, Paul Goldberger discussed his new biography of Frank Gehry, "Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry" with J. Paul Getty Trust C.E.O.&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">James Cuno at The Getty Center</a>.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Goldberger</a> spent the first part of the evening recounting of the well-known narrative of Gehry's life: a Canadian Jewish working-class boy, Gehry moved from chilly Toronto with his ailing father to the warmer climes of Los Angeles, eventually becoming the city's, if not the world's, most iconic architect.&nbsp;After&nbsp;paying the bills in his early adulthood by driving trucks, Gehry enrolled at <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">USC</a> and then on to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Harvard</a>, where he completed his studies in architecture. He went on to work for a variety of architects including Victor Gruen, and on projects including 1961's so-called "futuristic building" at <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LAX</a> (although, Goldberger was careful to note, in a purely junior capacity). Goldberger framed Gehry's existence not o...</p> Maxwell Anderson Moves back to NYC and the New Cities Foundation Donna Sink 2015-09-29T13:16:00-04:00 >2015-09-30T08:50:35-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="730" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;My growing interest in how cultural districts can shape cities led me to this new, exciting opportunity in New York City.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Maxwell Anderson is returning to New York, to be Director of Grant Programs at The New Cities Foundation.&nbsp; Dallas' loss (and formerly Indianapolis' deeply felt loss) is good urbanism's gain.&nbsp; I am excited about this change in focus by someone who I know to be a great thinker.</p><p>Press release from NCF <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> Designer Jonathan Adler on "creating modern American glamour and eccentricity" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-29T08:48:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T20:49:44-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="664" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>My philosophy is based on: I think everyone deserves a soup&ccedil;on of glamour in every bit of their home. [...] When people look back on early 21st-century design, they will remember: the chaos produced by the technological revolution, a chaos that can be interpreted as either depressingly meaningless or excitingly free.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> "Hitler at Home" by Despina Stratigakos Places Journal 2015-09-28T17:42:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T21:22:11-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="347" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Adolf Hitler was an extreme anti-Semite, convicted traitor, and leader of a violent paramilitary force. In a remarkable press campaign, the Nazis reinvented him as a genial Bavarian gentleman.</p></em><br /><br /><p>How did the Nazis reinvent Adolf Hitler &mdash; an extreme anti-Semite, convicted traitor, and leader of a violent paramilitary force &mdash; as a genial Bavarian gentleman?</p> NASA discovers liquid water on Mars Nicholas Korody 2015-09-28T14:57:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T16:27:45-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="267" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;It took multiple spacecraft over several years to solve this mystery, and now we know there is liquid water on the surface of this cold, desert planet,&rdquo; said Michael Meyer, lead scientist for NASA&rsquo;s Mars Exploration Program at the agency&rsquo;s headquarters in Washington. &ldquo;It seems that the more we study Mars, the more we learn how life could be supported and where there are resources to support life in the future.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p></em><br /><br /><p>In an announcement made this morning, NASA stated that the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has detected "the strongest evidence yet" of liquid water on the fourth planet from the Sun.&nbsp;<br><br>The new evidence emerged from data collected by an imaging spectrometer mounted on the spacecraft, which was launched in 2005 and has been orbiting Mars since 2006. According to the announcement, "researchers detected signatures of hydrated minerals on slopes where mysterious streaks are seen on the Red Planet." The signatures appear to corroborate existing hypotheses.</p><p>Known as recurring slop lineae (RSL), the streaks seem to ebb and flow, apparently in accord with seasonal fluctuations. Previously suggested as an indicator of the presence of water, the discovery of hydrated salts further validates this idea.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br>The salts &ndash; likely a mixture of magnesium perchlorate, magnesium chlorate, and sodium perchlorate &ndash; would help lower the freezing point of what is likely a subsurface flow that occasionally breach...</p> Dismaland, Banksy's anti-capitalist art show, gave host town a £20M boost in tourism Alexander Walter 2015-09-28T14:25:00-04:00 >2015-09-30T09:54:28-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="514" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Over the past five weeks, more than 150,000 people have visited the subversive theme park in a derelict seafront lido, which had been shut since 2000 and reopened in a blaze of publicity on 20 August. [...] But, it is the town's tourist businesses that have reaped the benefit - to the tune of &pound;20m, says Visit Somerset, more than three times what the trade body initially suggested. [...] Everyone has noted the irony of the anti-capitalist art show boosting business.