Archinect - Features 2015-12-01T02:43:45-05:00 In tempestuous London, design leads the evolution: Archinect's report from the front lines of the London Design Festival Robert Urquhart 2015-11-03T13:20:00-05:00 >2015-11-15T23:22:44-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>London may currently be undergoing a regenerative process akin to heavyweight cosmetic surgery, but under its shiny new surface remains a cranky old soul. The surgery is not without complications: the lack of affordable housing makes mainstream news on a regular basis. <a href="" target="_blank">Gentrification</a>, displacement of communities and encroaching globalization where one size fits all, has brought about an identity crisis to this brisk and confident city.&nbsp;But despite this crisis, the creative industries that form the largely unwitting infantry for property developers march on. <a href="" target="_blank">The London Design Festival</a> is at the vanguard of this march.</p> Screen/Print #37: "S,M,L,XL" from the Journal of Architectural Education Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-10-20T14:04:00-04:00 >2015-11-05T17:32:07-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="660" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Approaching 70 years in publication, the <em><a href="" target="_blank">Journal of Architectural Education</a></em> is a foundational resource in the profession. As the peer-reviewed, biannual academic journal from the <a href="" target="_blank">Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture</a>, JAE seeks to provide a platform for discussion of issues relevant to architecture education and academia, while also gathering up the profession&rsquo;s diverse discursive threads in connection to architecture scholarship. Published to coincide annually with ACSA&rsquo;s national and regional conferences, our <strong><em>Screen/Print</em></strong> feature focuses on the October 2015 issue, volume 69: "<a href="" target="_blank">S,M,L,XL</a>"<em>.</em></p> Site/Context: Cupertino's rate of change Gary Garvin 2015-10-14T11:34:00-04:00 >2015-10-25T13:30:59-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="402" border="0" title="" alt="" /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> An interview with Bogotá-based Giancarlo Mazzanti Laura Amaya 2015-09-30T12:18:00-04:00 >2015-10-18T05:00:44-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="314" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><strong>Giancarlo Mazzanti</strong>&nbsp;is the Colombian architect behind such transformational works as the&nbsp;<a href="" target="_blank">Espa&ntilde;a Library in Medell&iacute;n</a>&nbsp;and El Porvenir Kindergarten in Bogot&aacute;. Founder and principal of El Equipo de Mazzanti, he has developed an innovative aesthetic based on high quality design as a catalyst for social change.</p> The Architecture Job Application Hints & Suggestions from Employers: Part II Julia Ingalls 2015-09-04T11:14:00-04:00 >2015-09-20T23:14:04-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="362" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>What is the best way to apply for an <a href="" target="_blank">architecture job</a>? We <a href="" target="_blank">once again</a> asked <a href="" target="_blank">employers</a> on Archinect to tell us what they look for in <a href="" target="_blank">job candidates</a>, including portfolio tips, desired software skills, and the best way to impress during an in-person interview.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Here&rsquo;s what&nbsp;we asked employers:</strong></p><ol><li>How important is it for applicants to grasp/articulate the underlying philosophy of the firm in their cover letter/application materials?</li><li>What software skills do you wish applicants to have?</li><li>How much work should an applicant include in their portfolio? Should that work be tailored to the specific types of projects the firm undertakes, or is it important to see a broad range of what the applicant can do?</li><li>How should an applicant prepare for the in-person interview process?</li><li>How important are references?</li><li>How important is your website, and the applicant's knowledge of your website, to the interview process?</li><li>What are the most common mistakes potential employees make on their applications?</li><li>Can you offer any other ...</li></ol> Screen/Print #36: Harvard Design Magazine's "Well, Well, Well" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-08-14T10:32:00-04:00 >2015-08-18T17:55:48-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="720" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>&ldquo;Well, Well, Well&rdquo;, the fortieth issue from the <em>Harvard&nbsp;Design Magazine,</em>&nbsp;explores the&nbsp;tricky business of designing for health, and provokes considerations on the flip-side of neglecting to do so.</p> Screen/Print #35: PennDesign's "LA+" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-07-23T17:58:00-04:00 >2015-08-08T19:38:49-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="585" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>It all comes back to the land. <em><strong><a href="" target="_blank">LA+</a></strong></em>, the new publication produced by the Landscape Architecture Department at the <a href="" target="_blank">University of Pennsylvania&rsquo;s School of Design</a>, places landscape architecture at the origin point of a diverse panoply of disciplines. Put out twice annually, <em>LA+</em>&#8203; features precisely curated content from an array of professions that all come to focus on the landscape.