Archinect - News 2016-10-24T01:20:44-04:00 British construction criticised for lack of innovation by government report Ellen Hancock 2016-10-20T11:47:00-04:00 >2016-10-20T11:47:23-04:00 <img src="" width="642" height="428" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The review highlights the sector&rsquo;s dysfunctional training model, its lack of innovation and collaboration, and its non-existent research and development culture. Low productivity continues to hamper the sector, while recent high levels of cost inflation, driven by a shortage of workers, has stalled numerous housing schemes as they have become too expensive to build.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Read more UK industry news here:&nbsp;</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mayor of London launches probe into the impact of foreign investment in city's real estate</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Engineering giant Arup announces imminent layoffs following Brexit vote</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The former-football stars tackling England's affordable housing shortage</a></li></ul> AECOM to build $1B electric vehicle plant in Vegas Nicholas Korody 2016-10-19T19:08:00-04:00 >2016-10-19T23:01:32-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="428" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Aecom, America&rsquo;s largest design engineer, will have its skills tested with a contract to build a high-tech factory for Chinese electric vehicle start-up Faraday Future (FF) in Las Vegas. The work will have a construction value of $500m, signed on a guaranteed maximum price basis, but FF has said in the past it wants the factory built in half the normal time. In all, FF is reported to be investing $1bn in its new plant.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Netherlands considers a ban on gasoline-powered vehicles</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Faraday Future holds groundbreaking ceremony for $1B Nevada factory</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The "Impossible" Car &ndash; Faraday Future's lead designer, Richard Kim, on One-to-One #17</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Wired takes a look inside Tesla's car factory of the future</a></li></ul> Five Can’t-Miss ARE Updates from NCARB Sponsor 2016-10-19T09:00:00-04:00 >2016-10-19T12:17:34-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img title="" alt="" src=""></a><em><strong>This post is brought to you by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">PPI</a>.</strong></em><br>&nbsp;<p>It&rsquo;s an exciting time to be an ARE candidate. With the release of ARE 5.0, new information is revealing itself daily. Keeping up with these updates can be difficult, but not impossible. Read on to discover essential ARE updates from NCARB that will help you on your path to licensure.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>1. Earn a $100 Gift Card by Contributing to the Cut Score</strong></p><p>If you&rsquo;re among the first 600 candidates to take the ARE, not only will you contribute to the cut score (defined points on the score scale that determine the passing standard), but you will receive a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">$100 gift card from NCARB</a>. NCARB will temporarily hold the release of ARE 5.0 score reports until the cut score of each division is decided, so encourage other ARE 5.0 candidates you know to test early.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><strong>2. Navigate the New Testing Interface with NCARB&rsquo;s Demo Exam</strong></p><p>The <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">ARE 5.0 Demonstration Exam</a> is an interactive tool that helps you become familiar with the interface of the new test, and can be accessed easily through yo...</p> Uber takes to the skies with a new advertising strategy in Mexico DF Nicholas Korody 2016-10-17T18:45:00-04:00 >2016-10-18T11:15:38-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="433" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Mexico City is notorious for its gridlock (and the smog it produces). The ride-sharing platform Uber has taken advantage of this captive audience with an unusual advertising medium: drones.</p><p>As reported by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bloomberg</a>, Uber has sent off a fleet of sign-bearing drones to hover over windshields. &ldquo;Driving by yourself?&rdquo; asks one in Spanish. &ldquo;That&rsquo;s why you can never see the volcanoes.&rdquo;</p><p>Mexico City represents Uber&rsquo;s biggest market, so the unique (and aggressive) advertising strategy makes some sense. No word yet on any drone-provoked fender benders.</p><p>For more on Uber and its influence on cities, follow these links:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The view from inside a self-driving Uber: "the technology is not quite ready"</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Uber and the future of on-demand public transit</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Uber lets you hail its self-driving cars in Pittsburgh later this month</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New study finds ride-sharing apps like Lyft and Uber have no effect on drunk-driving fatalities</a></li></ul> One-to-One #42 with ACADIA workshop co-chairs Catie Newell and Wes McGee Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-17T17:25:00-04:00 >2016-10-23T23:24:34-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="421" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Aside from their role as workshop co-chairs for the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">ACADIA</a> conference, this week's One-to-One guests are both architects who work and teach at&nbsp;Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan. Their focus on fabrication led them to their roles at ACADIA, with McGee directing Taubman's FABLab and Newell serving as Director of the Master of Science in Material Systems and Digital Technologies.