Archinect - News 2016-10-25T15:16:13-04:00 One-to-One #43 with George Tsypin, stage designer behind the 2014 Sochi Olympics' opening ceremony and "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-24T15:29:00-04:00 >2016-10-24T15:34:32-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="421" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>You probably don&rsquo;t recognize George Tsypin&rsquo;s name, but you&rsquo;re almost certainly familiar with his projects. After training as an architect in Moscow, Tsypin moved to New York to study theater design, and it&rsquo;s now safe to say millions upon millions of people have seen his work. He&rsquo;s designed stage sets for the MTV VMA&rsquo;s, operas, Broadway plays, and the 2014 Winter Olympics&rsquo; Opening Ceremony at Sochi, among many others.</p><p>Tsypin's work is now captured in&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><em>GEORGE TSYPIN OPERA FACTORY: Invisible City</em></a>, released on October 18 by Princeton Architectural Press. We spoke about designing for theatrical and mass media performances, and how his architectural training grounds his practice.</p><p>Our interview begins with Tsypin's account of working in&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">5Pointz</a>, the infamous graffiti building in Long Island City. Special thanks to Princeton Architectural Press for helping coordinate the interview.</p><p>Listen to&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">One-to-One</a>&nbsp;#43 with&nbsp;<strong>George Tsypin</strong>:</p><ul><li><strong>iTunes</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Click here to listen&nbsp;and subscribe to the new&nbsp;"Archinect Sessi...</a></li></ul> How Frank Gehry was won over to design the Watts Children's Institute pro bono Alexander Walter 2016-10-21T13:44:00-04:00 >2016-10-22T23:39:57-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="366" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>"We explained what the agency does and what we stand for, and he gave me a handshake right there," offering to work pro bono. [...] Of his design &mdash; a series of two-story, garden-surrounded buildings that echo the modest scale of the neighborhood, their shiny roofs the only Gehry-esque note &mdash; he says: "This building is not fancy but has all of my heart and soul in it. I worked hard to make spaces for the kids and families that would use it so that they would feel special."</p></em><br /><br /><p>Gehry's Watts involvement previously in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Frank Gehry-designed children's center planned for Watts neighborhood in L.A.</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Can a Frank Gehry design help change the dynamic of Watts?</a></li></ul> Tom Wiscombe redesigns the L.A. billboard (and is chosen over Zaha Hadid's proposal) Julia Ingalls 2016-10-20T12:39:00-04:00 >2016-10-23T21:53:07-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="479" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Although Los Angeles has had its battles over <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">supergraphics</a>&mdash;those painted on advertisements that often stretch multiple stories on a building's facade&mdash;the billboard as a concept has received substantially less attention, unless the provocative imagery on it causes fender benders. However, Tom Wiscombe's proposal for digital, vertically aligned, two-sided billboards that allow people to walk inside of them injects new life into an otherwise sleepy structure, making them less car-centric and more about public space.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The proposed billboards, which were chosen via a West Hollywood RFP over designs submitted by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Zaha Hadid</a>, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Gensler</a>, and the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">MAK Center</a>, will be placed in public plazas along West Hollywood's section of Sunset Boulevard.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For more on Tom Wiscombe:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A Liberal Education: Tom Wiscombe on Archinect Sessions One-to-One #14</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Take a peek at Tom Wiscombe's "underground" Old Bank District Museum scheme for L.A.</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Moscow New NCCA Entry by Tom Wiscombe Design</a></li></ul> SANAA's Grace Farms “River” building wins latest MCHAP Justine Testado 2016-10-19T23:00:00-04:00 >2016-10-20T12:41:10-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="433" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The verdict is out! <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">SANAA</a>'s meandering Grace Farms &ldquo;River&rdquo; project has won the second Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize, as announced by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">IIT College of Architecture</a> Dean Wiel Arets and MCHAP Director Dirk Denison during a ceremony tonight at the S.R. Crown Hall in Chicago. First awarded <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">in 2014</a>, the biennial MCHAP is IIT's way of illuminating the most distinguished architectural projects built in the Americas. Projects for the second edition had to be completed between January 2014 and December 2015.</p><p>As part of their prize package, SANAA founders Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa will be appointed as MCHAP Chair at IIT Architecture Chicago for the following academic year and will receive up to $50,000 to fund research and a collaborative publication with the school.