Archinect - News 2015-10-07T04:31:53-04:00 A city for the future but devoid of people Nicholas Korody 2015-10-06T18:07:00-04:00 >2015-10-07T00:09:06-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="360" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In the arid plains of the southern New Mexico desert, between the site of the first atomic bomb test and the U.S.-Mexico border, a new city is rising from the sand. Planned for a population of 35,000, the city will showcase a modern business district downtown, and neat rows of terraced housing in the suburbs. It will be supplied with pristine streets, parks, malls and a church. But no one will ever call it home.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Planned by the telecommunications and tech firm Pegasus Global Holdings, the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">CITE</a> (Center for Innovation, Testing and Evaluation) is a $1 billion plan to build a model city to test out and develop new technologies.<br><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br>With specialized zones for agriculture, energy, and water treatment, the city would also play host to tests for new tech like self-driving cars, responsive roads, and "smart homes" of all kinds.</p><p>CITE would have built-in sensors throughout, as well as a central control room to oversee operations.&nbsp;<br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br>CITE does not plan to have humans inhabiting the city to allow for faster testing and fewer potential mishaps. But that presents its own issues: after all, these technologies are ultimately intended for social use, and even "smart cities" have to be populated by humans.</p><p>"The inhabitants of cities are not just interchangeable individuals that can be dropped into experimental settings," Professor Steve Rayner, co-director of the Oxford Programme for the Future of Cities, tells CNN.&nbsp;"Th...</p> Urban Parasites, Data-Driven Urbanism, and the Case for Architecture Orhan Ayyüce 2015-10-02T14:08:00-04:00 >2015-10-05T10:20:59-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>at least some part of architectural practice needs to move on from having buildings as the only output. The answer to every urban question cannot always be a building, clearly. Whilst buildings may be part of some solutions, there are broader, deeper questions in play&mdash;good architects see this, but the practice (from education up) is still not exploring this implied question broadly enough.</p></em><br /><br /><p>A call for architecture, for architects, their schools, their buildings and their cities via the technology they still struggle to grasp regardless of their software driven shaping skills, a valuable read by Dan Hill of City of Sound. Technological effect is elsewhere.</p> Up to 50% of all renting London households are living in poverty Julia Ingalls 2015-10-02T05:26:00-04:00 >2015-10-01T14:30:54-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="341" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>According to an insight study performed by the think tank <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New London Architecture</a>, the dimensions of the London housing crisis are spectacularly bad: 80 percent of all new homes are only affordable to 20 percent of residents, while a near majority of all renting households are living in poverty. The study predicts that the city will add 70,000 residents per year, resulting in a total population of 11 million by 2050 (an increase of 2.4 million from this year's population of 8.6 million).</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Billionaire investors</a> aren't helping the housing shortage: 61 percent of all new homes are bought as investments, without any intention of being occupied by the owners. However, not all is lost: London's relatively low urban density makes it an ideal place for increased housing development, provided that the housing can actually be afforded by the people who intend to live in it.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> A wrap-up of Vancouver's "City Fabric" Julia Ingalls 2015-10-01T19:00:00-04:00 >2015-10-01T20:26:08-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Construction safety netting may not sound like the stuff which picturesque <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">cityscapes</a> are made of, and yet: <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Vancouver, B.C</a>. was host to an art installation known as "City Fabric" this past August and September which produced more gorgeous visuals (and sly references to real estate speculation) than your typical netting.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Designed by artist Rebecca Bayer and architect Matthew Soules, the installation hung beneath the south side of Burrard Street Bridge between concrete piers as a kind of celebration of the ephemeral, specifically "the temporary permanence of construction debris netting; beautiful, impoverished for its utilitarian use, yet profoundly normal."&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The installation, which was sponsored by 221A and The Burred Arts Foundation, officially closed on September 30th and consisted of 800 lineal feet of the netting.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Paris pulls off an (almost) car-free day Julia Ingalls 2015-10-01T15:38:00-04:00 >2015-10-01T15:39:18-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="320" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Paris&rsquo;s car-free day was not without controversy, not least because it wasn&rsquo;t a totally carless day and was limited to only around one-third of the city. After a standoff with police, authorities were only able to make car-free certain parts of the city centre, stretching between Bastille and the Champs Elys&eacute;es, and the outer Bois de Boulogne and Bois de Vincennes, and only between 11am and 6pm. In the rest of the city, cars were allowed but at 20km an hour.