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Previously:&nbsp;<a href="" target="_blank">Banksy about to open "Dismaland" pop-up exhibition in British seaside resort</a></p> Turning Alvar Aalto's Mount Angel Abbey library into a concert hall Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-25T18:03:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:49:44-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Music ensemble Third Angle will team up with choir group Cappella Romana for a new project, &ldquo;Frozen,&rdquo; on Oct. 3-4. They&rsquo;re giving a voice to one of Oregon&rsquo;s most famous buildings...the Mount Angel Abbey library in St. Benedict, Oregon [...] &ldquo;We&rsquo;re going down into a stairwell and we started singing, and we found a pitch that really resonated the hell out of the building...We want this to be, in effect, a harmony of the building. We want to reimagine the building as an instrument.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Traveling to Chicago soon? seDURST's Scott Durst shares his favorite go-to spots around town Justine Testado 2015-09-25T11:23:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:15:37-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="689" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>No two people, let alone architects, perceive even the most frequented cities in the same way. How do designers experience their cities as locals? Archinect got in touch with Scott Durst, owner of Chicago-based <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">seDURST</a>, who shared a snappy list of go-to places where he likes to spend his "spiritual off-time" around the city.</p><p>Oh, Chicago: Home to nearly 3 million people and, of course, the great abundance of&nbsp; landmarks that draw in some 40 million visitors every year. Moving forward from its rich architectural history, the city will host the very first <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Chicago Architecture Biennial: The State of the Art of Architecture</a>, starting October 3. So whether you're planning your first or your 10th voyage to the Windy City, give Scott Durst's suggestions a whirl. You might discover something new.</p><p>1. <strong>The J. Parker &mdash; Chicago Rooftop Restaurant</strong><br>1816 N Clark Street, 13th Floor, Chicago IL, 60614</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>I recommend this Lincoln Park retreat because it's a roof top bar overlooking Lake Michigan and downtown C...</p> Photographing 5,000+ pubs in London Julia Ingalls 2015-09-25T05:44:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:13:37-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>For the past seven years, Ewan has been painstakingly researching London's pubs, both past and present, cataloguing them and taking photos before uploading details to his online database Pubology...his mission is to photograph every pub in London &ndash; although, as he tells me, it's difficult to know just how close he is to that goal.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Estimating the total number of pubs in London at somewhere around 5,000, photographer Ewan Munro has tried to draw some distinctions to limit the scope of his massive project. For example, how does one define <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">London</a>, and how does one define a pub versus a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">bar</a>?</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>From historic, centuries-old establishments to modern shipping container drinkeries, Munro has managed to assemble an impressive architectural <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">archive</a> of pub photos: cheers to that.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> London's Garden Bridge endangered by public funding shortfall Julia Ingalls 2015-09-25T04:34:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:13:14-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The London garden bridge project has been placed in jeopardy after a London council withdrew its support because of public costs and the Labour mayoral candidate, Sadiq Khan, said he would ditch the proposed horticultural Thames river crossing if he took office.</p></em><br /><br /><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Thomas Heatherwick</a>'s proposed Garden Bridge, which recently inspired <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">a satirical contest of unpalatable entries</a>, may be doomed to remain a hotly contested rendering. The &pound;30 million of public funds needed to fund the bridge has temporarily been withdrawn because Lambeth council leader Lib Peck said the cost is "unjustified." Both current <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mayor Boris Johnson</a>&nbsp;and chancellor George Osborne have pledged &pound;30 million of his own to the project, but it will still need additional funding to bridge the gap.</p> Searching for Queen Elizabeth's architectural legacy Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-25T03:53:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:12:14-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="648" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Elizabeth II is the first major British monarch who will not have an architectural style named after her [...] The present Elizabethan era includes as many as a dozen architectural highlights and at least two broad architectural styles. &ldquo;I cannot imagine a term or an argument that would tie all of this together,&rdquo; says Stanford Anderson, a professor emeritus of history and architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. &ldquo;'New Elizabethan architecture&rsquo; just ducks the question.