Archinect - News 2016-10-21T12:51:39-04:00 Tom Wiscombe redesigns the L.A. billboard (and is chosen over Zaha Hadid's proposal) Julia Ingalls 2016-10-20T12:39:00-04:00 >2016-10-20T19:54:03-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="379" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Although Los Angeles has had its battles over <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">supergraphics</a>&mdash;those painted on advertisements that often stretch multiple stories on a building's facade&mdash;the billboard as a concept has received substantially less attention, unless the provocative imagery on it causes fender benders. However, Tom Wiscombe's proposal for digital, vertically aligned, two-sided billboards that allow people to walk inside of them injects new life into an otherwise sleepy structure, making them less car-centric and more about public space.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The proposed billboards, which were chosen via a West Hollywood RFP over designs submitted by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Zaha Hadid</a>, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gensler</a>, and the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MAK Center</a>, will be placed in public plazas along West Hollywood's section of Sunset Boulevard.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For more on Tom Wiscombe:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A Liberal Education: Tom Wiscombe on Archinect Sessions One-to-One #14</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Take a peek at Tom Wiscombe's "underground" Old Bank District Museum scheme for L.A.</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Moscow New NCCA Entry by Tom Wiscombe Design</a></li></ul> British construction criticised for lack of innovation by government report Ellen Hancock 2016-10-20T11:47:00-04:00 >2016-10-20T11:47:23-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The review highlights the sector&rsquo;s dysfunctional training model, its lack of innovation and collaboration, and its non-existent research and development culture. Low productivity continues to hamper the sector, while recent high levels of cost inflation, driven by a shortage of workers, has stalled numerous housing schemes as they have become too expensive to build.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Read more UK industry news here:&nbsp;</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mayor of London launches probe into the impact of foreign investment in city's real estate</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Engineering giant Arup announces imminent layoffs following Brexit vote</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The former-football stars tackling England's affordable housing shortage</a></li></ul> NYC breaks ground on One Vanderbilt, its second tallest tower DianePham 2016-10-19T11:41:00-04:00 >2016-10-19T12:47:42-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Designed by the tall tower pros at Kohn Pedersen Fox Architects, One Vanderbilt will rise to become the second tallest tower in NYC and the tallest tower in Midtown. However, unlike the city&rsquo;s other skyscraper additions noted for their slim silhouettes, this tower will be a behemoth occupying a full block between Vanderbilt and Madison avenues and East 42nd and East 43rd streets; the site is also directly adjacent to Grand Central Terminal.</p></em><br /><br /><p>On Tuesday morning, developer SL Green held an official groundbreaking ceremony for the KPF-designed One Vanderbilt.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The tower, which will rise&nbsp;1,401 feet when completed in 2020, will be New York City's second tallest, and one of its largest with more than 1.6 million square feet of office space distributed across 58 stories.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>One Vanderbilt will also occupy an entire city block,&nbsp;bound by Vanderbilt and Madison avenues and East 42nd and East 43rd streets. Notably, the site is directly adjacent to Grand Central Terminal.</p> Javier Senosiain's low-income "bio-architecture" housing proposal Julia Ingalls 2016-10-18T14:26:00-04:00 >2016-10-18T15:24:37-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="261" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Forming a closer, more harmonious bond between humanity and nature is the underlying goal of Javier Senosiain's organic or so-called "bio-architecture." His buildings often take the shape of organic forms--in one case, mythic serpent Quetzalcoatl--while simultaneously harvesting rainwater and providing natural shade and ventilation, among other attributes. The Mexican architect and professor at <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">UNAM</a> has a retrospective exhibition at The Palace of Fine Arts in Mexico City displaying his buildings, including a proposed low-income housing complex which breaks away from the cram'em'in monolithic housing milleu and instead creates a walkable, livable village. Check out this <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">CCTV-America</a> video profiling Senosiain and his work:</p> Can Cleveland combat climate change with compact communities? Julia Ingalls 