</p><p>ACADIA stands for the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture, and this year's conference, "Posthuman Frontiers: Data, Designers and Cognitive Machines" (October 27-29) attests to the extreme collaborative depths humans and machines have come to in architecture. I spoke with Catie and Wes about what they have planned for the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">conference workshops</a>, taking place October 24-26, and just how close architects are to achieving the singularity.</p><p>You can see our coverage of prior ACADIA conferences <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.</p><p>Listen to&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">One-to-One</a>&nbsp;#42 with&nbsp;<strong>Catie Newell and Wes McGee</strong>:</p><ul><li><strong>iT...</strong></li></ul> Could property ownership be automated? Nicholas Korody 2016-10-17T13:25:00-04:00 >2016-10-21T01:18:21-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="488" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>What&rsquo;s extraordinary about a smart contract is that it gives blockchain the power to not only record property rights but enforce them. Once deployed, a dozen lines of computer code can fulfill the same role as the county records office, the courts and the police. You can have &ldquo;the function of a trusted bureaucracy without the expense of putting together a trusted bureaucracy&rdquo;, Waldman explains.</p></em><br /><br /><p><em>The homeowner posts a price for the rental. The renter sends the money through her smartphone. Inside the front door is a very small computer connected to the internet. The computer knows when the renter is allowed to enter and unlocks the door for her when she pushes a button on her phone.</em></p><p>Smart contracts run on blockchain ledgers, the same technology that enables Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. For more on the possible spatial ramifications of this technology, check out some past Archinect coverage:</p><ul><li><a href="" target="_blank">Towards a decentralized architecture with FOAM + the Blockchain</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">The rise of the blockchain beyond cryptocurrencies</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">Airbnb invests in a blockchain future</a></li></ul> Digital Demands in Architecture: Kennesaw State remedies digital expansion for students Sponsor 2016-10-17T09:00:00-04:00 >2016-10-12T17:58:19-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="425" border="0" title="" alt="" /><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img title="" alt="" src=""></a><em><strong>This post is brought to you by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Kennesaw State University</a>.</strong></em><br>&nbsp;<p>Architecture&rsquo;s relationship to technology is as old as the primitive hut. Material and construction technologies have shaped design and detailing throughout history. But with the dawn of the information age came a new category of technologies that have shaped architecture in fresh new ways. Initially, these digital programs were treated as an extension of Representation theory. For architects, the debut of AutoCAD and form<strong>&middot;</strong>Z would prove transformative similarly to the way the plan and section impacted architectural theory and practice during the Renaissance. Prospects of virtual reality in the 1990s had architectural theorists musing on the possible obsolescence of brick and mortar buildings.</p><p>By the late 1990s, computer-aided design products like AutoCAD had become a standard tool in architectural offices. In response, the academy speculated on the elimination of the traditional art studio concept with its drafting tables, opt...</p> Airbnb adds a Frank Lloyd Wright home, the Cooke House Julia Ingalls 2016-10-13T20:54:00-04:00 >2016-10-16T23:00:10-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="320" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>There are dozens of Frank Lloyd Wright houses across the country that fans of the architect can visit. There are a handful that can be rented. There is only one where you can sleep overnight for $148, which includes a personal guided tour by the 90-year-old owner and breakfast in a Wright-designed &ldquo;great room.&rdquo; The Cooke House in Virginia Beach, Va., built in 1959, is one of Wright&rsquo;s last commissioned works.</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For more on Frank Lloyd Wright:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Lloyd Wright's LA Samuel-Novarro House for sale</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">When 'Frank Lloyd Wright' and 'historic designation' are holding back your home&rsquo;s value, what&rsquo;s a seller to do?</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New Jersey&rsquo;s Oldest and Largest Frank Lloyd Wright House Listed for $2.2M</a></li></ul> Back to basics: building primitive architecture using only primitive tools Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-12T13:33:00-04:00 >2016-10-13T23:46:19-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="383" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Of the countless DIY YouTube channels out there, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Primitive Technology</a> has to be one of the most impressive. Starring an unidentified Australian protagonist&mdash;known as "Prim" by some within the channel's millions of followers&mdash;the videos document our primitive hero&nbsp;building huts, spears, a forge, and all kinds of other tools for survival using only what he finds in the bush of Northern Queensland.