Archinect

Emmett Zeifman Travel Blog

Rome, Florence, Bologna, Milan, Lyon, Barcelona, Madrid, Tarragona, Valencia, Granada, Seville, Cordoba, Lisbon, Porto, Santiago De Compostela, Gijon, Bilbao, London

  • anchor

    Madrid

    emmettzeifman Jul 15 '10 1

    Finally made it to Miguel Fisac's Iglesia de Santa Ana (1965) today. There will be more Fisac to come, but I wanted to put this up. Of the major figures of post-war Spanish architecture, he is perhaps the most clearly related to the Scandinavians, whose work he'd seen in person. Asplund is mentioned, as well as Jacobsen, but surely Aalto must have been an influence as well. The Asplund relation can be more clearly seen in a couple of buildings I'll post later.

    In the late 1950s, Fisac developed a highly specific language of pre-stressed concrete elements, or bones, here combined with both sculptural and generic cast-in-place forms. At Santa Ana, the interior is given great attention, while the exterior (the church sits in the middle of a post-war housing development) appears to be the largely unadulterated result of the interior manipulations.

    image

    The sanctuary

    image

    image

    image

    The stained glass on the rear walls

    image

    image

    image

    image

    The quite delicate pews

    image

    Inside the baptistry and confessional

    image

    image

    The parish offices

    image

    The little cloister

    image

    image

    The exterior form is clearly driven by the interior

    image

    image

    Santa Ana, like everything else, is being restored this summer. Plans and sections were conveniently posted

    image

    When I walked into the church a few people were inside testing its presumably new Bose soundsystem. It was the first time I'd been asked to be absolutely quiet in a church. I heard the noise you will hear in the video at least forty times. Bose has got to be making a killing on churches.

    Santa Ana from Emmett Zeifman on Vimeo.



     

     
  • ×Search in:
 

About this Blog

His research is focused on the diverse and shifting positions of architecture within Francoist Spain (1939-1975). It pursues a number of related questions, examining the relations between institutions of architecture and the regime, the function of architecture at the intersection of totalitarianism and an increasingly free market, and the evolution of architecture in Spain in the void left by the post-Civil War rejection of international modernism.

Affiliated with:

Authored by:

  • emmettzeifman

Other blogs affiliated with Yale University:

Recent Entries


Please wait... loading
Please wait... loading