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> MASS Design Group to propose "Bauhaus of Africa" at U.N. Summit Julia Ingalls 2015-09-24T18:59:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:11:59-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="316" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>On September 27th, the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MASS Design Group</a> will officially present their idea for a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bauhaus-type</a> school for Sub-Saharan Africa at the United Nations Solutions Summit. The proposed program would be based in Kigali, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Rwanda</a> and would purposefully "incubate local innovation towards tackling the biggest building boom of the next quarter century" according to a press release issued by MASS.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>This building boom refers to the estimated addition of one billion Africans over the next two decades, while the project's name refers to the infamous 20th century Bauhaus school, which encouraged not only theory, but actual practice, resulting in a widespread adoption of modernism. This practice element will be crucial in a nation which will require massive amounts of new (and hopefully, artfully designed) infrastructure.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Archinect's critical round-up of LACMA's Frank Gehry exhibition Julia Ingalls 2015-09-24T15:04:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:11:37-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="309" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>While the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LACMA</a>'s retrospective of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Frank Gehry</a>&nbsp;is based off a previous show organized last year at the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Centre Pompidou</a>, Mus&eacute;e National d&rsquo;Art Moderne, its Los Angeles locale (plus an additional gallery not present at the Paris show) provides a different context. Some critics took a fawning approach to the show; others looked at the work in the context of Gehry's recent undertaking of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">the redevelopment of the Los Angeles River</a>, and his history in Los Angeles generally.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>KCRW's resident art critic <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Edward Goldman</a> said that "LACMA, with its unique history of collaboration with Frank Gehry as a designer for a number of the museum's high profile exhibitions, was able not only to deliver a thoroughly researched lecture, but also succeeded to bring us, visitors, inside his studio and even inside his mind." Goldman, who marveled at how lovely it would be to travel to Minneapolis to see the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Frederick R. Weisman Museum</a>, gushed that "it's simply amazing how prolific and unstoppable Gehry has been ...</p> Archinect's critical round-up of Los Angeles' Broad Museum Julia Ingalls 2015-09-23T15:50:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:40:34-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="381" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>From a super-sized cheese grater, to a&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">contraceptive sponge</a>, to an inadvertent fun house ride, the critics have thoroughly analogized the new Broad museum in mostly positive (if occasionally biting) reviews. To follow up with&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Amelia's review, published earlier today</a>, we offer some other critical perspectives on LA's latest architectural landmark.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The L.A. Times</a>' Christopher Hawthorne frames the museum's relative success principally in terms of the political and physical struggle it took to realize it (Broad is currently suing the structure's skin fabricators for what he claims were costly, time-delaying fabrication errors). "It wouldn't be fair to say that the museum, which has moments of real charm, buckles under the burden of those expectations and conflicts. But in a number of places, including its surprisingly punchless facade, it shows the considerable strain of holding up that weight."</p><p>Hawthorne also reflects on the building in terms of&nbsp;Diller Scofidio + Renfro's overall body of...</p> A bicyclist's perspective on the dangers and joys of riding in L.A. Julia Ingalls 2015-09-23T15:49:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:40:27-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>While you&rsquo;re hypertensive in traffic listening to NPR, I have seen dolphins frolicking (and homeless men fighting over a shopping cart); I&rsquo;ve smelled the taco trucks and heard all the languages of kids playing at morning recess. I sweat and shiver; I feel elation and real fear. In short, I feel alive. And so I ride.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Despite its annoyances, difficulties, and outright dangers, Peter Flax's take on bicycle riding in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">L.A.</a>&mdash;prompted in part by the city's recent decision "to create hundreds of miles of new protected bike lanes, shrinking some streets in the process"&mdash;combines a reporter's clear-eyed sensibility with an enthusiast's joy. In what is apparently an all-too typical encounter, he describes an&nbsp;incident with&nbsp;a dangerous driver: "Once, on Curson near Pico, a black Mercedes swerved into my path and the side mirror grazed my hip. I rolled up to the guy&rsquo;s driver&rsquo;s side window at a red light; he had his phone on his lap, watching a video. Without saying a word, I just rode away, bewildered and angry."&nbsp;</p><p>Want to read more on bicycling developments in L.A.