Archinect - Features 2015-11-29T05:43:28-05:00 Art + Architecture: Swipes and Changeups with Mike Nesbit Nicholas Korody 2015-11-25T14:12:00-05:00 >2015-11-27T04:02:09-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>"I'm always looking at things and taking them at face value," said Mike Nesbit, a Los Angeles-based architect and artist, as he leaned over the table and grabbed an empty glass to use as illustration. He turned the glass over in his hands several times causing the reflection of an overhead light to splinter and reform with each rotation. &ldquo;Surveying a found object,&rdquo; he continued, &ldquo;and trying to eliminate the predetermined meaning that I have in my hand.&rdquo;</p> "A Dance for Architecture": A conversation with Steven Holl Julia Ingalls 2015-11-20T13:31:00-05:00 >2015-11-24T13:29:16-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="354" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>As a 34-year old architect, Steven Holl was appointed to a full-time teaching position at Columbia University with barely any completed works to his name, based on the strengths of his publication <em>Pamphlet Architecture</em>, previous teaching stints at Syracuse University&nbsp;and the University of Pennsylvania, and his competition entries. But rather than settling into academia, Holl continued to hone his conceptual formulations to create real buildings that incorporate a signature use of color, a notion of &lsquo;poetry&rsquo; within physical places, and a constant refinement of his foundational architectural convictions.</p> Emotional tactility: Tom Kundig's latest "Works" Julia Ingalls 2015-11-17T11:45:00-05:00 >2015-11-24T00:44:13-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="321" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Tom Kundig has a few credits to his name: aside from a MacDowell Colony Fellowship, the Smithsonian&rsquo;s 2008 National Design Award in Architecture Design, and eleven national AIA awards, his firm <a href="" target="_blank">Olson Kundig</a> has also twice been named one of Fast Company&rsquo;s &ldquo;Top Ten Most Innovative Companies in Architecture.&rdquo; Now, the would-be geophysicist turned architect, known for his inventive blending of mechanics and aesthetics in private residences and public buildings alike, has a collection out by Princeton Architectural Press featuring his latest nine works, called&nbsp;<em>Tom Kundig: Works</em>.</p> The long and weirding road: a tour through Los Angeles urbanism in "Sidewalking" Julia Ingalls 2015-11-05T19:34:00-05:00 >2015-11-15T23:03:55-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="386" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Rarely do any two people share an identical Los Angeles. From the unsentimentality of Joan Didion to the romantic corruption of James Ellroy to the hyperbolic insight of Mike Davis, LA's urbanity is fundamentally idiosyncratic.&nbsp;<em>Sidewalking: Coming to Terms with Los Angeles</em>, written by Guggenheim Fellow and <em>Los Angeles Times</em> book critic David Ulin, recognizes and celebrates this disjunction. By richly layering history and personal observation, Ulin unspools the divergent threads of LA one walk at a time, exploring not only his relationship to the city, but the city's relationship to itself.</p> In tempestuous London, design leads the evolution: Archinect's report from the front lines of the London Design Festival Robert Urquhart 2015-11-03T13:20:00-05:00 >2015-11-15T23:22:44-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>London may currently be undergoing a regenerative process akin to heavyweight cosmetic surgery, but under its shiny new surface remains a cranky old soul. The surgery is not without complications: the lack of affordable housing makes mainstream news on a regular basis. <a href="" target="_blank">Gentrification</a>, displacement of communities and encroaching globalization where one size fits all, has brought about an identity crisis to this brisk and confident city.&nbsp;But despite this crisis, the creative industries that form the largely unwitting infantry for property developers march on. <a href="" target="_blank">The London Design Festival</a> is at the vanguard of this march.</p> The school of helpful knocks: the experiential pedagogy of Design Build Research Julia Ingalls 2015-10-21T16:05:00-04:00 >2015-11-02T23:28:16-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>In some veins of architecture pedagogy, there seems to be a movement towards new technology at the expense of hands-on construction techniques.&nbsp;In the opinion of architect <a href="" target="_blank">Michael Green</a> and creative entrepreneur Scott Hawthorn, these schools increasingly churn out graduates who are so moored in abstraction that they have very little practical ability. This is problematic in a field where clients and real, physical buildings often refuse to be abstract. Design Build Research (DBR), based in Vancouver, British Columbia, is Green and Hawthorn&rsquo;s solution to schools that isolate designers from the community for which they design.