2016-10-18T12:54:00-04:00 >2016-10-18T12:54:49-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="314" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Although Cleveland often serves more as a punchline than a solution (the Cuyahoga River caught fire in 1969 due to pollution), a climate change conference convened by the United Nations and currently being held in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Quito</a>, Ecuador sees new potential in the city. As <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">StreetsBlog</a> reports, if Cleveland can transform its current suburbia into denser neighborhoods, the metropolis could serve as a model for numerous water and climate-challenged cities in how to adapt to the demands of an increasingly populated globe. As a paper entitled "Where to put the next billion people" states:</p><p>"Cleveland could play a significant role in the fight against climate change by developing a strategy for more compact communities and with a more open and encouraging immigration policy, the report concludes.</p><p>The influx of immigrants should probably be planned better.</p><p>Cleveland&rsquo;s outer suburbs and nearby rural towns hold the key. If the suburbs can figure out strategies to retrofit themselves as dense, walkable com...</p> MONU #25 looks at Independent Urbanism MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2016-10-17T12:28:00-04:00 >2016-10-21T01:19:05-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="692" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A city in a country that recently gained independence is likely to undergo processes of radical transformation and massive restructuring and re-imagining that are not only societal, political, and economic in nature, but can also impact the planning system of a city and influence its built-up environment.</p></em><br /><br /><p>A city in a country that recently gained independence is likely to undergo processes of radical transformation and massive restructuring and re-imagining that are not only societal, political, and economic in nature, but can also impact the planning system of a city and influence its built-up environment. <em> <strong>Jasna Mariotti</strong></em> makes this quite clear in her contribution to<strong> MONU</strong>, entitled <strong>"What Ever Happened to Skopje?"</strong>. This new issue of our magazine deals with various phenomena impacting cities of countries that became newly<em><strong> independent</strong></em> which we call <strong>"Independent Urbanism"</strong>. She shows how the centre of Skopje in Macedonia has been remodeled according to an image of the city that never existed as such. Obviously, many<em><strong> "independent" cities</strong></em> are facing major struggles and difficulties in finding their new identity that usually have a lot to do with the fact that the<em> "birth of a country"</em> is a contested process often involving political turmoil, institutional instability, and economic turbulence...</p> Landmarks reveals new renderings for Studio Gang's Natural History Museum expansion project Alyssa Alimurung 2016-10-12T11:23:00-04:00 >2016-10-14T00:06:42-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="241" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In light of the Landmarks Preservation Commission's approval of Jeanne Gang's expansion plan for the American Museum of Natural History, the Commission has revealed a slew of new renderings, which show the $325 million project from various angles, as well as new views of the surrounding parkland. Chairwoman Meenakshi Srinivasan referred to the new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education and Innovation as a &ldquo;stunning piece of architecture&rdquo; and an &ldquo;absolutely wonderful addition.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> The absorbing design of China's anti-flood "sponge cities" Julia Ingalls 2016-10-11T13:08:00-04:00 >2016-10-13T23:55:31-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="384" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Is flood mitigation the new frontier in urban planning?&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">China</a>, whose urban centers have regularly been experiencing infrastructure-shuttering floods, is actively encouraging its metropolises to start reshaping themselves to handle the new reality via the so-called "sponge city" program. As an article in<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">&nbsp;The Guardian</a> notes:</p><p><em>The sponge city programme takes inspiration from low impact development in the US, water sensitive urban design in Australia and sustainable drainage systems in the UK.&nbsp;</em></p><p><em>But nothing at this scale has ever been attempted before. &ldquo;The sponge city programme is more comprehensive and ambitious,&rdquo; says WenMei Ha, head of the China water management team at Arcadis, an international urban consultancy which was appointed to this plan by the government.</em></p><p>For more on flood mitigation and the entities trying to rise above it:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Come rain or shine: reviving collective urban form with the GSD's Office for Urbanization</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Designing around sea-level rise in New York</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">At home in a changing cli...