</p><p>Perhaps one of the most impressive projects, for the labor, time and complexity involved, is the tiled roof hut, complete with in-floor heating and an oven.&nbsp;How's that for design/build?</p><p></p><p>Despite always appearing shirtless in his videos, Prim still has a t-shirt tan, backing up the channel's <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">origin story</a> as a free-time hobby within a dude's otherwise modern life (although he'd like to pursue it full-time). All of his videos have millions of views, presenting one kind of project each episode, with no narration or introduction&mdash;only occasional subtitles&mdash;making them remarkable pedagogical resources fo...</p> Driverless cars hit the streets of Milton Keynes Julia Ingalls 2016-10-11T20:49:00-04:00 >2016-10-11T20:49:30-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="203" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Driverless cars will trundle around the UK in their first public trials today. The demonstration of the autonomous electric vehicles is going to take place on the pavements of Milton Keynes. These tests will be the culmination of an 18-month research project which involved virtually mapping the town and updating regulations for driverless vehicles.</p></em><br /><br /><p>For the latest on advances in self-driving cars:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Uber lets you hail its self-driving cars in Pittsburgh later this month</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">How autonomous vehicles will accelerate suburban sprawl</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">This startup hopes to bring autonomous campus shuttles to colleges by 2017</a></li></ul> Help fund this Kickstarter for 3D printed maps of Tokyo Julia Ingalls 2016-10-11T13:39:00-04:00 >2016-10-13T23:55:44-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="444" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The confluence of Google mapping, 3D printing and the desire for inventive home decor has produced a&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Kickstarter</a> for One Hundred Tokyo, a fully-fledged three dimensional map of Tokyo that is divided into 100 handy pieces. Pick your favorite palm-sized square(s) or collect all 100; it's up to you and your available display space. Nonetheless, these minutely detailed urban segments are cool/notable both for their immediacy and their accuracy; Zenrin, the same urban data providers that work with Google Maps and Microsoft, have "specially equipped vehicles" that compile the metropolitan deets used to produce the models.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>What else is going on with 3D printing? So glad you asked:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"Curve Appeal" will be globe's first Freeform 3D printed house</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Earth's first 3D printed office created in 17 days for half the labor cost</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Recreation of Palmyra's Arch of Triumph presented in Trafalgar Square</a></li></ul> This week's picks for London architecture and design events Abigail Banfield 2016-10-10T14:11:00-04:00 >2016-10-13T23:48:52-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="390" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>This week is one of the first in&nbsp;the&nbsp;season to demand a coat. With nights starting to draw in, the temperature dropping, and with many galleries and events opening later in the evenings, now is the perfect time to replace parks with free exhibitions. This year&rsquo;s <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Stirling Prize winning project</a> is one such gallery to visit on a cold, windy October day.</p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Check back regularly</a>&nbsp;to keep up to date with&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">London</a>'s latest happenings and our weekly recommendations!</p><p><strong><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bj&ouml;rk Digital | Open now until 23 October</a></strong></p><p><img alt="" src=""></p><p><em>Image: Somerset House</em></p><p>For fans of both Bj&ouml;rk and Virtual Reality technology, this exhibition hits all the right notes. Somerset house is hosting the European premiere of this unique and experiential showcase; a collaboration from leading visual artists and programmers and iconic performer, Bj&ouml;rk. The latest VR software and techniques are used to create a more personal, &lsquo;futuristic&rsquo; experience of an exclusive&nbsp;performance by the Icelandic singer at the Royal Albert Hall.</p><p><strong><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hyundai Commission: Philippe ...</a></strong></p> Quickly Recover from Missing Billable Hours and Miscalculated Project Costs Sponsor 2016-10-10T09:00:00-04:00 >2016-10-11T22:08:40-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img title="" alt="" src=""></a><em><strong>This post is brought to you by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BQE ArchiOffice</a>.</strong></em><br>&nbsp;<p><strong><em>Learn how this Brisbane-based architectural firm is enjoying faster cash flow now.</em></strong></p><p><strong>About</strong></p><p>Based in West End, Brisbane, Tim Bennetton Architects is a small, private architectural firm with a single director and three employees. They work in an intimate, responsive environment that collectively values good design, simplicity and positive relationships. This Australian firm goes above and beyond for their clients to ensure that the joy remains through the ups and downs of their projects &ndash; from the initial meeting through to completion. Tim Bennetton and his team offer unparalleled service that provides excellent design, as well as an experience in transforming that vision into reality.