</p><p><img alt="" src=""></p><p>SANAA won over an international group of finalists that included Michael Maltzan, Grafton Architects, and Patkau Architects + Kearns Mancini Architects, to name a few (projects pictured in photo gallery below).</p><p>The River has co...</p> NYC breaks ground on One Vanderbilt, its second tallest tower DianePham 2016-10-19T11:41:00-04:00 >2016-10-24T22:29:39-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="365" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Designed by the tall tower pros at Kohn Pedersen Fox Architects, One Vanderbilt will rise to become the second tallest tower in NYC and the tallest tower in Midtown. However, unlike the city&rsquo;s other skyscraper additions noted for their slim silhouettes, this tower will be a behemoth occupying a full block between Vanderbilt and Madison avenues and East 42nd and East 43rd streets; the site is also directly adjacent to Grand Central Terminal.</p></em><br /><br /><p>On Tuesday morning, developer SL Green held an official groundbreaking ceremony for the KPF-designed One Vanderbilt.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The tower, which will rise&nbsp;1,401 feet when completed in 2020, will be New York City's second tallest, and one of its largest with more than 1.6 million square feet of office space distributed across 58 stories.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>One Vanderbilt will also occupy an entire city block,&nbsp;bound by Vanderbilt and Madison avenues and East 42nd and East 43rd streets. Notably, the site is directly adjacent to Grand Central Terminal.</p> Peter Zumthor didn't like his own "conventional renderings" for LACMA (and will release new images) Nicholas Korody 2016-10-18T18:40:00-04:00 >2016-10-24T22:28:35-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="304" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>&ldquo;They were conventional renderings, which I personally don't like so much," Peter Zumthor states in an interview with <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">CLADnews</a>, referring to the widely-criticized <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">renderings</a> of his proposed building for LACMA that were released in August. Relating that the renderings were created strictly for the purposes of an <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">environmental review</a>, Zumthor says his team is working on new images, made by photographing models (Zumthor is known to prefer models to digital renderings). &ldquo;The models allow us to take pictures with natural daylight, the light of the sun, which makes a lot of difference,&rdquo; he explains. &ldquo;These will explain the building better.&rdquo;</p><p>Elsewhere in the interview, Zumthor describes his plans in his typical spiritual language: &ldquo;You&rsquo;ll have this almost sacred, sublime kind of experience, but I would also like to accommodate the profane, the dirty, the normal, the everyday.&rdquo; He also employs a forestial analogy to describe the placement of art in the proposed museum, which eschews traditio...</p> Javier Senosiain's low-income "bio-architecture" housing proposal Julia Ingalls 2016-10-18T14:26:00-04:00 >2016-10-24T22:25:45-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="330" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Forming a closer, more harmonious bond between humanity and nature is the underlying goal of Javier Senosiain's organic or so-called "bio-architecture." His buildings often take the shape of organic forms--in one case, mythic serpent Quetzalcoatl--while simultaneously harvesting rainwater and providing natural shade and ventilation, among other attributes. The Mexican architect and professor at <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">UNAM</a> has a retrospective exhibition at The Palace of Fine Arts in Mexico City displaying his buildings, including a proposed low-income housing complex which breaks away from the cram'em'in monolithic housing milleu and instead creates a walkable, livable village. Check out this <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">CCTV-America</a> video profiling Senosiain and his work:</p> MONU #25 looks at Independent Urbanism MAGAZINEONURBANISM 2016-10-17T12:28:00-04:00 >2016-10-21T01:19:05-04:00 <img src="" width="520" height="700" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>A city in a country that recently gained independence is likely to undergo processes of radical transformation and massive restructuring and re-imagining that are not only societal, political, and economic in nature, but can also impact the planning system of a city and influence its built-up environment.</p></em><br /><br /><p>A city in a country that recently gained independence is likely to undergo processes of radical transformation and massive restructuring and re-imagining that are not only societal, political, and economic in nature, but can also impact the planning system of a city and influence its built-up environment. <em> <strong>Jasna Mariotti</strong></em> makes this quite clear in her contribution to<strong> MONU</strong>, entitled <strong>"What Ever Happened to Skopje?"</strong>. This new issue of our magazine deals with various phenomena impacting cities of countries that became newly<em><strong> independent</strong></em> which we call <strong>"Independent Urbanism"</strong>. She shows how the centre of Skopje in Macedonia has been remodeled according to an image of the city that never existed as such. Obviously, many<em><strong> "independent" cities</strong></em> are facing major struggles and difficulties in finding their new identity that usually have a lot to do with the fact that the<em> "birth of a country"</em> is a contested process often involving political turmoil, institutional instability, and economic turbulence...