</a></li></ul> "Our architecture works harder than your architecture": Inside the city of Arcosanti Julia Ingalls 2016-10-06T13:03:00-04:00 >2016-10-15T09:14:30-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="340" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Can cities be built not only to be harmonious with their environment, but to outperform traditional architecture? The residents of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Arcosanti, Arizona</a>, which is profiled in this video excerpt from the Atlantic,&nbsp;seem to think so. Part campus, part permanent dwelling, Arcosanti embraces the concept of "arcology," or the blending of ecology and architecture, to create a holistic, tightly engineered mini-metropolis:</p><p><br><em>The City of the Future</em></p> ‘We are building our way to hell’: tales of gentrification around the world Orhan Ayyüce 2016-10-05T19:23:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T21:18:46-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>My issue is not with areas being improved, it is how gentrification is about one demographic of our society changing an area for themselves and not for the benefit of everyone.</p></em><br /><br /><p><strong>Portland, US: &lsquo;We are currently building our way to hell&rsquo;</strong></p><p>&ldquo;I am a 70 year old carpenter and I have seen more decay in the quality of life in the last three years in&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Portland</a>, Oregon &ndash; pearl of culture in the Great Northwest &ndash; with the one-term mayor &lsquo;Chainsaw Charlie Hales&rsquo; who was previously a lobbyist for the the &lsquo;home builders&rsquo; &ndash; read developers. Towers built into the sky on alluvial soil &ndash; the stuff that turns to pudding in an earthquake. Hundred-year-old classic neighbourhoods injected with &lsquo;cereal box&rsquo; buildings invalidating residents&rsquo; privacy and daylight.</p><p>From my perspective, I would call this a travesty: &lsquo;Bankers gone wild&rsquo;. A spreadsheet vision of creating investments that spread the risk, with total disregard for community culture which, prior to this, was well protected by zoning. The people here have a campaign called&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Stop demolishing Portland</a>. Such beauty is being replaced by such tastelessness, as though the reason the people want to live here is to be housed like gerbi...</p> Pave paradise? American cities are rethinking parking spaces Nicholas Korody 2016-10-03T18:28:00-04:00 >2016-10-09T23:40:11-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="333" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The US has long been the world leader in building parking spaces. During the mid 20th century, city zoning codes began to include requirements and quotas for most developments to include parking spaces. The supply skyrocketed. A 2011 study by the University of California, estimated there are upwards of 800m parking spaces in the US, covering about 25,000 square miles of land.</p></em><br /><br /><p><em>Increasingly, cities are rethinking this approach. As cities across the world begin to prioritise walkable urban development and the type of city living that does not require a car for every trip, city officials are beginning to move away from blanket policies of providing abundant parking.</em></p><p>For more on pedestrian-friendly initiatives, follow these links:</p><ul><li><a href="" target="_blank">When walkability goes up, so do home prices</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">Taking a break from cars in automobile-centric Manhattan</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">Jan Gehl: "Never ask what the city can do for your building, always ask what your building can do for the city."</a></li></ul> Editor's Picks #455 Nam Henderson 2016-10-03T09:09:00-04:00 >2016-10-03T13:46:36-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Amelia Taylor-Hochberg</a> featured <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Orhan Ayy&uuml;ce</a>&rsquo;s&nbsp;interview with "The Wire" actor Bob Wisdom from <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LA Forum's summer issue, in Screen/Print #45</a>.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Therein, the two spoke of the show&rsquo;s depiction of race and crime in American cities, as well as the actor&rsquo;s own observations on east vs. west coast urbanisms.</p><p>Plus, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Julia Ingalls</a> reviewed &lsquo;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Eero Saarinen: The Architect Who Saw the Future</a>&rsquo; an "<em>intimate, luscious documentary portrait of Eero Saarinen</em>".&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Donna Sink</a> was a&nbsp;bit surprisingly, "<em>Feeling, very very conflicted about this entire article and film, but I do very much want to see it. That said, Eliel is my favorite Saarinen. With great &nbsp;respect to Eero's incredible body of work, I just prefer Eliel's focus on craft.</em>"</p><p><br><strong>News</strong><br>MoMA's chief curator of architecture and design, Martino Stierli, was on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">One-to-One #38</a>.