</p> Screen/Print #37: "S,M,L,XL" from the Journal of Architectural Education Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-10-20T14:04:00-04:00 >2015-11-05T17:32:07-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="660" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Approaching 70 years in publication, the <em><a href="" target="_blank">Journal of Architectural Education</a></em> is a foundational resource in the profession. As the peer-reviewed, biannual academic journal from the <a href="" target="_blank">Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture</a>, JAE seeks to provide a platform for discussion of issues relevant to architecture education and academia, while also gathering up the profession&rsquo;s diverse discursive threads in connection to architecture scholarship. Published to coincide annually with ACSA&rsquo;s national and regional conferences, our <strong><em>Screen/Print</em></strong> feature focuses on the October 2015 issue, volume 69: "<a href="" target="_blank">S,M,L,XL</a>"<em>.</em></p> The In Crowd: review of "Conversations with Architects: In the Age of Celebrity" Julia Ingalls 2015-10-16T11:17:00-04:00 >2015-10-24T23:59:44-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="340" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>What can one say about the celebrity architect that hasn't already been said, especially if the status itself arguably displaces thoughtful criticism? For former corporate interior designer turned international architectural curator Vladimir Belogolovsky, architectural celebrity is in the eye of the practitioner &ndash; and to that end, he has interviewed 30 of architecture's best known professionals about their work, their motivations, and their designs for the future in <em>Conversations with Architects: In the Age of Celebrity</em>.</p> Site/Context: Cupertino's rate of change Gary Garvin 2015-10-14T11:34:00-04:00 >2015-10-25T13:30:59-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="402" border="0" title="" alt="" /><!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" ""> <html><head><meta></head></html> The humanity of the Chicago Architecture Biennial Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-10-13T09:15:00-04:00 >2015-11-03T10:32:53-05:00 <img src="" width="514" height="345" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>As anticipation rumbled towards the opening of the <a href="" target="_blank">Chicago Architecture Biennial</a>, excitement and reservation came hand in hand. The eclectic mix of over 120 participating firms, coming from over 30 countries, made the snapshot of the profession appear, depending on your side of the spectrum, as a vibrant collage full of diverse applications, or frayed and vacillating. But after its opening on October 3, it&rsquo;s clear that the criticisms dealing in this binary miss the point &ndash;&nbsp;the Biennial is more about architects than it is about architecture.</p> The Deans List: Amale Andraos of Columbia University's GSAPP Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-10-07T09:17:00-04:00 >2015-10-09T09:17:31-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The&nbsp;<a href="" target="_blank"><strong>Deans List</strong></a>&nbsp;is an interview series with the leaders of architecture schools, worldwide. The series profiles the school&rsquo;s programming, as defined by the head honcho &ndash; giving an invaluable perspective into the institution&rsquo;s unique curriculum, faculty and academic environment.</p><p>For this issue, we spoke with&nbsp;<strong>Amale Andraos</strong>, Dean of Columbia University's&nbsp;<a href="" target="_blank">Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation</a>&nbsp;in New York City.</p> Deans List: Kenneth Schwartz of Tulane School of Architecture Julia Ingalls 2015-10-02T08:38:00-04:00 >2015-10-16T08:57:22-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="643" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The <a href="" target="_blank"><strong>Deans List</strong></a> is an interview series with the leaders of architecture schools, worldwide. The series profiles the school&rsquo;s programming, as defined by the head honcho &ndash; giving an invaluable perspective into the institution&rsquo;s unique curriculum, faculty and academic environment. For this issue, we spoke with <strong>Kenneth Schwartz</strong>, the Dean at <a href="" target="_blank">Tulane University's School of Architecture</a>.</p> An interview with Bogotá-based Giancarlo Mazzanti Laura Amaya 2015-09-30T12:18:00-04:00 >2015-10-18T05:00:44-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="314" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p><strong>Giancarlo Mazzanti</strong>&nbsp;is the Colombian architect behind such transformational works as the&nbsp;<a href="" target="_blank">Espa&ntilde;a Library in Medell&iacute;n</a>&nbsp;and El Porvenir Kindergarten in Bogot&aacute;. Founder and principal of El Equipo de Mazzanti, he has developed an innovative aesthetic based on high quality design as a catalyst for social change.</p> Deans List Special: Nader Tehrani shares his thoughts as he transitions to his new appointment at Cooper Union Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-25T13:38:00-04:00 >2015-09-29T18:49:13-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>On September 2, students at Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art returned to a school in rocky flux. Faltering under the weight of a $12 million deficit, the New York institution defaulted on its more than 150-year founding tradition, and began charging undergraduate tuition for the first time in the fall of 2014. The decision was a messy one, carrying the baggage of both a financial and identity crisis for the school.