</p> Upstarts: Design, Bitches Julia Ingalls 2015-07-22T13:34:00-04:00 >2015-09-21T03:37:22-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>As the name suggests, <a href="" target="_blank"><strong>Design, Bitches</strong></a> is a synergy of creativity and earthiness. Combining a refined sense of order with playful humor, the Los Angeles-based firm founded by Catherine Johnson and Rebecca Rudolph distills the splendor of urban chaos in their graphic branding, art projects, and commercial and residential interiors.</p> A Studio of 4,500: Inside Gensler's Culture Julia Ingalls 2015-07-10T12:22:00-04:00 >2015-09-20T22:58:47-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The sun never sets on Gensler. One can visit their website and watch in real time as the bell curve of night fails to shadow all 46 of their office locations. Founded in 1965 by M. Arthur J. Gensler Jr., the firm has grown to <a href="" target="_blank">employ</a> over 4,500 people in 16 different countries. It&rsquo;s the kind of sprawling, vast enterprise that draws more analogies to <a href="" target="_blank">historic tea companies</a> than design firms. How can an architecture firm of this size maintain a unified studio culture? Or should it?</p> Screen/Print #34: KTISMA's "Lick Your Buildings" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-06-30T09:48:00-04:00 >2015-07-03T22:40:55-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="657" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Student-run, annual, peer-reviewed journal <a href="" target="_blank"><strong>KTISMA</strong></a>, from the <a href="" target="_blank">University of Oregon&rsquo;s School of Architecture and Allied Arts</a>, does not appear to have any specific agenda. Instead, it aims to poke and prod a diverse community of professional peers into writing on whichever facet of environmental discourse they can imagine &ndash; any amalgamation of architecture, design, art, and their respective rhetorics is fair game.</p> What's the hottest new job in architecture? Julia Ingalls 2015-06-25T13:27:00-04:00 >2015-07-03T17:29:59-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Architecture: it&rsquo;s not just glue gun burns and x-refs anymore. In an industry known for playing canary in the employment coalmine, architecture is once again experiencing a hiring boom. Additionally, thanks to changes in technology, both in design software and in the more general way people communicate online, several fields have either newly appeared or considerably expanded in architecturally-related work.&nbsp;In this series, we&rsquo;ll be spotlighting specific new careers within architecture, including a basic description, the ideal background you should have for this position, any particular software/tools you should master, and the most likely regions where you can find this type of work based on <a href="" target="_blank">Archinect's&nbsp;job board</a>.</p> Don't Be a Tool: Role of Software vs. Vision in Architectural Employment Julia Ingalls 2015-06-18T10:39:00-04:00 >2015-09-23T02:27:54-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>One must be smarter than the tools one is working with, but what exactly does that mean in a profession that increasingly relies on software initially developed for the aerospace industry? How important is it for a student to master <a href="" target="_blank">Rhino</a> or <a href="" target="_blank">REVIT</a> versus the intrinsic philosophy of great design itself? Most importantly, how does a student balance the need to become a high-end CAD monkey while developing creative thought?</p> What makes an artless museum? Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-06-16T11:00:00-04:00 >2015-08-31T15:30:58-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Architectural criticism that begins with &ldquo;it looks like [insert Platonic object here]&rdquo; is suspect at best, but the temptation to gamble with semiotic stickiness is too great: if I see a contraceptive sponge when I look at the new Broad Museum, I want to say that.</p> Is Twitter the architectural intern's unofficial labor union? Exposing the reality behind unpaid internships across borders and industries Julia Ingalls 2015-06-11T12:15:00-04:00 >2015-07-01T10:41:43-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Social media has been accused of being many things: a time-waster, an intelligence-leveler, a privacy-invader. However, in the field of architectural <a href="" target="_blank">employment</a>, social media has oddly become a kind of virtual worker&rsquo;s union, helping to expose unethical <a href="" target="_blank">hiring</a> practices. A recent leaked email from Japanese firm <a href="" target="_blank">SANAA</a> advertised an unpaid internship for three months consisting of 12-hour days, 6-7 days a week, with the intern providing his or her own computer and software. <a href="" target="_blank">Juan Herrera tweeted the email on March 23rd</a> and it quickly garnered extensive press coverage.</p> Op-Ed: Beyond Stars, Icons and Much More, by Patrik Schumacher Patrik Schumacher 2015-06-08T15:21:00-04:00 >2015-08-23T09:52:26-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="333" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In mid-April I had posted a note entitled "<a href="" target="_blank">In Defense of Stars and Icons</a>" on my Facebook page. This was <a href="" target="_blank">picked up and extensively commented on, here on Archinect</a>. I am thrilled about the lively debate that followed (in which I had participated as &lsquo;parametricist&rsquo;) and I am happy to get the opportunity to come back to this debate once more in this op-ed.