&nbsp;<strong>LiMX</strong> was not impressed "<em>nothing he is saying is particularly interesting or doesn't sound half-hearted corporate speak. Generally zzzzzzz. Amelia seems more up on arch curation than he...Berg...</em></p> An ambitious plan to overhaul Penn Station, by moving Madison Square Garden Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-09-30T13:21:00-04:00 >2016-10-09T17:19:40-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="398" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Penn Station is much more than a transportation center. As the heart of the Northeast Corridor rail system, it has the potential to link downtown to downtown along the Eastern Seaboard in a way far more economical, expedient and environmentally sustainable than air travel. But while the governor&rsquo;s recently announced plan is a step toward this goal, more must be done. What we propose in addition is a completely new commuter station on the site of Madison Square Garden</p></em><br /><br /><p>The proposed plan for Penn Station's redesign comes by way of&nbsp;Vishaan Chakrabarti, founder of the&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Practice for Architecture and Urbanism</a>.&nbsp;Previously, Chakrabarti was&nbsp;the director of Manhattan's Department of City Planning under former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, where he also oversaw prior refurbishment plans for the station.</p><p>Previously, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo had released a plan to bring Penn Station up to speed (it was designed for a third of its current 650,000 daily commuters). But while the Governor's plan, headed by SOM, is focused mostly on utility, Chakrabarti's plan (as he writes for&nbsp;<em>The Times</em>) aims to provide the city with a grand public space&mdash;by physically relocating Madison Square Garden (an idea that has been floated <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">before</a>) to honor the original station's legacy where travelers <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"entered the city like a god"</a>.</p><p>Related on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a title="Governor Cuomo Announces New Penn Station Private-Public Partnership RFP" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Governor Cuomo Announces New Penn Station Private-Public Partnership RFP</a></li><li><a title="Selective memory: Old Penn Station, ruined before it was ruined" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Selective memory: Old Penn Station, ruined before it ...</a></li></ul> Public art: I Am From St. Johns Gary Garvin 2016-09-29T19:05:00-04:00 >2016-09-29T19:37:49-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="425" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Spiro Kostof, concluding his history, tells us we need "to come to terms with our past and to take shelter and find pride in the continuities of time and place. This is not alone a professional imperative. All of us&mdash;architects and users, environmental policymakers and consumers of such policies&mdash;need to become engaged."&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>This&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">link</a>&nbsp;takes you to the full text of a public artwork in the St. Johns neighborhood of Portland, Oregon. Sharon's words not only provide a link to the past, publicly on view, but also tap a vital democratic spirit, of special relevance this election season.</p> Needle exchange: a look at Herzog & de Meuron's transformative "needle" tower development in DTLA's arts district Julia Ingalls 2016-09-29T12:56:00-04:00 >2016-10-02T21:24:12-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="496" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The name of Herzog and de Meuron's proposed new development for downtown Los Angeles' <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">arts district</a>, 6 AM, seems like an hour/mindset that most of its current residents experience only because they stayed up much too late. But no one can stop the dawn of high-concept gentrification from breaking all over the district of former abandoned warehouses, especially when that concept promises to embody the so-called "DNA"of Los Angeles.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>According to an <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">article by Frances Anderton</a>, de Meuron purposefully nixed medium height buildings from 6 AM's design in favor of nose-bleed high rises and squat, table-like mixed-use structures, as this was reflective of how he views Los Angeles:</p><p>&ldquo;The high rise for us is important to make a difference between the low and the high because I think this is a part of specificity of Los Angeles.&nbsp;It&rsquo;s either flat or it&rsquo;s high. You don&rsquo;t have in between&nbsp;bulky&nbsp;buildings. So (we&rsquo;d) rather do extremely low and then you go higher. (The towers are)&nbsp;needle like &mdash; it shows...