</p> Watch David Adjaye and James Turrell discuss light, space, and architecture Alexander Walter 2016-10-14T18:40:00-04:00 >2016-10-16T23:01:08-04:00 <img src="" width="640" height="359" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Last week, the White House held its very own arts and culture festival in D.C., South by South Lawn (SXSL). Organizers arranged a list of panel discussions and programs that brought together a diverse troupe of creatives for a "festival of ideas, art, and action.&rdquo; SXSL kicked off with a conversation between illustrious light artist James Turrell and award-winning architect David Adjaye, which was streamed live on The Creators Project&rsquo;s Facebook Page.</p></em><br /><br /><p><em>"Over the course of their chat, which was moderated by LACMA director Michael Govan,&nbsp;the two artists unpacked their general philosophies on art, light, space, and culture, and discussed some of the influences that have driven their processes and works."</em></p><p></p><p>Video via <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">The Creators Project</a>.</p><p>Similar stories in the Archinect news:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">David Adjaye on Designing a Museum That Speaks a Different Language</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">David Adjaye is releasing a vinyl record with his brother</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Light Perception Manipulation: The Future of Architecture</a></li></ul> Airbnb adds a Frank Lloyd Wright home, the Cooke House Julia Ingalls 2016-10-13T20:54:00-04:00 >2016-10-16T23:00:10-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="320" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>There are dozens of Frank Lloyd Wright houses across the country that fans of the architect can visit. There are a handful that can be rented. There is only one where you can sleep overnight for $148, which includes a personal guided tour by the 90-year-old owner and breakfast in a Wright-designed &ldquo;great room.&rdquo; The Cooke House in Virginia Beach, Va., built in 1959, is one of Wright&rsquo;s last commissioned works.</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For more on Frank Lloyd Wright:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Lloyd Wright's LA Samuel-Novarro House for sale</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">When 'Frank Lloyd Wright' and 'historic designation' are holding back your home&rsquo;s value, what&rsquo;s a seller to do?</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New Jersey&rsquo;s Oldest and Largest Frank Lloyd Wright House Listed for $2.2M</a></li></ul> Perkins + Will proposes 80-story timber skyscraper in Chicago Julia Ingalls 2016-10-13T13:56:00-04:00 >2016-10-17T09:37:23-04:00 <img src="" width="620" height="521" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>As part of its ongoing Riverline community project, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Perkins + Will</a> has proposed an entirely conceptual 80-story, 300 unit residential skyscraper made from timber called the River Beech Tower.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Announced 145 years after the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, this proposed tower would feature a massive central atrium and an aluminum veneer over the exposed diagonal lattice timber beams. While engineers say it is structurally possible, Perkins + Will is currently trying to figure out just how much it would cost to build.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>The River Beech Tower distinguishes itself by being one of the tallest wooden structures currently proposed; for a round-up of other tall wooden structures, take a look at these recent news stories:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Future sustainable skyscrapers will be made of...wood?</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Rise of the wooden skyscrapers: "Where all you need is a giant allen key to put it together."</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Two wooden towers to rise in Bordeaux</a></li></ul> Landmarks reveals new renderings for Studio Gang's Natural History Museum expansion project Alyssa Alimurung 2016-10-12T11:23:00-04:00 >2016-10-14T00:06:42-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="304" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>In light of the Landmarks Preservation Commission's approval of Jeanne Gang's expansion plan for the American Museum of Natural History, the Commission has revealed a slew of new renderings, which show the $325 million project from various angles, as well as new views of the surrounding parkland. Chairwoman Meenakshi Srinivasan referred to the new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education and Innovation as a &ldquo;stunning piece of architecture&rdquo; and an &ldquo;absolutely wonderful addition.&rdquo;</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p> One-to-One #41 with Deborah Berke Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-10T14:58:00-04:00 >2016-10-13T23:49:33-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="421" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The small town of Columbus, Indiana is packed with the works of famous modernist architects, but unlike cities like New York or Chicago, Columbus&rsquo;s pedigree isn&rsquo;t so often brought into the national architectural discourse. <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Exhibit Columbus</a>, a new symposium and exhibition happening annually in the city, is hoping to change that.