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Paris, which had a mostly car-free day on Sunday, September 27th, experienced smog-free blue skies and a largely smiling populace, but it's not the first major metropolis to sort of go pedestrian. During a July weekend in 2011, famously car-centric Los Angeles shut down one of its main transit arteries, the 405 freeway, for infrastructural modification in what was nicknamed "<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Carmaggedon</a>." The stay-off-the-roads frenzy leading up to the closure was so successful that most people took a staycation in their homes, leading city officials to play down the threat the next time the 405 needed to be shut down. (People still needed to spend money to stimulate the local economy, after all.)</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Grappling with the legacy of apartheid design Liam Otten 2015-10-01T12:15:00-04:00 >2015-10-01T12:15:10-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="408" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Johannesburg is a modern global city, the second largest in Africa, its metropolitan area home to nearly 8 million people. Yet the legacy of apartheid has left it a city of spatial segregation &mdash; a city of walls, of racially divided townships and populations pushed to the peripheries.</p><p>Last summer, nine&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Master of Urban Design</a>&nbsp;students from the Sam Fox School of Design &amp; Visual Arts traveled to Johannesburg and Dubai, United Arab Emirates, as part of the 2015 Global Urbanism Studio. Led by&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">John Hoal</a>, PhD, professor and chair of urban design, and lecturer Matthew Bernstine, the immersive 13-week studio explored commonalities among, and differences between, some of the world&rsquo;s most important urban centers.</p><p>&ldquo;This is what I call a research/action studio,&rdquo; Hoal said. &ldquo;Students do significant original research, but they also resolve that research into a specific design.&rdquo;</p><p>This 2015 studio centered on&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Corridors of Freedom</a>, an ambitious urban design program that aims to improve transportation thro...</p> Exceeding height restrictions to break a housing logjam in San Francisco Julia Ingalls 2015-09-30T15:00:00-04:00 >2015-09-30T15:00:36-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="365" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Neighborhoods across the west side of San Francisco could see thousands of new housing units under a measure Mayor Ed Lee is proposing that would allow builders to exceed current height restrictions in exchange for including more affordable units.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The Mayor's proposal would allow builders to add two stories of additional height to the current building height restrictions to help the notoriously expensive metropolis of San Francisco become more affordable to middle-class denizens (unlike federal or state sponsored initiatives, which target low-income groups). To exceed the height restrictions, thirty percent of the new development's units would have to be affordable; for those projects that are fully comprised of affordable units, developers would be able to add a third story.&nbsp;In San Francisco, middle-class is defined as "families making between 120 and 140 percent of area median income, which is $122,000 to $142,000 for a family of four."&nbsp;</p><p>For more on San Francisco's housing crisis, do check out:</p><p>&bull; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Airbnb rentals cut deep into San Francisco housing stock, report says</a></p><p>&bull; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">No room for affordable housing in SF? Build it in Oakland</a></p><p>&bull; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Markasaurus does the math on SF housing prices</a>&nbsp;</p> Maxwell Anderson Moves back to NYC and the New Cities Foundation Donna Sink 2015-09-29T13:16:00-04:00 >2015-09-30T08:50:35-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="730" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;My growing interest in how cultural districts can shape cities led me to this new, exciting opportunity in New York City.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Maxwell Anderson is returning to New York, to be Director of Grant Programs at The New Cities Foundation.&nbsp; Dallas' loss (and formerly Indianapolis' deeply felt loss) is good urbanism's gain.&nbsp; I am excited about this change in focus by someone who I know to be a great thinker.</p><p>Press release from NCF <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> Explore Manhattan When It Was Just Forests and Creeks With the 1609 Welikia Map Alyssa Alimurung 2015-09-28T14:29:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T14:28:57-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="325" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The Welikia Project, formerly known as the Mannahatta Project, has gotten a powerful update that now lets you explore New York City's historic ecology using a satellite map that imagines how Manhattan might have looked back in 1609&mdash;and all the years between then and now.</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> London's Garden Bridge endangered by public funding shortfall Julia Ingalls 2015-09-25T04:34:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:13:14-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>The London garden bridge project has been placed in jeopardy after a London council withdrew its support because of public costs and the Labour mayoral candidate, Sadiq Khan, said he would ditch the proposed horticultural Thames river crossing if he took office.