</p><p><strong>Background</strong></p><p>Prior to finding the right software for their firm, Tim Bennetton Architects encountered many time tracking issues that made it difficult to estimate project costs and profits. &ldquo;We used something called Timesheet Professional, which tracked our times ...</p> The story behind Didi, China's "Uber Slayer" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-06T18:41:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T23:03:27-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="866" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In August, after a multibillion-dollar, year-and-a-half-long battle, Uber agreed to sell its business in China and depart the country. It was a face-saving retreat for Uber, which got a 17.7 percent ownership stake in Didi and $1 billion in cash. [...] Investors recently valued Didi at $35&nbsp;billion, making it one of the most valuable private companies in the world. Uber, with operations in almost 500&nbsp;cities on six continents, is worth $68&nbsp;billion.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More stories from the Uber-verse:</p><ul><li><a title='The view from inside a self-driving Uber: "the technology is not quite ready"' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The view from inside a self-driving Uber: "the technology is not quite ready"</a></li><li><a title="Uber and the future of on-demand public transit" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Uber and the future of on-demand public transit</a></li><li><a title="Google, Uber, Lyft, Ford and Volvo join forces to lobby for autonomous vehicles" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Google, Uber, Lyft, Ford and Volvo join forces to lobby for autonomous vehicles</a></li><li><a title="Women-only Uber alternatives face pushback from antidiscrimination laws" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Women-only Uber alternatives face pushback from antidiscrimination laws</a></li><li><a title="Paris erupts in riot as taxi drivers protest Uber" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Paris erupts in riot as taxi drivers protest Uber</a></li></ul> OMA's plans for Axel Springer building officially released Julia Ingalls 2016-10-06T13:20:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T23:03:48-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="459" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>OMA's Axel Springer building, which received the official launch from its namesake company today, visually confronts the disparate nature of modern office work. The 30-foot tall atrium with 3D facade elements creates a stage for unscripted interaction, while the more discreet sections of the building provide focused, quiet working space for 3,500 employees. The building will also feature a publicly-accessible park on its top.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>As Rem Koolhaas noted, &ldquo;Over the years, Berlin has been a profound source of inspiration, and with Axel Springer we are thrilled to continue our long engagement with this city.<br>We are lucky to have a client who views architecture as an instrument of change, and with this building, we hope to address a central dilemma of the contemporary office: as computer-based work has become largely intangible and silent, how can people effectively<br>communicate in a workspace which fosters both concentration and vigorous interaction?&rdquo;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For more on the Axel Springer building:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">OMA wi...</a></li></ul> "Our architecture works harder than your architecture": Inside the city of Arcosanti Julia Ingalls 2016-10-06T13:03:00-04:00 >2016-10-15T09:14:30-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="430" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Can cities be built not only to be harmonious with their environment, but to outperform traditional architecture? The residents of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Arcosanti, Arizona</a>, which is profiled in this video excerpt from the Atlantic,&nbsp;seem to think so. Part campus, part permanent dwelling, Arcosanti embraces the concept of "arcology," or the blending of ecology and architecture, to create a holistic, tightly engineered mini-metropolis:</p><p><br><em>The City of the Future</em></p> UCL unleashes an autonomous, roving 'garden sphere' for London Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-05T13:25:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T00:29:48-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="365" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Therefore, our general theme and approach in this set of projects is that plants should become part of our society as well as self-reliant, and be given the ability to autonomously interact and walk with us. [...] The prototype is seen as a larger scale architectural improvement. With the reduction of gardens as years pass on, the design represents a depleted Earth as it is regenerating and given new life.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Watch the making of the "garden sphere", Hortum Machina, B below:</p><p></p><p>First unveiled in April of this year, the Hortum Machina, B project is designed by architects William Victor Camilleri and Danilo Sampaio at the UCL's&nbsp;Bartlett. Covered in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">GCR</a>, the "autonomy" is derived from the plants inside the sphere: "although flora lack nervous systems 'they can, much like animals, become electro-chemically stimulated by (their) environment'.