</p><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Deborah Berke</a>, architect and dean at Yale, has worked extensively in Indiana and was a keynote speaker at this year's inaugural Exhibit Columbus symposium. She joined me on the podcast to reflect on the local and regional influences of Columbus, Indiana, and the impact they've had on her career.</p><p>Listen to&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">One-to-One</a>&nbsp;#41 with&nbsp;<strong>Deborah Berke</strong>:</p><ul><li><strong>iTunes</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Click here to listen&nbsp;and subscribe to the new&nbsp;"Archinect Sessions One-to-One" podcast</a></li><li><strong>SoundCloud</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">click here to follow Archinect</a></li><li><strong>RSS</strong>: subscribe with any of your favorite podcasting apps via our RSS feed:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"></a></li><li><strong>Download</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">this episode</a></li></ul><p></p><p>Listen to our <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Sessions podcast about Exhibit Columbus</a>&nbsp;for more bac...</p> Koolhaas speaks at the GSD: architecture is "clearly dedicated to political correctness" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-07T13:05:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T16:02:41-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="975" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>"I see architecture as almost a political work" [...] &ldquo;We are in a radically divided world&rdquo; in which &ldquo;architecture is not dealing with those political issues in a really sophisticated way,&rdquo; [...] &ldquo;I think that both the art world and the architecture world &hellip; [are] pretty intolerant in terms of engaging&rdquo; with political worlds beyond Western democracies."</p></em><br /><br /><p>More recent news from Rem and OMA:</p><ul><li><a title="OMA's plans for Axel Springer building officially released" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">OMA's plans for Axel Springer building officially released</a></li><li><a title="Watch live: Rem Koolhaas is moderating a 12-hour marathon of interviews on the future of Europe" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Watch live: Rem Koolhaas is moderating a 12-hour marathon of interviews on the future of Europe</a></li><li><a title="OMA's hyper Corb" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">OMA's hyper Corb</a></li><li><a title="To thrive post-Zaha, Koolhaas says ZHA should emulate high fashion brands" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">To thrive post-Zaha, Koolhaas says ZHA should emulate high fashion brands</a></li><li><a title='"The first major architect who disconnected the profession completely from angst": Rem on Bjarke' href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"The first major architect who disconnected the profession completely from angst": Rem on Bjarke</a></li></ul> Steven Holl's Visual Arts Building opens Oct. 7th at University of Iowa Julia Ingalls 2016-10-06T19:34:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T23:09:37-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="433" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>On Friday October 7th, Steven Holl and&nbsp;Senior Partner Chris McVoy will be on hand to officially open the firm's Visual Arts Building for the University of Iowa, which in addition to being the only building in the United States that uses an integrated hydronic radiant heating and cooling system in combination with a cast-in-place "bubble deck" (thereby eliminating the need to cool or heat air mechanically), is simply gorgeous.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>In a signature Steven Holl move, the interior is illuminated by&nbsp;seven vertical cutouts that are defined by the slide and jostle of the four floors against one another. This shifting dynamic creates opportunities for a series of balconies and informal working spaces.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Check out our conversation with Steven Holl from earlier this week:</p><p></p><p>For the latest on Steven Holl:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">"A Dance for Architecture": A conversation with Steven Holl</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Steven Holl designs "concave response" lighting for new visual arts building</a></li></ul> OMA's plans for Axel Springer building officially released Julia Ingalls 2016-10-06T13:20:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T23:03:48-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="459" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>OMA's Axel Springer building, which received the official launch from its namesake company today, visually confronts the disparate nature of modern office work. The 30-foot tall atrium with 3D facade elements creates a stage for unscripted interaction, while the more discreet sections of the building provide focused, quiet working space for 3,500 employees. The building will also feature a publicly-accessible park on its top.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>As Rem Koolhaas noted, &ldquo;Over the years, Berlin has been a profound source of inspiration, and with Axel Springer we are thrilled to continue our long engagement with this city.