</p></em><br /><br /><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Thomas Heatherwick</a>'s proposed Garden Bridge, which recently inspired <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">a satirical contest of unpalatable entries</a>, may be doomed to remain a hotly contested rendering. The &pound;30 million of public funds needed to fund the bridge has temporarily been withdrawn because Lambeth council leader Lib Peck said the cost is "unjustified." Both current <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mayor Boris Johnson</a>&nbsp;and chancellor George Osborne have pledged &pound;30 million of his own to the project, but it will still need additional funding to bridge the gap.</p> Archinect's critical round-up of Los Angeles' Broad Museum Julia Ingalls 2015-09-23T15:50:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:40:34-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="381" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>From a super-sized cheese grater, to a&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">contraceptive sponge</a>, to an inadvertent fun house ride, the critics have thoroughly analogized the new Broad museum in mostly positive (if occasionally biting) reviews. To follow up with&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Amelia's review, published earlier today</a>, we offer some other critical perspectives on LA's latest architectural landmark.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The L.A. Times</a>' Christopher Hawthorne frames the museum's relative success principally in terms of the political and physical struggle it took to realize it (Broad is currently suing the structure's skin fabricators for what he claims were costly, time-delaying fabrication errors). "It wouldn't be fair to say that the museum, which has moments of real charm, buckles under the burden of those expectations and conflicts. But in a number of places, including its surprisingly punchless facade, it shows the considerable strain of holding up that weight."</p><p>Hawthorne also reflects on the building in terms of&nbsp;Diller Scofidio + Renfro's overall body of...</p> A bicyclist's perspective on the dangers and joys of riding in L.A. Julia Ingalls 2015-09-23T15:49:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T23:40:27-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>While you&rsquo;re hypertensive in traffic listening to NPR, I have seen dolphins frolicking (and homeless men fighting over a shopping cart); I&rsquo;ve smelled the taco trucks and heard all the languages of kids playing at morning recess. I sweat and shiver; I feel elation and real fear. In short, I feel alive. And so I ride.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Despite its annoyances, difficulties, and outright dangers, Peter Flax's take on bicycle riding in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">L.A.</a>&mdash;prompted in part by the city's recent decision "to create hundreds of miles of new protected bike lanes, shrinking some streets in the process"&mdash;combines a reporter's clear-eyed sensibility with an enthusiast's joy. In what is apparently an all-too typical encounter, he describes an&nbsp;incident with&nbsp;a dangerous driver: "Once, on Curson near Pico, a black Mercedes swerved into my path and the side mirror grazed my hip. I rolled up to the guy&rsquo;s driver&rsquo;s side window at a red light; he had his phone on his lap, watching a video. Without saying a word, I just rode away, bewildered and angry."&nbsp;</p><p>Want to read more on bicycling developments in L.A.&nbsp;and beyond? Click below:</p><p>&bull; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LA Gets its First Parking-Protected Bike Lanes</a></p><p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">From California to Texas, car culture is losing its monopoly</a></p><p>&bull; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Protected bike lanes strengthen city economy, report finds</a></p>... Editor's Picks #429 Nam Henderson 2015-09-18T12:46:00-04:00 >2015-09-28T21:21:27-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Today's Editor's Picks is a special themed "place based" edition - highlighting content (old/newish) from the archives/site - about Denver and Colorado. Partly as an apology for the brief/unexpected lull in the Picks. Also, inspired by my own recent relocation to The Mile High City. Just one part of an ongoing attempt to learn about my new home.</p></em><br /><br /><p>While MArch students at the University of Colorado, Denver, Patrick Beseda and Lacy Williams realized a design/build project for a micro-dwelling. <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">FOUNDhouse</a> inspired by the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">WikiHouse project</a>, was an exploration of digital fabrication, the possibilities of DIY and the democratization of housing/shelter.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><br><strong>News</strong><br>Back in the 1990s the Denver area was site of an <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">extreme makeover </a>(aka environmental remediation) for the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">6,500 acre</a> Rocky Flats DOE nuclear industrial site.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Archinect ex-Editor in Chief | Staff Editor <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">John Jourden</a>&nbsp;coined <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Bil(Denver)bao</a>&nbsp;in response to the news that <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">David Adjaye</a>, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Steven Holl</a>, and <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Daniel Libeskind</a>, all had active projects in the same city - Denver. Similarly in a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">post</a> on how cities across America are gambling on architecture to revitalize aging downtowns, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Orhan Ayy&uuml;ce</a>&nbsp;criticized "<em>i hate the new 'ready made culture' trend. new museums=starbucks</em>".