</p> Obama calls for zoning overhaul, blames existing laws for rising inequality and unaffordable rents Nicholas Korody 2016-09-27T18:35:00-04:00 >2016-09-29T21:27:49-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Obama administration Monday is calling on cities and counties to rethink their zoning laws, saying that antiquated rules on construction, housing and land use are contributing to high rents and income inequality, and dragging down the U.S. economy as a whole [...] The White House published a &ldquo;toolkit&rdquo; of economic evidence and policy fixes to help local political leaders fight back against the NIMBYs that tend to hold sway over municipal zoning meetings.</p></em><br /><br /><p>In related news:</p><ul><li><a href="" target="_blank">Take a VR tour of Yosemite National Park with President Obama</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">Obama chooses Jackson Park as the site for his Presidential Center</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">Stonewall Inn formally declared as national monument</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects selected to design the Obama Presidential Center</a></li></ul> Pollution-plagued Paris to ban cars from the side of the Seine Nicholas Korody 2016-09-27T13:49:00-04:00 >2016-09-27T14:19:05-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In an effort to curb air pollution, the city council of Paris has approved a controversial plan to pedestrianize the 3.3 km road that runs along the Right Bank of the Seine River. Stretching from the Tuileries Gardens to the Henri-IV tunnel near the Bastille, the road is currently used by some 43,000 cars a day. The plan would replace the roadway with wooden walkways and landscaping, and cost an estimated &euro;8 million.</p><p>The plan is supported by the Socialist government and faces opposition from the country&rsquo;s conservative faction, who argue that it will increase traffic in a city already jam-packed with cars. Nearly 55 percent of Parisians support the plan, according to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><em>the Independent</em></a>.&nbsp;</p><p>Air pollution in Paris can rival cities like Beijing, and is responsible for over 2,000 deaths per year.</p><p>For more urban initiatives intended to combat air pollution, follow these links:&nbsp;</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Barcelona's bold new plan to get cars off the road</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Smog-choked Beijing plans "ventilation corridors" to provide much-neede...</a></li></ul> The former-football stars tackling England's affordable housing shortage Nicholas Korody 2016-09-26T13:17:00-04:00 >2016-09-27T23:34:37-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="269" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A year ago, former England captain Rio Ferdinand, West Ham United skipper Mark Noble and ex-Brighton striker Bobby Zamora [unveiled] their Legacy Foundation &ndash; a regeneration charity with a plan to build a series of social and privately rentable housing schemes, backed by private investors. The stars (all three of whom have played for West Ham) are coming back to present their first project, worth &pound;400m, to build 1,300 homes on a 22-hectare site in a run-down area in Houghton Regis near Luton.</p></em><br /><br /><p></p><p>For more on housing-related issues in the UK, follow these links:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">As a new class of super rich investors displace the traditional elite, average Londoners are pushed further and further outside the city limits</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Almost half of Londoners support limits on building height</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Brexit will put even more strain on towns already pressed for housing</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">To live in London you can't be a Londoner</a></li></ul> LED streetlights may contribute to 'serious health conditions' says AMA, prompting cities to re-evaluate Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-09-26T13:16:00-04:00 >2016-10-04T12:03:49-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="390" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>high-intensity LED streetlights ... emit unseen blue light that can disturb sleep rhythms and possibly increase the risk of serious health conditions, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. [...] Some [researchers] noted that exposure to the blue-rich LED outdoor lights might decrease people&rsquo;s secretion of the hormone melatonin. Secreted at night, melatonin helps balance the reproductive, thyroid and adrenal hormones and regulates the body&rsquo;s circadian rhythm of sleeping and waking.</p></em><br /><br /><p>While the American Medical Association cautions cities to re-evaluate their use of high-intensity LED lights for health reasons, others have pointed out that most televisions and computers also emit the blue light wavelength found to be potentially harmful. Aside from human health concerns, LEDs are also "a major contributor" to anthropogenic light pollution in the night sky.