&nbsp;and beyond? Click below:</p><p>&bull; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LA Gets its First Parking-Protected Bike Lanes</a></p><p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">From California to Texas, car culture is losing its monopoly</a></p><p>&bull; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Protected bike lanes strengthen city economy, report finds</a></p>... "They should grow up": Frank Gehry to critics of his involvement with the L.A. River Julia Ingalls 2015-09-23T14:18:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:40:18-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Mia Lehrer, a Los Angeles landscape architect who helped prepare a master plan for the river in 2007, said Mr. Gehry&rsquo;s involvement had distressed people wary of top-down directives, and raised fears that he would derail the plan by the Army Corps of Engineers just as it was gaining momentum. Still, she said Mr. Gehry was welcome to join the fray. &ldquo;He&rsquo;s a creative dude,&rdquo; Ms. Lehrer said. &ldquo;So the answer is, &lsquo;Why not?&rsquo;&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Perhaps to escape the local ire which his involvement with the L.A. River redevelopment has drawn, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Frank Gehry</a> talked to The New York Times about his hopes for the project and for his relationship with the community. "I&rsquo;m doing something that&rsquo;s going to be good and trying to be inclusive, and they are trying to cut me up before I even get out of the gate. That&rsquo;s not nice. I don&rsquo;t want to create a fight with them, but they should grow up," he said.</p><p>For more on Gehry's involvement with the L.A. River, do read:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gehry to prioritize hydrology in LA River revitalization strategy</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gehry enlisted to masterplan LA River redevelopment</a></li></ul> A neuroscientist's approach to urban design Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-23T12:50:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:39:39-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="275" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In past experiments, [neuroscientist Colin Ellard] monitored sweat glands with special wristbands to measure stress levels. In Toronto, he has added special headbands that measure brain waves. [...] &ldquo;I think this kind of research, by showing how people respond to the places that are here, can highlight some of the key principles that can be useful in designing better public places.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>More on the intersection of brain sciences and cities:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">AfterShock #4: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Neuroscientific Architecture Research</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">AfterShock #3: Brains and the City</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Further strides made in Nobel-winning research on the neuroscience of navigation</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Brain on Architecture</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Developing an "urban neuroscience" to build better cities</a></li></ul> Los Angeles to declare homelessness in the city an 'emergency' and pledge $100 million Alexander Walter 2015-09-22T13:46:00-04:00 >2015-09-22T13:48:23-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Los Angeles elected leaders announced Tuesday that they will declare a &ldquo;state of emergency&rdquo; on the growing homelessness problem in the city and commit $100 million toward housing and other services for homeless people. [...] "If we want to be a great city that hosts the Olympics and shows itself off to the world,&rdquo; Cedillo said, &ldquo;we shouldn't have 25,000 to 50,000 people sleeping on the streets.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Los Angeles funds $213M policy to end chronic homelessness</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Low-income housing in Los Angeles: A look at the past, present and future</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">In Los Angeles, homelessness is becoming more visible</a></li></ul> Why companies are having employees unplug and find solutions with LEGOs Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-22T12:54:00-04:00 >2015-09-22T12:54:18-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>As the fast pace of technology calls for innovative, out-of-the-box thinking, corporations are looking for more unusual approaches to meet the challenges they face, often with &ldquo;hands-on&rdquo; or &ldquo;unplugged&rdquo; approaches. If LEGO is about anything, it&rsquo;s the use of one&rsquo;s hands while the mind is in an unplugged state. LEGO Serious Play capitalizes on this by asking the hands to find a solution that the mind hasn&rsquo;t been able to on its own.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More on the many uses of LEGO:</p><ul><li><a title="LEGO Architecture launches new student acoustic-design challenge to restore a destroyed music theater" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LEGO Architecture launches new student acoustic-design challenge to restore a destroyed music theater</a></li><li><a title="Olafur Eliasson Wants You to Design Utopia (Out of Legos)" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Olafur Eliasson Wants You to Design Utopia (Out of Legos)</a></li><li><a title="Could Lego Architecture Studio actually be useful for architects?" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Could Lego Architecture Studio actually be useful for architects?</a></li><li><a title="Learning From Legos" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Learning From Legos</a></li></ul>