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    Mubarak steps down.

    Lian Chikako Chang Feb 11 '11 9

    We don't know how the military will handle their power and how this will all play out.

    image

    But can we hold on to this image, and remember it when we talk about public space, not just in Egypt, but here at home, and everywhere where we aspire to democracy?

    Lian

    image

     

     
    • 9 Comments

    • Nam HendersonNam Henderson
      Feb 11, 11 1:37 pm

      woops
      try again
      here

      t a m m u z
      Feb 11, 11 3:15 pm

      oh shush

      João Gameiro Neves
      Feb 12, 11 6:32 am

      indeed..
      nice article namhenderson

      João Gameiro Neves
      Feb 12, 11 6:32 am

      indeed..
      nice article namhenderson

      Lian Chikako Chang
      Feb 12, 11 10:02 am

      Thanks, nam! Thanks for the link to that great post.

      I'm interested by the idea that “The true value of an urban public square is that it is free from large obstructions. The square allows people to make use of its openness for a range of activities." When I was in Tiananmen Square, there are no physical obstructions, but a heavy visible (and, one could say, invisible) police presence. And that is a considerable obstruction.

      superinteresting!
      Feb 14, 11 10:00 am

      Thanks, Lian. I agree there's an incredible sense of power in how public space is reformatted, perhaps early on in the revolution by digital networks, but then by actual people, in masses, later on. My own thoughts on social movements and urban space, the inaugural post on MVMTBLDG - architecture and social justice,

      Nam HendersonNam Henderson
      Feb 14, 11 2:24 pm

      lian good point of course. The publicness of a space does not depend solely on the lack of physical obstructions, it can be rendered neutral by less physical (in the built environment sense) forms of control. However, having public space whether, square, cafe or street does i think reinforce the sense of a shared public realm. Which can also be virtual, see the role of twitter et al in egypt etc..

      Within context of China such a discussion could perhaps look at the less physical but just as controlling/obtrusive virtual "Great (fire)Wall" and its impact on a "public" realm.

      Nam HendersonNam Henderson
      Feb 17, 11 2:02 pm

      Vishaan Chakrabarti has a nice piece over at Urban Omnibus on Liberation Squares

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Lectures and exhibitions, life in the trays, happenings around Cambridge...and once in a while, some studio and course work. Please note that all live blogs are abridged and approximate. If you want to see exactly what happened, in most cases a video of the event is posted online by the event's hosts. If you have concerns about how you are quoted, please contact me via Archinect's email.

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