<br>We are lucky to have a client who views architecture as an instrument of change, and with this building, we hope to address a central dilemma of the contemporary office: as computer-based work has become largely intangible and silent, how can people effectively<br>communicate in a workspace which fosters both concentration and vigorous interaction?&rdquo;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For more on the Axel Springer building:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">OMA wi...</a></li></ul> Bing Thom dies at age 75 Nicholas Korody 2016-10-04T16:58:00-04:00 >2016-10-10T18:50:42-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="650" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Bing Thom, the lauded Canadian architect, died of a brain aneurysm at age 75 while on a trip to Hong Kong, the city of his birth.</p><p>Thom was one of Canada's most admired architects. He was awarded the Order of Canada, the Golden Jubilee Medal, the RAIC Medal, the Margolese Prize, as well as honorary degrees from Simon Fraser University and the University of British Columbia.</p><p>Thom studied architecture at the University of British Columbia and the University of California, Berkeley. He worked for Arthur Erickson and Fumihiko Maki before opening his own firm in 1981, Bing Thom Architects.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Some of the most notable projects by Bing Thom Architects are the Central City plaza, the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, the Aberdeen Centre, and the Sunset Community Centre&mdash;all in British Columbia, where Thom lived and worked. Bing Thom Architects also built in the United States, China, Spain, and the United Kingdom.</p><p>&ldquo;Bing believed architecture transcends the building, to shine its light onto its sur...</p> One-to-One #40 with Steven Holl Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-10-03T15:01:00-04:00 >2016-10-09T23:37:20-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="421" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Steven Holl is globally renowned for monumental works that specifically invoke light, color and porosity in both programmatic and aesthetic ways. Holl can also be thought of as an artist&rsquo;s architect&mdash;his firm has done work for many arts institutions, he methodically sketches his projects in watercolors, and his style is heavily influenced by art practice and theory. He&rsquo;s also very interested in the phenomenology of architecture&mdash;how it&rsquo;s sensed by humans, and its impact on our existence.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>We spoke in a totally unremarkable conference room at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, the day before Holl was scheduled to give a keynote presentation for the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture</a>&rsquo;s conference.</p><p>Listen to&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">One-to-One</a>&nbsp;#40 with <strong>Steven Holl</strong>:</p><ul><li><strong>iTunes</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Click here to listen&nbsp;and subscribe to the new&nbsp;"Archinect Sessions One-to-One" podcast</a></li><li><strong>SoundCloud</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">click here to follow Archinect</a></li><li><strong>RSS</strong>: subscribe with any of your favorite podcasting apps via our RSS feed:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"></a></li></ul> Editor's Picks #455 Nam Henderson 2016-10-03T09:09:00-04:00 >2016-10-03T13:46:36-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="383" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Amelia Taylor-Hochberg</a> featured <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Orhan Ayy&uuml;ce</a>&rsquo;s&nbsp;interview with "The Wire" actor Bob Wisdom from <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">LA Forum's summer issue, in Screen/Print #45</a>.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Therein, the two spoke of the show&rsquo;s depiction of race and crime in American cities, as well as the actor&rsquo;s own observations on east vs. west coast urbanisms.</p><p>Plus, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Julia Ingalls</a> reviewed &lsquo;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Eero Saarinen: The Architect Who Saw the Future</a>&rsquo; an "<em>intimate, luscious documentary portrait of Eero Saarinen</em>".&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Donna Sink</a> was a&nbsp;bit surprisingly, "<em>Feeling, very very conflicted about this entire article and film, but I do very much want to see it. That said, Eliel is my favorite Saarinen. With great &nbsp;respect to Eero's incredible body of work, I just prefer Eliel's focus on craft.</em>"</p><p><br><strong>News</strong><br>MoMA's chief curator of architecture and design, Martino Stierli, was on <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">One-to-One #38</a>.&nbsp;<strong>LiMX</strong> was not impressed "<em>nothing he is saying is particularly interesting or doesn't sound half-hearted corporate speak. Generally zzzzzzz. Amelia seems more up on arch curation than he...Berg...</em></p> Paulo Mendes da Rocha wins RIBA Royal Gold Medal Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-09-29T14:11:00-04:00 >2016-10-09T17:17:29-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="502" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>Paulo Mendes da Rocha is attracting international recognition once again as he continues to rack up top-tier lifetime achievement awards this year. [...] Awarded since 1848 and approved by the Queen of England, the Gold Medal is awarded to an individual or a group of people who have significantly influenced &ldquo;the advancement of architecture either directly or indirectly&rdquo;. da Rocha is the second Brazilian architect to win the accolade, joining Oscar Niemeyer who won it in 1998.