</p><p>Related on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a title="This atlas shows how much light pollution has infiltrated night skies worldwide" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">This atlas shows how much light pollution has infiltrated night skies worldwide</a></li><li><a title="Not-So-Bright Lights, Big City" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Not-So-Bright Lights, Big City</a></li><li><a title="LEDs to be installed in the Sistine Chapel" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LEDs to be installed in the Sistine Chapel</a></li><li><a title="Scientists Develop Technique to Improve Flexible, Conductive, Transparent Glass" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Scientists Develop Technique to Improve Flexible, Conductive, Transparent Glass</a></li></ul> NYC Port Authority releases 5 design proposals for new bus terminal DianePham 2016-09-22T18:35:00-04:00 >2016-09-28T17:17:03-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="379" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>On Tuesday, an agreement was reached between West Side elected officials and the Port Authority that said the agency would expand the planning process for a new $10 billion bus terminal with more local input. And just today they&rsquo;ve revealed the five proposals that were submitted to a design competition to replace the currently loathed site.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Big-name firms Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects, Arcadis, AECOM, Perkins Eastman, and Archilier Architecture Consortium provided proposal, a number of which take on swooping forms and boast green roofs.</p> The end of Shenzhen’s Baishizhou 'urban village' Alexander Walter 2016-09-22T15:37:00-04:00 >2016-09-29T15:22:15-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;Village&rdquo; may not seem like the right term for a cluster of tenement-style walkups that can house more than 100,000 people.&nbsp;Chengzhongcun&nbsp;hang onto the name partly because of the familiarity evoked by the traditions and small-scale businesses that thrive among their migrant populations, and partly because when modern Shenzhen began growing, these places really were just villages in the middle of the city.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related stories in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A tragic tale of live-and-let-die development on Shanghai's Street of Eternal Happiness</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Ai Weiwei calls modern Chinese architecture 'fatalistic'</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Take a look at the rapid urbanization of China's Pearl River Delta</a></li></ul> aka *Old people afraid of the sky in big cities, featuring white streets and roofs and fast cheap trees Nam Henderson 2016-09-22T14:20:00-04:00 >2016-09-22T14:20:48-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="217" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>How many lives could be spared, the researchers then asked, if the city planted more trees and grass, replaced dark asphalt and concrete with light-colored and reflective roofs and pavement, and cut back on the excess heat seeping out of buildings and the tailpipes of cars and buses?</p></em><br /><br /><p>Madeline Ostrander visited&nbsp;Louisville Kentucky, to learn how one city is trying to&nbsp;cool it. With&nbsp;an increase in urban deforestation, extreme heat waves and global climate change, the urban heat-island effect is now a concern for politicians and non-profits. Not just researchers and&nbsp;scientists.</p><p>* h/t @<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bruce Sterling</a></p> LA City Councilman David Ryu calls for rapid roll-out of autonomous vehicles Nicholas Korody 2016-09-22T13:38:00-04:00 >2016-09-26T23:32:32-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>&ldquo;Ask any Los Angeles resident about L.A.&rsquo;s greatest challenges and the answer will most likely include: &lsquo;traffic&rsquo;,&rdquo; begins David E. Ryu, the L.A. City Councilman for the 4th District, in a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">call</a> for the rapid implementation of autonomous vehicles in the city.</p><p>Citing their potential to reduce traffic, &ldquo;create greater transportation equity&rdquo;, and reduce vehicular deaths, Ryu proposes that the Department of Transportation quickly put together a report on the benefits of implementing autonomous transit.</p><p>&ldquo;In the 20th century, Los Angeles&rsquo; streetcars and freeways each set national standards and propelled our quality of life and economy forward,&rdquo; writes Ryu. &ldquo;Today, we are mired in gridlock, and it is time once again for our city to lead the way, this time into the 21st century as the trailblazer on autonomous vehicle technology."</p><p>For more on autonomous vehicles, check out these articles:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The view from inside a self-driving Uber: "the technology is not quite ready"</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Japan gunning for Tokyo to take...</a></li></ul> Norman Foster reimagines global infrastructure strategies in new essay Julia Ingalls 2016-09-22T13:36:00-04:00 >2016-09-26T23:32:26-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="288" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Back in May, Foster + Partners unveiled their design for the Droneport, a modular shell-like structure that is constructed with local labor from earthen bricks and thin compressed tiles to create loading areas for food and medical-aid bearing transport drones. A version of the Droneport was built at this year's <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Venice Biennale</a> (which is open until November 27th).