</p><p>The designers have wired these botanical reflexes into the control-loop of the sphere&rsquo;s 'autonomous robotic ecosystem', thereby allowing for autonomous travel. In fact, the plants are able to move the exoskeleton 'collectively and democratically'."</p><p>Related on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">UCL researchers present a new kind of self-cleaning nano-engineered window</a></li><li><a title="Forget ball pits &ndash;&nbsp;Amazon is growing over 3,000 plant species to fill its new downtown Seattle HQ" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Forget ball pits &ndash;&nbsp;Amazon is growing over 3,000 plant species to fill its new downtown Seattle HQ</a></li><li><a title="Ten Top Images on Archinect's &quot;Biophilia&quot; Pinterest Board" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Ten Top Images on Archinect's "Biophilia" Pinterest Board</a></li><li><a title="Problem Plants - Weeds in Ecology, Art and Culture" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Problem Plants - Weeds in Ecology, Art and Culture</a></li></ul> Strelka Institute announces enrollment campaign for postgraduate education programme Sponsor 2016-10-04T14:40:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T00:20:31-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="341" border="0" title="" alt="" /><a href=";utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=1004&amp;utm_campaign=thenewnormal" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img title="" alt="" src=""></a><em><strong>This post is brought to you by <a href=";utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=1004&amp;utm_campaign=thenewnormal" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Strelka Institute</a>.</strong></em><br>&nbsp;<p><em>During the new academic year Strelka students will answer the question: &lsquo;What has become &ldquo;The New Normal&rdquo; in the modern world?&rsquo;</em></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Strelka Institute</a> for architecture, media and design launched <a href=";utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=1004&amp;utm_campaign=thenewnormal" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">the enrollment campaign</a> for the postgraduate education program. The theme of the 7th academic year at Strelka is The New Normal.</p><p>Research will focus on the new contemporary condition, which has emerged because of the rapid development of technology &mdash; including machine intelligence, biotechnology, automation, alternative spaces created in VR and AR &mdash; and define new paths for urban design and development.</p><p><strong>The New Normal is:</strong></p><ul><li>30 international students from Russia and abroad</li><li>monthly stipend of $600</li><li>5 months from February 2017 to July 2017</li><li>for experts in media, architecture, design, urbanism, creative industries (artists, scenarists, writers, filmakers), and other fields like software studies, digital media, social sciences</li><li>in English</li></ul><p>Students will learn the met...</p> IN(3D)USTRY - The Show Sponsor 2016-09-29T03:00:00-04:00 >2016-09-29T12:09:00-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="433" border="0" title="" alt="" /><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img alt="" src=""></a><em><strong>This post is brought to you by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">IN(3D)USTRY From Needs to Solutions</a>.</strong></em><br>&nbsp;<p>The first edition of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">IN(3D)USTRY From Needs to Solutions</a>, which took place from June 21st to June 23rd 2016 at Fira de Barcelona, successfully introduced an entirely new concept for exploring the possibilities offered by additive manufacturing and 3D printing across four key industrial sectors.</p><p>The event showcased both the present of additive manufacturing, as well as its promising future, by focusing on the challenges 3D printing presents, and offering innovative, pioneering, and state-of-the-art solutions to manufacturers&rsquo; specific needs.</p><p>Over the three-day event, prominent international speakers took to the stage to describe their experiences with additive manufacturing in the four most important vertical sectors: Aerospace &amp; Automotive, Healthcare, Architecture &amp; Habitat, and Consumer &amp; Retail Goods.</p><p>This unique approach stimulated participants to explore the many different solutions already offered by additive man...</p> Apple plan to open a huge campus in London’s Battersea Power Station Ellen Hancock 2016-09-28T12:31:00-04:00 >2016-10-07T01:11:27-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="421" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Apple will open a mega-campus inside London&rsquo;s Battersea Power Station in a major boon for the developers behind the Grade II-listed building&rsquo;s regeneration. The tech giant will take over 500,000 sq ft of the power station&rsquo;s Boiler House, spanning six floors. Around 1,4000 staff are expected to move into the Apple campus in 2021.