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Marija Brdarski Travel Blog

Serbia: Belgrade, Novi Sad; Croatia: Zagreb, Osijek, Split; Slovenia: Ljubljana, Maribor; Bosnia + Herzegovina: Sarajevo; Montenegro: Kolasin, Podgorica; Macedonia: Skoplje, Bitola

 

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    Mostar, Bosnia & Hercegovina _ Department Store

    mbrdarski Jul 17 '10 1

    Mostar, Bosnia & Hercegovina _ Department Store
    Architect: A. Paljaga
    Date: 1970

    On my way to Sarajevo, I decided to prolong my Dalmatian experience with stopovers in Dubrovnik and Mostar. Highlights of the cities include the well preserved 14th century Venetian Old Town and the 16th century ‘Stari Most’ (Old Bridge), respectively.

    During my visit to Mostar - completely unplanned -I came across the remains of the Department store Razvitak (architect A. Paljaga, 1970).

    The store was damaged in the recent war and now stands in pretty bad shape; although with most of the shell in place, it’s easy to see the resemblance to other department stores of the ex-YU regions - most notably the Department store in Osijek by Mihelić. Unlike the Osijek project, which uses aluminum panels to clad the exterior, this store is made up of unique concrete panels with intricate imagery molded into each panel. It’s unclear if the intention was to develope some sort of holistic thematic narrative , but the ornament effect introduces an interesting take on the emergence of a different mode of expression - one that may echo the remains of Ottoman influence in the former Yugoslav city.

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    View of Roof of D.Store from across the Bridge

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    View of Department Store from Intersection

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    Detail of Panels

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    Corner

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    Underside

     

     
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About this Blog

This research is driven to uncover and examine the idiosyncrasies of the architecture that grew out of social modernism in Yugoslavia in the 60s and 70s. Through my travels to the Ex-Yugoslav republics, I will investigate the ways in which these characteristics are informed, urbanistically and architecturally, by the historical, social and –above all- built domain of the preceding decades in Yugoslavia.

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