&nbsp;Now, in the freshly unveiled <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">thematic supplement to the&nbsp;</a><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">2015 Annual Statistical Report on United Nations Procurement,</a> Norman Foster has written an essay which builds upon the idea of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Buckminster Fuller</a>'s "trim tab" to help foster enormous change in Africa and other countries with relatively small, if holistically conceived, gestures such as the Droneport.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Norman writes: "There is a moral imperative to provide more globally available energy while seeking to conserve its consumption. The answer to this apparent paradox is to adopt&nbsp;a holistic approach to the design of sustainable communities in which the infrastructure and indi...</p> Introducing Bjarke Ingels' floating student housing, "Urban Rigger" Julia Ingalls 2016-09-22T12:48:00-04:00 >2016-10-17T17:04:23-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="350" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Bjarke Ingels has found the elusive silver lining in global sea level rise and the European affordable housing crisis in the form of "Urban Rigger," a series of inexpensive student housing complexes that are designed to float in the sea, especially in those cities which have dense urban cores next to the waterfront. The idea here is to provide students with affordable digs that are close to class while simultaneously making the most out of changing climate conditions and post-industrial port repurposing. The first complete Urban Rigger has already been assembled in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Copenhagen</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>According to an article in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">FastCompany</a>, "Each unit, which can house 12 students at once, is composed of modular shipping containers. These modules are powered by a photovoltaic array and use a heat-exchange system that draws upon the thermal mass of water to warm and cool the interiors. Meanwhile, an aerogel developed by NASA insulates the interiors."</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For the latest on Bjarke Ingels:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Play "Arkinoid" arcade on BIG...</a></li></ul> The downsides of the charming "holdout" houses Nicholas Korody 2016-09-20T13:25:00-04:00 >2016-09-28T23:47:43-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>There is something romantic about the idea of a holdout, a David to the big developer's Goliath, a protagonist&nbsp;for whom home matters more than money, a solitary survivor. In the Pixar movie "Up," the holdout is the hero. In the real-life Seattle version of the story&nbsp;that reportedly inspired the film's premise, an elderly woman who refused to sell her home became &mdash; along with her home itself &mdash; a city icon.</p></em><br /><br /><p><em>In practice, though, modern cities grow out of older ones in large part through the unglamorous process of parcel assembly &mdash; of fitting together the once-smaller pieces of the city, "Tetris"-like. And while the result often produces fantastically bizarre neighbors, cities can't evolve if every property owner is such a hero.</em></p><p>For more on tiny houses, follow this link:</p><ul><li><a href="" target="_blank">The Onion takes on the 'Tiny House' movement</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">"Tiny Houses in the City" showcases big opportunities in small housing</a></li><li><a href="" target="_blank">The Tiny House Fantasy</a></li></ul> When designing for mental health, how far can architects go? Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-09-19T13:23:00-04:00 >2016-09-22T23:01:11-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;Genetics, early experiences, family relationships and social settings can&rsquo;t be addressed through urban design,&rdquo; McCay explains. &ldquo;But urban design can and should play a role, just as it does for physical disorders, which have equally complex causes.&rdquo; [...] But experts believe guidelines for healthy urban environments are currently failing to take this growing awareness into consideration. [...] &ldquo;understanding of these issues is not yet mainstream&rdquo; in the architectural community.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Layla McCay, director of the Centre for Urban Design and Mental Health, outlines the various ways urban design and mental health intersect:</p><p></p><p>Check out more videos from UDMH on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">their website</a>.