</p><p>Richard Florida used occupational data from the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">labor market data and research firm EMSI</a> to map&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">America's Leading Design Cit...</a></p> London Mayor Boris Johnson pledges £285,000 to crowdfunding projects Julia Ingalls 2015-09-18T07:38:00-04:00 >2015-09-17T19:40:58-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="518" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>This week, he signed over &pound;285,000 of his &pound;9m High Street Fund, created in March, to projects which will "re-energise the capital's high streets"...the mayor's office is donating to these projects through Spacehive, a civic crowdfunding website through which campaigners can raise money from the public to fund their community schemes.</p></em><br /><br /><p>From a proposed revitalization project known as the "Peckham Coal Line" that, much like New York City's <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">High Line</a>, would transform abandoned coal sidings into a foliage-rich walkway for pedestrians and cyclists, to a public library in an alley known as a "Literalley," designers and dreamers alike are being encouraged to enter their high street improving projects into a bid to be awarded money from <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Mayor Johnson</a>. His favorite projects will receive up to &pound;20,000 each.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> 11th annual "Parking Day" transforms parking spaces into public spaces Julia Ingalls 2015-09-18T00:04:00-04:00 >2015-09-29T00:02:58-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In 2005, the now defunct Rebar placed coins in a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">San Francisco</a> parking meter not to park a car but to erect a small public park. Every third Friday in September since then, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">activists worldwide</a> who wish to foster a conversation about the lack of public space have been transforming parking spaces into everything from greenery to art installations to places for wedding ceremonies. This September 18th, potential participants are encouraged to download the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Parking Day Manifesto</a>, which is a how-to-guide on transforming that slab of asphalt into an engaging <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">public space</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> 100 renderings of ideas to solve London's housing crisis released Julia Ingalls 2015-09-17T07:12:00-04:00 >2015-09-16T15:28:45-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="334" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The international competition organized by think-tank New London Architecture and the Mayor of London has released 100 renderings of proposed solutions to <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">London</a>'s housing crisis.&nbsp;Attracting over 200 entries from 16 countries around the world, the competition includes submissions from respected London-based architectural firms including&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">dRMM</a>,&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Rogers Stirk Harbour and Partners</a>, and&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Grimshaw Architects</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The ideas cover a variety of&nbsp;conceptual ground, although the innovative use and repurposing/modification of existing spaces appears in numerous renderings, as shown in the entries of Akira Yamanaka and Hal Architects:</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Several proposals make use of the Thames and other waterways to create floating housing, such as these renderings from Baca Architects and dRMM:</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Starting on October 15th, the 100 shortlisted entries will be on public display for free at the&nbsp;NLA galleries in The Building Centre near Russell Square, and ten winners will be announced by the end of October. Those winners will be...</p> Jakarta's "car-free days" are only the start of the city's long journey to becoming bike-friendly Justine Testado 2015-09-11T18:13:00-04:00 >2015-09-11T21:46:42-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Ask a cyclist what it&rsquo;s like to ride in Indonesia&rsquo;s capital &ndash; a sprawling megalopolis of 10.2 million people...More than likely, they&rsquo;ll tell you it&rsquo;s outright dangerous...Car-free days may be popular, but there is almost no [cyclist] infrastructure... [However, there] is hope among cyclists that bike lanes will become a priority after the city&rsquo;s [mass rapid transport] system is finished in 2019. In the meantime, several young innovators are taking matters into their own hands.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More on Archinect:</p><p><a title="Australia's &quot;biggest bike-lane skeptic&quot; plans to remove a popular Sydney cycleway" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Australia's "biggest bike-lane skeptic" plans to remove a popular Sydney cycleway</a></p><p><a title="As bicycle ownership in North Korea rises, Pyongyang introduces bike lanes" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">As bicycle ownership in North Korea rises, Pyongyang introduces bike lanes</a></p><p><a title="Copenhagen could ax its pioneering city bike program by month's end" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Copenhagen could ax its pioneering city bike program by month's end</a></p><p><a title="Why a bike city? Why not a mix of biking and transit?" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Why a bike city? Why not a mix of biking and transit?</a></p> NBBJ proposes 3 moving walkways to replace London's Circle Line Julia Ingalls 2015-09-11T05:50:00-04:00 >2015-09-13T10:19:21-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Instead of relying on a subway that breaks down and causes interminable delays, what if the 17 miles of London's Circle Line were replaced with three moving walkways, much like the ones in airports, that allow pedestrians to step on at three miles per hour and then amble over to a fast lane of 15 miles per hour?</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>According to&nbsp;James Pinkerton, an architectural assistant at the London office of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">NBBJ</a>&nbsp;which proposed the idea,&nbsp;the travelators would be easier to maintain than a traditional train system precisely because of its three separate walkways. If one broke down, the "two further lines would run smoothly," forming a ceaseless band of movement that wouldn't need to pause for stops or be held up by one solitary malfunctioning train. Travelers could simply walk on and walk off.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>"We came up with this idea that benefits the city as a whole," he explained to me in a brief phone interview. Pinkerton&nbsp;was also part of the NBBJ team that created the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">shadowless tower</a>, which was designed from a s...</p> Mass transit may benefit expansion of Uber and other for-hire car services Julia Ingalls 2015-09-10T19:21:00-04:00 >2015-09-10T19:21:37-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="342" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A combination of (mostly) public transit along with some Uber rides can be affordable for a wider range of customers than Uber alone.</p></em><br /><br /><p>According to a study of New York City's private-car hiring habits, many of those who hired <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Uber</a> did so as an extension of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">public transit</a>: in other words, instead of Uber-ing all the way to a particular destination, a wider socioeconomic spectrum of New Yorkers frequently use some combination of public transit and private car services in their daily lives. For Uber to expand beyond the got-money-to-burn segment of the population, places with public transit may be a great place to start.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For the latest (and arguably) greatest in Uber news:</p><p>&bull;&nbsp;<a title="Uber brings Mad Max to Seattle" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Uber brings Mad Max to Seattle</a></p><p>&bull; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Uber faces suspension and $7.3M fine in California</a></p><p>&bull; <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Two Uber executives detained in France</a></p> Passage: an architectural intervention to span the Mediterranean Sea Nicholas Korody 2015-09-10T17:53:00-04:00 >2015-09-14T18:38:58-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Last year, the group <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">1W1P</a> &ndash; 1Week1Project &ndash; created the memorable speculative project "<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Qatar World Cup Memorial</a>," a "scalable building that raises awareness about the number of workers who died during the construction of the stadiums for the 2022&nbsp;World&nbsp;Cup&nbsp;in Qatar."</p><p>Now, the collaborative duo of&nbsp;Axel de Stampa and Sylvain Macaux are back with another provocative project &ndash; this one just as timely, and a little closer to home for the French architects. Entitled "Passage," the project envisions a megastructure-like intervention that spans the Mediterranean, bridging the northern and southern shores and, in the process, the geopolitical and economic borders that distinguish them.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>"Crossing the Mediterranean is one of the most perilous journeys for the migrants seeking sanctuary in Europe," they state in the project brief. With reference to Operation Triton, the border security operation led by Frontext (the EU's joint border agency), 1W1P invokes the ongoing migrant crisis in Europe ...</p> L.A. seeks to accelerate infrastructure projects in advance of potential Olympics Nicholas Korody 2015-09-10T15:10:00-04:00 >2015-09-10T15:49:33-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="336" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Citing L.A.'s quest to host the 2024 Summer Olympics, Los Angeles County transportation officials are seeking to fast-track two of Metro's most anticipated rail projects. In letters sent Tuesday and obtained by The Times, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority formally asked to join a Federal Transit Administration pilot program that could accelerate construction on a subway to the Westside and a rail connection to Los Angeles International Airport...</p></em><br /><br /><p>Pending federal approval (and cash &ndash; $1 billion, to be precise), Metro hopes to pursue an "extremely aggressive" schedule, completing the Purple Line subway extension as well as the LAX "people-mover" by the potential opening of a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">2024 Los Angeles Olympics</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Currently, the Purple Line is scheduled to extend from its current terminus in Koreatown towards the Westside over the course of 16 years, and in three stages. According to the Times, the new plan would mean that all three stages would be worked concurrently: Koreatown to Mid-Wilshire, Mid-Wilshire to Century City, Century City to West LA.