</p> The Broad Museum opens its doors for a look beyond the veil Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-23T09:02:00-04:00 >2015-10-08T18:33:22-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The white cube museum to end all white cube museums has touched down in Los Angeles. This past Sunday, the personal post-war and contemporary art collection owned by billionaire philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad, housed in Diller Scofidio + Renfro&rsquo;s meshed white box, opened for public viewing as the brand new Broad Museum, located just south of Frank Gehry&rsquo;s Walt Disney Concert Hall on downtown&rsquo;s Grand Avenue.</p> UpStarts: Christian Lahoude Studio Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-19T13:24:00-04:00 >2015-09-23T13:19:55-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="514" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>When just starting out, firms often struggle to find clients, and beef up their portfolio with small projects for friends and family. It can be difficult to establish a client base strong enough to keep the work flowing and the referrals positive, especially if the firm is hoping to specialize in a specific market. With some luck though, and knowing when to harness some momentum, the leap into a strong client base can be made pretty quick out the gate, as <a href="" target="_blank">Christian Lahoude Studio</a>&nbsp;managed in 2012.</p> Imagine that: review of “Imaginary Apparatus: New York City and Its Mediated Representation” Julia Ingalls 2015-09-17T14:31:00-04:00 >2015-09-23T06:37:04-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="775" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Like an infrastructural Ouija board planchette, the Foucaultian &ldquo;apparatus&rdquo; isn&rsquo;t exactly a device, but rather the effect of a multiplicity of participants. Each of these participants, whether they are the media, philosophical traditions, physical objects or even legal proceedings, exert a complex and nuanced force on the other, helping to control the method by which reality is shaped.&nbsp;</p> And the winners of Archinect's Dry Futures competition, "Pragmatic" category, are... Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-16T14:00:00-04:00 >2015-09-21T00:17:16-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>As much of the US is put through a record heatwave and the drought in California staggers on, jurors for Archinect's&nbsp;<a rel="nofollow" href="" target="_blank"><strong>Dry Futures</strong></a>&nbsp;competition have been sweating through the entries to find which proposals will prevail. After reviewing the many submissions, and discussing them at length, the winners have been selected!</p> And the winners of Archinect's Dry Futures competition, "Speculative" category, are... Nicholas Korody 2015-09-16T14:00:00-04:00 >2015-09-21T00:20:58-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>Even with an epic El Ni&ntilde;o&nbsp;<a rel="nofollow" href="" target="_blank">expected</a>&nbsp;to appear on the horizon, California remains locked in its severe and historic drought. But while water may be scarce in the country's largest economy, provocative and thoughtful submissions to Archinect's&nbsp;<a rel="nofollow" href="" target="_blank"><strong>Dry Futures</strong></a>&nbsp;competition weren't.</p> Finding "Shelter" in Los Angeles' housing chaos Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-09-08T12:00:00-04:00 >2015-09-20T23:16:49-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>With all the media attention on California&rsquo;s drought, the &ldquo;atoning L.A.&rdquo; narrative has gotten pretty common. The city&rsquo;s gluttonous lawns, sprawling infrastructures and indulgent residents &ndash; in short, its sinful stereotypes &ndash; have become untenable as the drought, a housing crisis and pressing sustainability measures come knocking at the city&rsquo;s door.</p> The Architecture Job Application Hints & Suggestions from Employers: Part II Julia Ingalls 2015-09-04T11:14:00-04:00 >2015-09-20T23:14:04-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="362" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>What is the best way to apply for an <a href="" target="_blank">architecture job</a>? We <a href="" target="_blank">once again</a> asked <a href="" target="_blank">employers</a> on Archinect to tell us what they look for in <a href="" target="_blank">job candidates</a>, including portfolio tips, desired software skills, and the best way to impress during an in-person interview.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Here&rsquo;s what&nbsp;we asked employers:</strong></p><ol><li>How important is it for applicants to grasp/articulate the underlying philosophy of the firm in their cover letter/application materials?</li><li>What software skills do you wish applicants to have?</li><li>How much work should an applicant include in their portfolio? Should that work be tailored to the specific types of projects the firm undertakes, or is it important to see a broad range of what the applicant can do?</li><li>How should an applicant prepare for the in-person interview process?</li><li>How important are references?</li><li>How important is your website, and the applicant's knowledge of your website, to the interview process?</li><li>What are the most common mistakes potential employees make on their applications?</li><li>Can you offer any other ...