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Take a look back at Archinect's coverage of the Battersea Power Station development:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">First images of BIG&rsquo;s Malaysia Square in London&rsquo;s Battersea Power Station</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BIG appointed to design public square for revamped Battersea Power Station</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Frank Gehry about his Battersea Power Station project, Norman Foster, Mark Zuckerberg</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Architects imagine a Battersea Power Station rollercoaster conversion</a></li></ul> Efficiency-enhancing drones could dramatically reduce construction costs Julia Ingalls 2016-09-27T13:32:00-04:00 >2016-10-07T01:07:11-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="366" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>According to this&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Fortune</a> article, it's estimated that the construction industry wastes billions of dollars annually in poorly organized and distributed materials, a practice that could be eliminated with omnipresent flying drones. The trick is to create software that can process what the drones see on each construction site into data that humans can quickly comprehend and efficiently implement. Autodesk is investing in developing software and hardware that can convey this information, which may dramatically cut construction costs (and perhaps make <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">architects rethink how they bill for projects</a>).</p><p>For more on drones:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Designing for drones: a condo tower with drone-friendly balconies</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">This drone video takes you on a fascinating flight through the guts of Seattle's Bertha tunneling machine</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Here comes the "dronescraper"</a></li></ul> LED streetlights may contribute to 'serious health conditions' says AMA, prompting cities to re-evaluate Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-09-26T13:16:00-04:00 >2016-10-04T12:03:49-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="494" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>high-intensity LED streetlights ... emit unseen blue light that can disturb sleep rhythms and possibly increase the risk of serious health conditions, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. [...] Some [researchers] noted that exposure to the blue-rich LED outdoor lights might decrease people&rsquo;s secretion of the hormone melatonin. Secreted at night, melatonin helps balance the reproductive, thyroid and adrenal hormones and regulates the body&rsquo;s circadian rhythm of sleeping and waking.</p></em><br /><br /><p>While the American Medical Association cautions cities to re-evaluate their use of high-intensity LED lights for health reasons, others have pointed out that most televisions and computers also emit the blue light wavelength found to be potentially harmful. Aside from human health concerns, LEDs are also "a major contributor" to anthropogenic light pollution in the night sky.</p><p>Related on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a title="This atlas shows how much light pollution has infiltrated night skies worldwide" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">This atlas shows how much light pollution has infiltrated night skies worldwide</a></li><li><a title="Not-So-Bright Lights, Big City" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Not-So-Bright Lights, Big City</a></li><li><a title="LEDs to be installed in the Sistine Chapel" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LEDs to be installed in the Sistine Chapel</a></li><li><a title="Scientists Develop Technique to Improve Flexible, Conductive, Transparent Glass" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Scientists Develop Technique to Improve Flexible, Conductive, Transparent Glass</a></li></ul> Introducing Bjarke Ingels' floating student housing, "Urban Rigger" Julia Ingalls 2016-09-22T12:48:00-04:00 >2016-10-17T17:04:23-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="443" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Bjarke Ingels has found the elusive silver lining in global sea level rise and the European affordable housing crisis in the form of "Urban Rigger," a series of inexpensive student housing complexes that are designed to float in the sea, especially in those cities which have dense urban cores next to the waterfront. The idea here is to provide students with affordable digs that are close to class while simultaneously making the most out of changing climate conditions and post-industrial port repurposing. The first complete Urban Rigger has already been assembled in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Copenhagen</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>According to an article in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">FastCompany</a>, "Each unit, which can house 12 students at once, is composed of modular shipping containers. These modules are powered by a photovoltaic array and use a heat-exchange system that draws upon the thermal mass of water to warm and cool the interiors. Meanwhile, an aerogel developed by NASA insulates the interiors."</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For the latest on Bjarke Ingels:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Play "Arkinoid" arcade on BIG...</a></li></ul> Meet Ernst Neufert, father of building standards Orhan Ayyüce 2016-09-20T17:32:00-04:00 >2016-09-22T23:30:20-04:00 <img src="" width="600" height="529" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Almost every kitchen counter in the United States is 36 inches tall. And 25 inches deep. Eighteen inches above the counters are the cabinets, which are 16 inches deep. Where do these sizes and dimensions come from? Have they always been so exact?</p></em><br /><br /><p>"In 1938 Hitler&rsquo;s chief architect Albert Speer hired Neufert to, as Speer put it, &ldquo;oversee the standardization of building parts, and the rationalization to building methods.