</p><p>The LAX "people-mover," a much-need and anticipated terminal train, is currently scheduled to start service by 2028. Under the accelerated timeline, that would be moved to 2024 as well. In addition, it would be linked to the currently-planned connection between the Green Line, which runs across the South Bay, and the Expo Line, which cuts across Mid-City.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Alongside the hoped-for $1-billion federa...</p> New website on the deep web encourages architects to leak neighborhood-disrupting building plans Julia Ingalls 2015-09-09T18:34:00-04:00 >2015-09-12T19:11:19-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="339" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>&ldquo;There are a lot of people working in architecture who are very frustrated with what&rsquo;s happening, but feel like they don&rsquo;t have a voice to speak out,&rdquo; said Sarah, another of Concrete Action&rsquo;s co-founders, who also wished to remain anonymous. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re hoping that this is going to give them an avenue to do that without worrying about losing their jobs or getting into trouble.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Architects who are dismayed by working on projects that tend to harm, not improve, the neighborhoods in which they are sited now have a secure whistleblowing option: U.K.-based <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Concrete Action</a> allows architects to anonymously submit rent-inflating building plans to the public. The site, which started in response to a slew of development of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">high-rent projects in low income areas</a>, also helps the concerned citizen crack the often arcane and jargon-heavy <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">city planning process</a>. Architects can use encrypted methods to submit copies of the plans and alert the public to just what developers are coveting, er, planning.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Work on largest urban computer model commenced. therepublic 2015-09-08T13:05:00-04:00 >2015-09-08T13:05:51-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="514" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The Republic, a computer model of a future urban floor plan for an administrative and institutional area has commenced and aims to be unparalleled in size and complexity. Its initial aim is to produce a series of audiovisual dialogues exploring the urban architecture. Longer term objectives are for an audiovisual ideas resource for architects, urban planners and students. What is unique to this project is the incorporation on metamaterial concepts in the design which are normally found in large geometric structures such as photonic crystals, a rapidly growing area of nano engineering. More details can be found at <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a> (PDF).</p> Largest wildlife overpass in U.S. proposed for L.A.'s 101 Freeway, could ease area's roadkill problem Justine Testado 2015-09-03T18:28:00-04:00 >2015-09-21T08:07:06-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Mountain lions, bobcats and other wildlife would have less chance of becoming roadkill if [California] adopts a plan to build a [165-foot-wide, 200-foot-long] landscaped bridge over the 101 Freeway in Agoura Hills...Urbanization has taken a toll on Southern California&rsquo;s mountain lion population, spurring battles over shrinking territory and a depletion of genetic diversity because of inbreeding.</p></em><br /><br /><p>More on Archinect:<img title="" alt="" src=""><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">33-story endangered species picture show</a></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Fancy $48M animal terminal to open in JFK Airport next year</a></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Chinese sinkhole develops its own eco-system</a></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Our infrastructure is expanding to include animals</a></p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hummingbird Drones and other Bio-inspired Robotics</a></p> The architect who wants New Orleans learn a lesson or two from Amsterdam Alexander Walter 2015-09-03T14:54:00-04:00 >2015-09-03T15:03:21-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>David Waggonner is an urban and environmental architect. Since Hurricane Katrina decimated his city, he&rsquo;s been focusing on urban stormwater management, mapping out designs for New Orleans that would mimic the way Dutch cities like Amsterdam and Rotterdam deal with water. In the Netherlands, people &ldquo;invite water into the city,&rdquo; meaning water is visible everywhere. [...] &ldquo;In New Orleans, we&rsquo;ve hidden and squandered the asset.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related on Archinect and our sister site Bustler:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Louisiana is Disappearing into the Sea</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Post-Katrina: Will New Orleans still be New Orleans?</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Changing Course teams present final 100-year plans to restore Lower Mississippi River Delta</a> (Bustler)</li></ul> Google Street View captures beautiful public space transformations Julia Ingalls 2015-09-02T20:02:00-04:00 >2015-09-04T14:16:19-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="489" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A Brazilian urban planning collective called Urb-i...scoured Google Street View images to find the most stunning public space transformations from around the world. The results give us hope that our cities are becoming more beautiful places to live.