</p></em><br /><br /><p>Paulo Mendes da Rocha is most known for his work establishing what would become Brazilian Brutalism. From Bustler:</p><p><em>Spearheading the Brutalist movement in his native Sao Paulo,&nbsp;da Rocha is credited for transforming the city&nbsp;with his numerous cultural buildings, which are typically designed in&nbsp;exposed concrete&nbsp;and rough finishes.&nbsp;Born in 1928, da Rocha's architecture career kicked off&nbsp;at a young age when he won the competition to&nbsp;design the gymnasium in the Paulistano Athletics Club (pictured [below]) at&nbsp;age&nbsp;29.</em></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>On the occasion of da Rocha's win, RIBA President and chair of the selection committee Jane Duncan said, "Mendes da Rocha&rsquo;s work typifies the architecture of 1950s Brazil &ndash; raw, chunky and beautifully &lsquo;brutal&rsquo; concrete.&rdquo; Some of his most notable Brazilian projects being: Saint Peter Chapel (1987) [below], the Brazilian Sculpture Museum MuBE (1988), Patriach Plaza (1992-2002), the Pinacoteca do Estado gallery (1993) [second below] and the FIESP Cultural Center (1997).</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>da Rocha exp...</p> "Great brutalist buildings, it turns out, have soul" Julia Ingalls 2016-09-29T13:27:00-04:00 >2016-10-09T17:17:22-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="270" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In this thoughtful ode to the unexpected charms of brutalism, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Felix Salmon</a> explores why the formerly nightmarish architectural style is experiencing a renaissance, or at least a renewed appreciation. Salmon's observation that ubiquitous, unimaginative glass towers have replaced brutalism as the new hated icon of class strife is ace:</p><p>"The international style evolved, and not well. What used to be aspirational started becoming an in-your-face statement of conspicuous consumption. The gauche gaudiness of was embraced not only where you might expect it (the Wynn towers of Las Vegas, say), but also in places with real history, such as New York City. Go to Columbus Circle today, for instance, and you&rsquo;ll see Christian de Portzamparc&rsquo;s billionaire condos at <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">One57</a> face off against 'a 1950s international style glass skyscraper in a 1980s gold lame party dress,' as Muschamp described&nbsp;the Trump International Hotel. Such erections generate almost as much hatred today as the worst mistakes of brut...</p> Needle exchange: a look at Herzog & de Meuron's transformative "needle" tower development in DTLA's arts district Julia Ingalls 2016-09-29T12:56:00-04:00 >2016-10-02T21:24:12-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="628" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The name of Herzog and de Meuron's proposed new development for downtown Los Angeles' <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">arts district</a>, 6 AM, seems like an hour/mindset that most of its current residents experience only because they stayed up much too late. But no one can stop the dawn of high-concept gentrification from breaking all over the district of former abandoned warehouses, especially when that concept promises to embody the so-called "DNA"of Los Angeles.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>According to an <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">article by Frances Anderton</a>, de Meuron purposefully nixed medium height buildings from 6 AM's design in favor of nose-bleed high rises and squat, table-like mixed-use structures, as this was reflective of how he views Los Angeles:</p><p>&ldquo;The high rise for us is important to make a difference between the low and the high because I think this is a part of specificity of Los Angeles.&nbsp;It&rsquo;s either flat or it&rsquo;s high. You don&rsquo;t have in between&nbsp;bulky&nbsp;buildings. So (we&rsquo;d) rather do extremely low and then you go higher. (The towers are)&nbsp;needle like &mdash; it shows...</p> Lloyd Wright's LA Samuel-Novarro House for sale Nicholas Korody 2016-09-28T13:38:00-04:00 >2016-10-07T01:12:08-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="433" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The Samuel Novarro House in Los Angeles, designed by Lloyd Wright, the son of Frank Lloyd Wright, has just been put up for sale. Built in 1928, the Art Deco house has been restored and comes with original Wrightian accents throughout, such as oxidized copper accents.</p><p>Located in ritzy &ldquo;the Oaks&rdquo; neighborhood of Los Feliz, the home has a stunning pool and equally lovely landscaping. The 3-bedroom, 3-bath house also comes equipped with a recently restored kitchen. The house is listed for&nbsp;$4.295 million and was previously sold for $3.8 million.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>[Correction] Originally this article stated the architect of this house was Frank Lloyd Wright. It was Frank Lloyd Wright's son, Lloyd Wright.</p><p>More images in the gallery.</p><p>For more on the Wright family, check out these articles:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Frank Lloyd Wright puts his foot down in 'a tribute to the pluck of a salesman'</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">When 'Frank Lloyd Wright' and 'historic designation' are holding back your home&rsquo;s value, what&rsquo;s a seller to do?