&rdquo; He got to lead his own team of designers and technicians. They were called The Neufert Department.</p><p>He created the Octametric Brick, a standard-sized masonry unit that would come to replace any other sized brick in Germany (the bricks were 12.5 centimeters wide, or one-eighth of a meter, hence its name). Adoption of the brick, as Neufert saw, would create a standardized, modular world that all construction would occur in&mdash;no more custom shapes or sizes within buildings, no more worrying that cabinets would be the same height as the stove.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>With the Octametric Brick, buildings could still look different and be different sizes, but everything, when reduced to its smallest part, would have this as a base unit. This overarching uniformity, based around the dimensions of a single brick, would be called the Octametric Sy...</p> Multi-layered cube-like façade achieves diversity in residential high-rise design with fire-rated aluminum composite material Sponsor 2016-09-18T09:00:00-04:00 >2016-09-19T00:28:59-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="974" border="0" title="" alt="" /><a href=";utm_medium=Editorial&amp;utm_campaign=September2016" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img alt="" src=""></a><em><strong>This post is brought to you by <a href=";utm_medium=Editorial&amp;utm_campaign=September2016" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Alucobond&reg;</a></strong></em><br>&nbsp;<p>A big compliment to architects is hearing that one of their building designs has become a recognizable landmark. That&rsquo;s the case for architects at the Los Angeles office of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>Arquitectonica</strong></a> International Corp. who designed the Olume residential building in San Francisco&rsquo;s Mission District with a unique multi-layered cube-like metal fa&ccedil;ade featuring a total of five custom earth-toned colors of <a href=";utm_medium=Editorial&amp;utm_campaign=September2016" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>Alucobond&reg; Plus</strong></a> aluminum composite material (ACM).</p><p>The 12-story 138,512-square- foot Olume multifamily residential community opened in March 2016 with owner Monogram Residential Trust, Inc., of Plano, Texas, offering 121 luxury rental units &ndash; including studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom apartments &ndash; as well as two levels of subterranean parking. Monogram Residential Trust partnered with Martin Building Co., of San Francisco, to develop the boutique-style community.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Arquitectonica was brought in to re-design the fa&ccedil;ade of the building after the project&rsquo;s en...</p> The view from inside a self-driving Uber: "the technology is not quite ready" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-09-15T13:06:00-04:00 >2016-09-18T22:35:45-04:00 <img src="" width="600" height="337" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>During my ride, along a few miles of road near Uber&rsquo;s testing facility in an old industrial neighborhood, the car performed admirably in many difficult situations...and I mostly felt pretty safe. However, several times the person behind the wheel needed to take control [...] it will take time for Uber and others to perfect fully automated driving. In fact, it remains unclear what needs to be done before it can be considered safe to remove humans from the driver&rsquo;s seat.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More on Uber and autonomous vehicles:</p><ul><li><a title="Japan gunning for Tokyo to take on driverless vehicles by 2020 Olympic Games" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Japan gunning for Tokyo to take on driverless vehicles by 2020 Olympic Games</a></li><li><a title="Tesla Model S driver suffers fatal crash while using autopilot, in first known death involving an autonomous vehicle" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Tesla Model S driver suffers fatal crash while using autopilot, in first known death involving an autonomous vehicle</a></li><li><a title="Google, Uber, Lyft, Ford and Volvo join forces to lobby for autonomous vehicles" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Google, Uber, Lyft, Ford and Volvo join forces to lobby for autonomous vehicles</a></li><li><a title="Beverly Hills wants to provide driverless cars as public transit" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Beverly Hills wants to provide driverless cars as public transit</a></li><li><a title='"In LiDAR We Trust" &ndash; Poking the subconscious of autonomous vehicles with special guest Geoff Manaugh, on Archinect Sessions #43' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"In LiDAR We Trust" &ndash; Poking the subconscious of autonomous vehicles with special guest Geoff Manaugh, on Archinect Sessions #43</a></li></ul> Play "Arkinoid" arcade on BIG's website Julia Ingalls 2016-09-15T12:54:00-04:00 >2016-09-18T22:36:12-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="326" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In a throwback to arcade games, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bjarke Ingels</a>' firm BIG has created an Arkanoid version of their <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">website called Arkinoid</a>, where you can earn points by hitting the firm's projects with a black paddle ball:</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Don't think it will be easy to claim the top score, however: "Ben Devine!" is currently in the lead with 9223372036854775807 points, making one wonder about his <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">employment