Archinect - Features 2014-10-23T15:55:47-04:00 http://archinect.com/features/article/104803779/aftershock-3-brains-and-the-city AfterShock #3: Brains and the City Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-07-24T10:30:00-04:00 >2014-07-28T18:36:47-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/j6/j6pdgvke18am89pv.jpg" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Navel-gazing has become a data-driven sport. We are awash in technology that allows us to track our own activities, and then take responsibility for that scrutiny, holding us accountable for calories consumed or credit cards exhausted. The quantified-self movement can be a sandstorm of uselessness, or it can sublimate into constructive action. If we try to focus our navel-gaze to better understand ourselves, it seems imminent that such scrutiny will next focus on the brain.</p> http://archinect.com/features/article/101180316/screen-print-18-new-suburbanisms-by-judith-k-de-jong Screen/Print #18: "New SubUrbanisms" by Judith K. De Jong Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2014-06-09T10:16:00-04:00 >2014-06-16T22:39:59-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/i9/i99mwcrc7wkzh6bd.jpg" width="514" height="772" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The American suburbs no longer exist as physically and conceptually peripheral to the downtown, the central consciousness of urban development. According to <a href="http://www.arch.uic.edu/faculty/dejong.php" target="_blank">Judith K. De Jong</a>&rsquo;s new book,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/New-SubUrbanisms-Judith-De-Jong/dp/0415642175" target="_blank">New SubUrbanisms</a>, </em>the suburbs'&nbsp;mainstream designation as places of seclusion, domesticity, superficiality, and safety (set in comparison to their accompanying denser urban downtowns), has collapsed in the wake of a feedback loop between central city and suburbia.</p> http://archinect.com/features/article/97029910/op-ed-response-to-screen-print-6-monu-s-greater-urbanism Op-Ed: Response to Screen/Print #6, MONU's "Greater Urbanism" Petros Phokaides 2014-04-07T17:23:00-04:00 >2014-04-14T19:07:51-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/fs/fs6kfxcfvzdeuznr.jpg" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Greater urbanism, the focus of the latest issue of <em>MONU</em> magazine, is a term aiming to describe urban phenomena and strategies associated with cities expanding their territories (&ldquo;greater&rdquo; as bigger and more complex); and/or increasing their economic or symbolic power (&ldquo;Greater&rdquo; as grander). Revisiting the magazine&rsquo;s rich content, profiled in <a href="http://archinect.com/features/article/91708100/screen-print-6-monu-s-greater-urbanism" target="_blank"><em>Screen/Print</em> #6</a>, this review, by Petros Phokaides,&nbsp;Loukas Triantis and Iris Polyzos, aims to offer critical insights on some of the challenges faced by urbanism today, and a quick reflection on current dynamics/discussions on the future of cities.</p> http://archinect.com/features/article/37942258/contours-urbanism-housing-and-the-economy CONTOURS: Urbanism, Housing, and the Economy Sherin Wing 2012-02-13T15:32:00-05:00 >2012-02-21T00:52:28-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/de/de7wj49bd50dg4w1.jpg" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> Two issues that effect everyone, whatever social, economic, and professional strata they occupy, are population and urban growth. What&rsquo;s more, ongoing shifts in population and urbanism across the world, especially in developing nations, have dramatically impacted the building industry. Housing and mixed-use projects in East Asia, Eastern Europe, and Latin America are rapidly increasing.</p>