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Cheer up: not everything is getting worse, at least not if you check out these comparison shots of real places from around the globe captured on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Google Street View</a>. Compiled by Urb-i, these 41 intersections and urban streets are studies in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">pedestrian-friendliness</a>; as the years melt by, many of the municipalities and cities strip away traffic lanes and replace them with sidewalk planters, pavers, and other traffic-calming elements. In some cases, cars are removed entirely, letting people (and greenery) retake the streets. Here's a view of&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hungary</a>:</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>A street in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Detroit</a>:</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Also in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Montreal</a>:</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> Requirements for affordable housing in Chicago under attack from developers Nicholas Korody 2015-09-02T15:24:00-04:00 >2015-09-05T18:59:18-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="425" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>As Chicago prepares to enter a new era of ramped-up affordable-housing development, a key question is whether private developers will go along with the city&rsquo;s new guidances. A lawsuit filed... last Thursday shows signs of possible peril for the city&rsquo;s low-income housing agenda. At the heart of the lawsuit is the Affordable Requirements Ordinance (ARO), which is part of Chicago&rsquo;s five-year &ldquo;Bouncing Back&rdquo; plan for increasing affordable housing. [...]</p></em><br /><br /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> A bamboo skyscraper fosters public life Julia Ingalls 2015-09-01T14:20:00-04:00 >2015-09-05T08:15:03-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="363" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>A shortlisted finalist in the 2015 <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">World Architecture&nbsp;Festival</a> awards, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">CRG Architects</a>' Bamboo Skyscraper is not only noteworthy for its unusual choice of material, but its vision of what constitutes a <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">skyscraper</a>. Instead of focusing on a single prominent tower, the design is a cluster of gradually rising volumes that interconnect and share a central vertical core. Stainless steel is used for joint material between the high-tensile-strength <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">bamboo</a> tubes, while <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">EFTE</a> is used for the facade.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Sustainability drove the initial design concept, as did a desire for fostering greater public space and communal interactions within the cluster. According to a statement by CRG, "It is up to artists, designers and architects to find an answer to the question how current technology can breathe new life into the urban environment and into public domain."</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The 247,000 square meter complex, which boasts office, entertainment, and hotel/residential spaces, also has a helix slope for bicycle access.</p> Binational Urbanism – On the Road to Paradise Released BOARD 2015-09-01T10:13:00-04:00 >2015-09-01T12:23:42-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="415" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Binational urbanism has the potential to become one of the most interesting forms of life in the twenty-first century.</p></em><br /><br /><p>The Amsterdam-based publishing house <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">trancityxvaliz</a> just released Bernd Upmeyer&rsquo;s new book entitled <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">&ldquo;Binational Urbanism &ndash; On the Road to Paradise&rdquo;</a>.<br><br>&ldquo;Never before was the mobility of individuals higher than it is today. People work and live not only in different places, but often even in different countries. Binational Urbanism examines the way of life of people who start a second life in a second city in a second nation-state, without saying goodbye to their first city. They live in constant transit between two homes, between two countries.</p><p>Binational urbanists come from all strata of society, from the highly educated and cosmopolitan creative classes to the working class. Through their continuous change of location, binational urbanists appear to be living in a state that is characterized by a constant longing, or a constant homesickness, for the other city. The author interviewed people of Turkish origin currently living in Germany, who commute regularly between cities in Germany a...</p> Antonia Malchik on the end of walking in America Alexander Walter 2015-08-31T18:39:00-04:00 >2015-08-31T18:48:41-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="341" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>For decades, Americans have been losing their ability, even their right, to walk. [...] there are vast blankets and folds of the country where the ability to walk &ndash; to open a door and step outside and go somewhere or nowhere without getting behind the wheel of a car &ndash; is a struggle, a fight. A risk. [...] we encourage car travel and discourage moving on foot. More than discourage it, we criminalise it where deemed necessary.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Related:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">NY Mayor de Blasio's Times Square overhaul runs into massive opposition</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MIT's "Placelet" sensors technologize old-fashioned observation methods for placemaking</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Why Can't One Walk To The Super Bowl?</a></li></ul>