status</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For more on architecturally-related games:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Kids play with virtual skyscrapers in new app</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A tour of experiential magical realism games from the Triennale Game Collection</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Better than SimCity: how architects benefit from games, ft. special guest Quilian Riano on Archinect Sessions #79</a></li></ul> Japan gunning for Tokyo to take on driverless vehicles by 2020 Olympic Games Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-09-13T13:12:00-04:00 >2016-09-17T00:37:05-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="488" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Tokyo-based Dynamic Map Planning will undertake the task of mapping out roadways in the highest detail to date (featuring such useful insights as curb location, lane height, and limits on turning), intended to be 20 times as precise as current maps [...] The company will also lead the effort to equip Tokyo with digital infrastructure that will allow self-driving vehicles to pick up on factors that can change or appear in their surroundings as often as every few minutes or even seconds</p></em><br /><br /><p>More autonomous driving news from around the world:</p><ul><li><a title="Airbus promises autonomous flying taxis in the (very) near future" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Airbus promises autonomous flying taxis in the (very) near future</a></li><li><a title="Tesla Model S driver suffers fatal crash while using autopilot, in first known death involving an autonomous vehicle" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Tesla Model S driver suffers fatal crash while using autopilot, in first known death involving an autonomous vehicle</a></li><li><a title="Would self-driving cars be useful to people living outside urban cores?" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Would self-driving cars be useful to people living outside urban cores?</a></li><li><a title="Germany's railway sees future in harmony with driverless cars" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Germany's railway sees future in harmony with driverless cars</a></li><li><a title="Google, Uber, Lyft, Ford and Volvo join forces to lobby for autonomous vehicles" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Google, Uber, Lyft, Ford and Volvo join forces to lobby for autonomous vehicles</a></li></ul> Brain Space: One-to-One #37 with Michael Arbib, former vice president of the Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-09-12T17:37:00-04:00 >2016-09-16T00:02:08-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="421" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>For nearly 30 years, Michael Arbib taught computer science, neuroscience, engineering, psychology, and mathematics at the University of Southern California, and is known for his prolific work on brains and computers: essentially, what the mechanisms of one can teach us about how the other works. Gathering together all aspects of his work, he&rsquo;s sharpened his focus on the connection between architecture and neuroscience, and developed the concept of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">neuromorphic architecture</a>.</p><p>He is now associated with the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">NewSchool for Architecture and Design</a> and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">UC San Diego</a>, and has played a major role in the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture</a>, based in La Jolla, California. We spoke about the Academy&rsquo;s <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">upcoming conference</a>, and what architecture practice can realistically take from neuroscientific research.</p><p>Listen to&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">One-to-One</a>&nbsp;#37 with&nbsp;<strong>Michael Arbib</strong>:</p><ul><li><strong>iTunes</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Click here to listen&nbsp;and subscribe to the new&nbsp;"Archinect Sessions One-to-One" podcast</a></li><li><strong>SoundCloud</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">click here to follow Archinect</a></li><li><strong>RSS</strong>: subscri...</li></ul> Financial Management for the Small Architectural Firm 101 Sponsor 2016-09-12T08:00:00-04:00 >2016-09-14T23:12:30-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><img title="" alt="" src=""></a><em><strong>This post is brought to you by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BQE ArchiOffice</a>.</strong></em><br>&nbsp;<p>Providing great architectural services and running a financially successful firm are not mutually exclusive. It&rsquo;s quite the contrary. If you are as good an architect as you think, you&rsquo;ll be successful and it won&rsquo;t be because of your design skills. However, what separates the great&ndash;struggling designers from the great-successful designers isn&rsquo;t just luck.</p><p>It&rsquo;s not your fault that after all the years of education and training you endured to become an architect, you don&rsquo;t know the first thing about how to run a business. Sure, you can design &ndash; like nobody&rsquo;s business &ndash; but do you truly understand the difference between income and revenue? How about a credit and debit? Do you know what an overhead factor is and why it&rsquo;s so critical? Do you know what your minimum billing rate is? Did you ever sit down and map out your firm&rsquo;s operating budget?</p><p>Chances are the answer to all these questions is no. So let&rsquo;s get to work and get you on the right trac...</p>