Archinect - Features 2014-09-30T14:27:08-04:00 http://archinect.com/features/article/55285437/manhattanisms-ram-s-vs-rem Manhattanisms : RAM(s) vs. REM Alex Maymind 2012-08-14T20:00:00-04:00 >2014-01-25T01:46:53-05:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/6q/6qglz83d0quqdsaf.jpg" width="514" height="328" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><em>by Alex Maymind &amp; Matthew Persinger</em></p><p><em>(published in </em><a href="http://pidginmagazine.com/" target="_blank">Pidgin Magazine</a>: Issue 11<em>, Princeton University School of Architecture, p. 208-219.)</em></p><p>&ldquo;In other words, it&rsquo;s Stern&rsquo;s commonness as opposed to his rarity, that makes his work so significant.&rdquo; - Mark Jarzombek[1]</p><p>&ldquo;Pretending histories left and right, its contents are dynamic yet stagnant, recycled or multiplied as in cloning: forms search for function like hermit crabs looking for a vacant shell . . .&rdquo; - Rem Koolhaas, Junkspace[2]</p> http://archinect.com/features/article/2673501/5-projects-interview-3-matthew-persinger 5 Projects: Interview 3 - Matthew Persinger Alex Maymind 2011-04-12T19:21:00-04:00 >2012-09-26T18:27:28-04:00 <img src="http://cdn.archinect.net/images/514x/nr/nrl8tuw3kvsijac7.jpg" width="514" height="396" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p> 5 (student) Projects: is a group of projects completed at Yale University's School of Architecture by 5 young architects during their graduate education. Each of the 5 projects are sited in New Haven on or adjacent to Yale's campus. Each project focused on an institutional building, loosely defined by program, type and context. These commonalities became a framework for discussion that illuminated individual polemics and debate about experimentation in today's architectural landscape. Despite the initial appearance of diversity within the set, each architect sought to address a common set of ideas emerging at Yale and perhaps within the discourse of architecture at large. Primarily addressing the legacy of Postmodernism (in its various guises and forms), each sought an architecture that engaged historical memory, local context and an renewed concern for communication and legibility. Each was interested in an operable or speculative way to use history and its associated culturally ...</p>