</p> Screen/Print #33: the alternative history of Edith Farnsworth and her architect, from MIT's "Thresholds" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-06-06T12:53:00-04:00 >2015-06-14T19:59:34-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="746" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><a href="" target="_blank">MIT</a>&rsquo;s Department of Architecture is the oldest in the US, and its journal is comparably formidable. Known as <a href="" target="_blank"><em>Thresholds</em></a>, the peer-reviewed publication is issued annually, and not uncommonly features work by established leaders in architectural thought, associated with the school or not. It doesn&rsquo;t strive towards a single theoretical or conceptual framework as a whole, but unpacks a particular idea with each issue &ndash; featured here is &ldquo;<a href="" target="_blank">Scandalous</a>&rdquo;.</p> Screen/Print #32: NAAM's "On the Edge of Architecture" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-05-13T09:16:00-04:00 >2015-05-30T03:39:03-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="514" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In our scope of <a href="" target="_blank"><strong><em>Screen/Print</em>s</strong></a>, architectural writing runs the gamut from object-oriented and project-specific analysis, to the fantasy realm of future conjectures and other worlds. The pieces can&rsquo;t be generalized by topic or style, only by approach &ndash; taking on any genre with architecture as the protagonist. Our featured issue of <strong><em>NAAM</em></strong>, &ldquo;<a href="" target="_blank">On the Edge of Architecture</a>&rdquo;,<strong> </strong>embodies that spirit wholeheartedly.</p> Art + Architecture: Andreas Angelidakis between the monumental and the particular Nicholas Korody 2015-05-12T14:10:00-04:00 >2015-09-29T21:14:35-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="333" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Buoyantly imaginative yet grounded by a commitment to sociopolitical realism, the work of the Greek-born architect <a href="" target="_blank">Andreas Angelidakis</a>&nbsp;defies categorization. In fact, while he was trained as an architect at <a href="" target="_blank">SCI-Arc</a>, Angelidakis' work is perhaps better known in contemporary art circles than among architects. After all, Angelidakis exhibits in museums (and online) more than he builds. Yet his work, which takes the form of renderings, videos, sculptures, dioramas and installations, is visibly marked by an architectural sensibility. With near-manic intensity, Angelidakis&rsquo; work operates fluidly on the uneven terrain of the contemporary moment, invoking ecological disaster, digital and post-digital networks, economic crises, celebrity culture &ndash; often all at once. At the same time, specters of history &ndash; both imagined and real &ndash; never escape his expansive purview.</p> Architecture of the Anthropocene, Pt. 3: Getting Lost in the Ozone Nicholas Korody 2015-05-07T12:08:00-04:00 >2015-05-12T20:43:11-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="388" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>This is the third installment of the recurring feature&nbsp;<em>Architecture of the Anthropocene,&nbsp;</em>which explores the implications of the <a href="" target="_blank">Anthropocene thesis</a>&nbsp;for architecture. The <a href="" target="_blank">Anthropocene</a> is a contested name for "the era of geological time during which human activity is considered to be the dominant influence on the environment, climate, and ecology of the earth."</p><p>Prior installments can be found <a href="" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> Screen/Print #31: Dialectic III, "Dream of Building or the Reality of Dreaming" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-05-05T17:32:00-04:00 >2015-08-06T02:03:06-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="633" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The official publication of the <a href="" target="_blank">University of Utah&rsquo;s School of Architecture</a>, <a href="" target="_blank"><strong><em>Dialectic</em></strong></a> is an explicit extension of the discussions and issues taking place within the school. The annual publication seeks to add nuance and opposing viewpoints to content already being produced by students, culling the best of student work produced throughout the year, framed by an editorial response to the same issues the external architectural community is facing.</p> How Architects Can Help Nepal (And Learn From Past Disastrous Mistakes/Successes) Julia Ingalls 2015-04-30T18:20:00-04:00 >2015-05-10T04:48:01-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="308" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>April 25th&rsquo;s 7.8 magnitude earthquake in Nepal has razed entire villages, severely disrupted basic infrastructure, and is responsible for the loss of over 5,000 lives. According to The Guardian, the death toll may rise to as many <a href="" target="_blank">10,000 people</a>. Unfortunately, in the wake of natural disasters, the architectural community has traditionally waited out the initial emergency phase before lending aid. The embarrassing response to 2005&rsquo;s Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, in which thousands of refugees sweltered in the Superdome for days without ready access to running water, prompted organizations including the AIA to revamp their emergency-response guidelines. Now, architects are encouraged to immediately respond to a disaster.