</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">New Jersey&rsquo;s Oldest and Largest Frank...</a></li></ul> National Building Museum selects Studio Gang to design 2017 "Summer Block Party" installation Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-09-28T13:37:00-04:00 >2016-10-07T01:41:13-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="433" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Studio Gang has worked with the museum before, on its 2003&nbsp;<em>Masonry Variations&nbsp;</em>exhibition and as a part of the 2009&nbsp;<em>Transforming Skylines and Communities</em>&nbsp;series. While designs for the installation won't be fleshed out until early 2017, it will most likely follow in the playful, accessible style of previous Summer Block Party installations by <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">BIG</a>, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Snarkitecture</a>, and most recently, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">James Corner Field Operations</a>.</p><p>The museum's aim is for the designers to create "innovative, interactive experiences that temporarily transform the Museum&rsquo;s historic home and challenge visitor perceptions of the built environment." Studio Gang's appointment to next year's installation comes on the heels of the closing of&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">James Corner Field Operations' "ICEBERGS" pavilion</a>&nbsp;earlier this month.</p><p>Related on Archinect:</p><ul><li><a title="Jeanne Gang wins Architect of the Year in 2016's Women in Architecture Awards" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Jeanne Gang wins Architect of the Year in 2016's Women in Architecture Awards</a></li><li><a title="A peek at Jeanne Gang's Flintstones-esque addition to the Museum of Natural History" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">A peek at Jeanne Gang's Flintstones-esque addition to the Museum of Natural History</a></li><li><a title="Jeanne Gang and the Greening of Chicago" href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Jeanne Gang and the Greening of Chicago</a></li><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Thom...</a></li></ul> Salk Institute to be refurbished by The Getty Conservation Institute Julia Ingalls 2016-09-27T14:38:00-04:00 >2016-10-07T01:07:58-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="352" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Fungal biofilm and water sealant failure have added a black patina to the Salk Institute's iconic teak paneling, making the material vulnerable to decay. In order to save what is considered to be one of the world's finest architectural projects (and coolest structural alignment of the sunset save for perhaps <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Manhattanhenge</a>), the Getty Conservation Institute undertook three years of careful study and is now ready to start implementing those improvements. &nbsp;</p><p>According to Getty Conservation Institute project specialist Sara Lardinois, &ldquo;The GCI sought to address issues on a long-term basis while preserving cultural significance and addressing the needs of those managing the site. Our aim was to help the Salk Institute incorporate a conservation approach into its overall site management at a critical point in the building&rsquo;s history&mdash;the 50-year mark often coincides with the need for a first major repair in modern buildings.&rdquo;</p><p>For more on all things Louis Kahn:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Kimbell&rsquo;s $135 Million Expansion ...</a></li></ul> Grounded Research: Alvin Huang of Synthesis Design + Architecture on bringing computational design to life, on Archinect Sessions #82 Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2016-09-22T17:15:00-04:00 >2016-10-17T17:04:23-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="421" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Alvin Huang</a>, founder and principal of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Synthesis Design + Architecture</a> in Los Angeles, joins us to talk about growing his practice into the award-winning firm it is today. Alvin dips back into his time in London, going to school at the AA and working with Zaha, and shares the terror and excitement that is starting your own firm. We also discuss taking criticism on social media, firm/teaching/life balance, and computation's role in design.</p><p>This past August, Synthesis received the <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Presidential Honoree Emerging Practice Award from&nbsp;AIA | LA</a> &ndash; check out their work <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">here</a>.&nbsp;</p><p>Listen to&nbsp;episode 82 of&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"><strong>Archinect Sessions</strong></a>, "Grounded Research":</p><ul></ul><ul><li><strong>iTunes</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Click here to listen</a>, and click the "Subscribe" button below the logo to automatically download new episodes.</li><li><strong>Apple Podcast App (iOS)</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="pcast://" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">click here to subscribe</a></li><li><strong>SoundCloud</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">click here to follow Archinect</a></li><li><strong>RSS</strong>: subscribe with any of your favorite podcasting apps via our RSS feed:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank"></a></li><li><strong>Download</strong>:&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">this episode</a></li></ul><p></p><p><strong>Shownotes:</strong></p><p>The Greg Lynn Show...