</p><p>For more news on urban psychology:</p><ul><li><a title="Measured Genius: One-to-One #29 with Pierluigi Serraino, author of 'The Creative Architect'" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Measured Genius: One-to-One #29 with Pierluigi Serraino, author of 'The Creative Architect'</a></li><li><a title="The high psychological cost we pay for boring buildings" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The high psychological cost we pay for boring buildings</a></li><li><a title="Putting entire cities on the psychiatrist's couch" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Putting entire cities on the psychiatrist's couch</a></li><li><a title='Designing and understanding the "Happy City"' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Designing and understanding the "Happy City"</a></li></ul> The view from inside a self-driving Uber: "the technology is not quite ready" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-09-15T13:06:00-04:00 >2016-09-18T22:35:45-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>During my ride, along a few miles of road near Uber&rsquo;s testing facility in an old industrial neighborhood, the car performed admirably in many difficult situations...and I mostly felt pretty safe. However, several times the person behind the wheel needed to take control [...] it will take time for Uber and others to perfect fully automated driving. In fact, it remains unclear what needs to be done before it can be considered safe to remove humans from the driver&rsquo;s seat.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More on Uber and autonomous vehicles:</p><ul><li><a title="Japan gunning for Tokyo to take on driverless vehicles by 2020 Olympic Games" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Japan gunning for Tokyo to take on driverless vehicles by 2020 Olympic Games</a></li><li><a title="Tesla Model S driver suffers fatal crash while using autopilot, in first known death involving an autonomous vehicle" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Tesla Model S driver suffers fatal crash while using autopilot, in first known death involving an autonomous vehicle</a></li><li><a title="Google, Uber, Lyft, Ford and Volvo join forces to lobby for autonomous vehicles" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Google, Uber, Lyft, Ford and Volvo join forces to lobby for autonomous vehicles</a></li><li><a title="Beverly Hills wants to provide driverless cars as public transit" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Beverly Hills wants to provide driverless cars as public transit</a></li><li><a title='"In LiDAR We Trust" &ndash; Poking the subconscious of autonomous vehicles with special guest Geoff Manaugh, on Archinect Sessions #43' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"In LiDAR We Trust" &ndash; Poking the subconscious of autonomous vehicles with special guest Geoff Manaugh, on Archinect Sessions #43</a></li></ul> Saddam Hussain's architectural heritage—and what to do with it Alexander Walter 2016-09-13T18:30:00-04:00 >2016-09-18T22:37:17-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="290" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>During his time in power, as head of state and as leader of the all-powerful, secularist Ba&rsquo;th party, Saddam would oversee an unprecedented program of monumental development across the historic city of Baghdad. This was not limited to monuments of war and hollow bronze shells, but enormous palatial complexes, museums, art galleries, and civic squares [...] marshal it, awkwardly, unevenly, into the post-industrial age, a modern city shaped by the aspirations and egotistical tastes of a despot.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related stories in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Iraq honors Zaha Hadid with commemorative stamp &mdash; which features rejected Tokyo stadium design</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Destruction of Iraq&rsquo;s oldest Christian monastery by ISIS militants went unreported for 16 months</a></li></ul> Are enough high-wage jobs being created across the United States? Julia Ingalls 2016-09-13T13:52:00-04:00 >2016-09-18T22:35:09-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="384" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Unsurprisingly, the majority of the U.S.' job growth over the past five years has been centered in large metro areas like <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Los Angeles</a> and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New York</a>. What might be surprising is how the majority of those newly created <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">jobs</a> are either "mid-wage" or "low-wage" jobs, here defined as those that pay under $21.14 an hour. In a study conducted by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">CityLab's</a> Richard Florida based on facts compiled by the economic data modeling firm Emsi, Florida notes that:&nbsp;</p><p><em>Low-wage jobs accounted for the largest increase in new jobs between 2011 and 2016, adding 4.5 million jobs, compared to 4.1 million high-wage jobs and 3.5 million mid-wage jobs. Low-wage jobs accounted for 34 percent of jobs in 2016 (a total of 48.2 million jobs), while mid-wage jobs accounted for 29 percent (a total of 40.7 million jobs)...</em></p><p><em>The top ten metros for job growth are a mix of knowledge-based and service-based metros. The tech hub of Provo, Utah, tops the list with a 26.8 percent increase in jobs; Austin (21.9 percent), San Jose ...</em></p>