</li></ol> Greening Piano’s roof: a conversation with ecologist Paul Kephart Julia Ingalls 2015-08-31T09:13:00-04:00 >2015-09-23T02:16:50-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>A masterful work of architecture, like a great symphony, relies not just on the vision of the conductor, but on the imagination of its individual players. Many highly-regarded buildings are the result of collaborations between architects and professionals from other disciplines who, on first glance, would have no business in an architectural studio. Yet it is often the interplay between these professionals' expertise and an architect's sensibility that creates noteworthy work.</p> Architecture at the limits of instability: an interview with Smiljan Radić Nicholas Korody 2015-08-20T14:00:00-04:00 >2015-09-03T11:28:18-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="289" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>We&rsquo;re perched high above Santiago de Chile in an unassuming meeting room, near the top of a nondescript office tower at the base of the famous San Crist&oacute;bal hill. Visually-speaking, we&rsquo;re as far away from the architecture of Smiljan Radi&#263; as possible. There are no boulders or found objects, just a wooden table separating us and some relatively simple chairs. &ldquo;Why should an architect have to design furniture?&rdquo; Radi&#263; asks with a laugh, gesturing at the furnishings. &ldquo;There&rsquo;s enough of it around already.&rdquo;</p> Screen/Print #36: Harvard Design Magazine's "Well, Well, Well" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-08-14T10:32:00-04:00 >2015-08-18T17:55:48-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="720" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>&ldquo;Well, Well, Well&rdquo;, the fortieth issue from the <em>Harvard&nbsp;Design Magazine,</em>&nbsp;explores the&nbsp;tricky business of designing for health, and provokes considerations on the flip-side of neglecting to do so.</p> Completing Mies van der Rohe's Brick Country House Gary Garvin 2015-08-07T13:42:00-04:00 >2015-08-21T08:37:24-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="154" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>There are small problems that vex as much as they intrigue us, whose answers only lead to larger questions.</p> Looking to "Frank Gehry", after Paris but before Los Angeles Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-08-05T14:00:00-04:00 >2015-08-17T16:29:50-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="407" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>On September 13 of this year, Los Angeles will get its first major exhibition of Frank Gehry&rsquo;s work, ever. Despite being the adopted hometown of the world-famous architect, and the city whose new-millennium architectural identity has been inflected most by his work, Los Angeles has not yet hosted a show exclusively on Gehry's retrospective.</p> "Work on Work" exhibition turns public space into office space Julia Ingalls 2015-07-31T11:55:00-04:00 >2015-08-08T19:07:22-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>If the current exhibition at Los Angeles&rsquo; Architecture + Design Museum was titled by a sarcastic person, it would be called "Work/Life Balance: Pshaw!" As it is, the infographic-laden collection of vinyl banners loosely mounted to stacks of brown boxes, co-organized by Gensler and UCLA&rsquo;s cityLAB, is called "Work on Work", and it is both the history of and the proposed future for society's daily grind. And man, what a grind it is.</p> Screen/Print #35: PennDesign's "LA+" Amelia Taylor-Hochberg 2015-07-23T17:58:00-04:00 >2015-08-08T19:38:49-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="585" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>It all comes back to the land. <em><strong><a href="" target="_blank">LA+</a></strong></em>, the new publication produced by the Landscape Architecture Department at the <a href="" target="_blank">University of Pennsylvania&rsquo;s School of Design</a>, places landscape architecture at the origin point of a diverse panoply of disciplines. Put out twice annually, <em>LA+</em>&#8203; features precisely curated content from an array of professions that all come to focus on the landscape.</p> Upstarts: Design, Bitches Julia Ingalls 2015-07-22T13:34:00-04:00 >2015-09-21T03:37:22-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="343" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>As the name suggests, <a href="" target="_blank"><strong>Design, Bitches</strong></a> is a synergy of creativity and earthiness. Combining a refined sense of order with playful humor, the Los Angeles-based firm founded by Catherine Johnson and Rebecca Rudolph distills the splendor of urban chaos in their graphic branding, art projects, and commercial and residential interiors.</p> A Studio of 4,500: Inside Gensler's Culture Julia Ingalls 2015-07-10T12:22:00-04:00 >2015-09-20T22:58:47-04:00 <img src="" width="514" height="303" border="0" title="" alt="" /><p>The sun never sets on Gensler. One can visit their website and watch in real time as the bell curve of night fails to shadow all 46 of their office locations. Founded in 1965 by M. Arthur J. Gensler Jr., the firm has grown to <a href="" target="_blank">employ</a> over 4,500 people in 16 different countries. It&rsquo;s the kind of sprawling, vast enterprise that draws more analogies to <a href="" target="_blank">historic tea companies</a> than design firms. How can an architecture firm of this size maintain a unified studio culture? Or should it?</p>