</p> Screen/Print #30: SOILED's "Cloudscrapers" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-03-31T09:01:00-04:00 >2015-04-08T18:30:38-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="766" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><a href="" target="_blank"><strong>SOILED</strong></a> is back, dirtier than ever. Our first-ever&nbsp;<a href="" target="_blank"><strong><em>Screen/Print</em></strong></a>&nbsp;featured <strong>SOILED'</strong>s <em><a href="" target="_blank">Windowscrapers</a></em>,&nbsp;and for its next issue, the Chicago-based publication devoted to making &ldquo;a mess of the built environment and the politics of space&rdquo; set it sights a bit higher up. After scraping the windows, it gazes to <em><a href="" target="_blank">Cloudscrapers</a></em>, centering its architectural storytelling into the upper reaches of our atmosphere.</p> Ghosts of Schindler's past haunt Renee Green's MAK Center exhibition Nicholas Korody 2015-03-24T12:10:00-04:00 >2015-04-02T22:51:17-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="369" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Where does an encounter with a work of architecture begin? There is the building as it first emerges on the horizon. Then the series of connected moments as you approach, that, like in a film, change according to variables of speed and distance, of the position of the subject in relation to the object. There is also the moment of crossing the threshold, the ambiguous line that demarcates inside from outside.</p> An open letter to Guest Lecture series Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-03-20T15:32:00-04:00 >2015-03-26T20:01:31-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> Screen/Print #28: PLACE-HOLDER's interview with Greg Lynn for Issue 1/2, "Afterschool" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-02-23T10:26:00-05:00 >2015-03-08T16:45:42-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="741" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>It&rsquo;s foolish to think of process as a straight-line; tangents, detours, dead-ends and roundabouts are the foundation of architecture's process, however immaculate its presentation. <a href="" target="_blank"><strong>PLACE-HOLDER</strong></a>, a publication out of the <a href="" target="_blank">Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design at the University of Toronto</a>, focuses on the messy preamble and sequels to architecture, publishing those fringes of architectural practice and study that otherwise might be sheared away.</p> UpStarts: Martha Read Architects Julia Ingalls 2015-02-20T09:48:00-05:00 >2015-02-22T20:41:03-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="855" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Founded in 2012 by former literature student and obituary writer Martha Read, UK-based Martha Read Architects is the distillation of multiple cultural sensitivities, honed over decades of teaching, writing, and working globally.</p><p><em><a href="" target="_blank"><strong>UpStarts</strong></a>&nbsp;is a series of features on the foundations of contemporary practice. It will have a global reach in which practices from Europe, North America, Asia, and beyond will be asked to address the work behind getting the work, and the effect of cultural contexts. The focus will be on how a practice is initiated and maintained. In many ways, the critical years of a fledgling design partnership is within the initial five years, after the haze and daze of getting it off the ground.&nbsp;<strong><a href="" target="_blank">UpStarts</a></strong>&nbsp;surveys the first years of practice as a tool for tracking the tactics of the rapidly evolving methods for sustaining a practice.</em></p> Oyler Wu Collaborative in ink, graphite and steel Anthony Morey 2015-02-09T11:22:00-05:00 >2015-03-02T23:25:40-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="685" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Painters paint, sculptors sculpt, and writers write, yet architects do not architect &ndash; they draw, model, and write. Architecture is one of the few creative fields that does not allow the artist to work in the medium where the final work will be produced. Yet Oyler Wu Collaborative makes productive use of that cognitive jump.</p> The State of Debt and the Price of Architecture #2 Nicholas Korody 2015-01-16T09:45:00-05:00 >2015-08-31T16:24:23-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="327" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Do you know anyone who is not a debtor, at least in some sense? The idea is practically unthinkable. To participate in modern life, one must take on debt: credit cards, housing loans, medical bills, education. Even cash is a form of debt, albeit normalized to the point that we no longer think of it as such. <em>State of Debt and the Price of Architecture </em>is a series that attempts to consider the particular situation of architecture student debt within a larger cultural and historical framework: to show just how strange (and untenable) the normal actually is.</p> The Age Of The Plastic Chimney: How Cookie-Cutter Homes Drove Me to Despair… And Away from the Profession Paul Keskeys 2014-12-19T10:28:00-05:00 >2015-01-02T15:23:56-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>A UK architect berates the state of residential development across The Pond, and asks the question: How can we rock the status quo?</p> Op-Ed: If Architecture Were Optimism; A Response to Michael Kimmelman's Critique of 1 WTC archiadventures 2014-12-01T11:38:00-05:00 >2014-12-05T22:49:46-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="333" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In the last year or so, reading or watching the news has become a game of roulette. Taking my chances, I scan pages or flip channels hastily in an attempt to avoid disturbing imagery and narrative in favor of landing on something meaningful and at least slightly optimistic.</p>