</p> Norman Foster reimagines global infrastructure strategies in new essay Julia Ingalls 2016-09-22T13:36:00-04:00 >2016-09-26T23:32:26-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="364" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Back in May, Foster + Partners unveiled their design for the Droneport, a modular shell-like structure that is constructed with local labor from earthen bricks and thin compressed tiles to create loading areas for food and medical-aid bearing transport drones. A version of the Droneport was built at this year's <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Venice Biennale</a> (which is open until November 27th).&nbsp;Now, in the freshly unveiled <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">thematic supplement to the&nbsp;</a><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">2015 Annual Statistical Report on United Nations Procurement,</a> Norman Foster has written an essay which builds upon the idea of <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Buckminster Fuller</a>'s "trim tab" to help foster enormous change in Africa and other countries with relatively small, if holistically conceived, gestures such as the Droneport.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Norman writes: "There is a moral imperative to provide more globally available energy while seeking to conserve its consumption. The answer to this apparent paradox is to adopt&nbsp;a holistic approach to the design of sustainable communities in which the infrastructure and indi...</p> Introducing Bjarke Ingels' floating student housing, "Urban Rigger" Julia Ingalls 2016-09-22T12:48:00-04:00 >2016-10-17T17:04:23-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="443" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Bjarke Ingels has found the elusive silver lining in global sea level rise and the European affordable housing crisis in the form of "Urban Rigger," a series of inexpensive student housing complexes that are designed to float in the sea, especially in those cities which have dense urban cores next to the waterfront. The idea here is to provide students with affordable digs that are close to class while simultaneously making the most out of changing climate conditions and post-industrial port repurposing. The first complete Urban Rigger has already been assembled in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Copenhagen</a>.</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>According to an article in <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">FastCompany</a>, "Each unit, which can house 12 students at once, is composed of modular shipping containers. These modules are powered by a photovoltaic array and use a heat-exchange system that draws upon the thermal mass of water to warm and cool the interiors. Meanwhile, an aerogel developed by NASA insulates the interiors."</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>For the latest on Bjarke Ingels:</p><ul><li><a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Play "Arkinoid" arcade on BIG...</a></li></ul> Editor's Picks #454 Nam Henderson 2016-09-22T00:17:00-04:00 >2016-09-26T23:15:11-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="383" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Responding to Brexit, <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Eleanor Marshall</a>&nbsp;considered <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">five buildings designed by European architects working in the UK from 1973 until 2016</a>; the lifespan of the UK&rsquo;s membership of the European Union.&nbsp;</p><p><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>"<em>If in the next few years major change hinders the eclecticism that the UK currently has we may be left with the tedious offspring of New London Vernacular and not much else.</em>"</p><p>Plus,&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Julia Ingalls</a>&nbsp;looked at the example set by&nbsp;<a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">7 famous architectural dropouts and autodidacts</a>.&nbsp;<strong>Olaf Design Ninja_ </strong>&nbsp;quipped "<em>pales in comparison to the Harvard drop-out list</em>".<br>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>News</strong><br>For those confused about the Guggenheim Helsinki <strong>discoverfinland</strong> <a href="" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">clarified</a> -</p><p>"<em>The whole project has been rejected twice. Helsinki locals are vocally opposed to it, about 60/40, local govt is opposed to it, and now it has been completely ruled out at a national level. Unfortunately, some of those who are in favour are also journalists, which leads to the international community thinking this is an actual issue. It isn't. In 2017 the reserve t...</em></p> David Adjaye on Designing a Museum That Speaks a Different Language b3tadine[sutures] 2016-09-22T00:11:00-04:00 >2016-09-26T23:21:31-04:00 <img src="" width="650" height="449" border="0" title="" alt="" /><em><p>I was completely moved by the corona motif. It seemed like a way to start to tell a story that moves from one continent, where people were taken, along with their cultures, and used as labor, then contributed towards making another country and new cultures. That history then continues in the decorative patterning of those panels.</p></em><br /><br /><p><img title="" alt="" src=""><br><br><img title="" alt="" src=""></p><p>Adjaye.</p>